100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 10, 2018 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

michigandaily.com
Thursday, May 10, 2018

INDEX

Vol. CXXVII, No. 116 | © 2018 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS ....................................
OPINION ...............................
ARTS ......................................
MiC.........................................
SPORTS................................

MICHIGAN IN COLOR
Defend DACA
Immigrant protections
are at risk under Donald
Trump

>> SEE PAGE 9

NEWS
Racist list update

University investigation of

crass and racist Elite Bar

Crawl list is at a stand still.

>> SEE PAGE 2

OPINION
Let’s Make a Pact

Hannah Harshe explores how

different standards are set for

men and women at work.

>> SEE PAGE 5

ARTS

‘This is America’
Childish Gambino
releases confrontational
new single.

>> SEE PAGE 7

SPORTS
Softball prevails
over Ohio State

On Senior Day, the

Michgan softball team

defeated its biggest rival

>> SEE PAGE 12

inside

2
4
6
9
10
See RESEARCH, Page 3

U-M sued by Speech First
over Bias Response Team

Organization files
injunction against
“U” over free speech


By GRACE KAY

Summer Managing News Editor

The University of Michigan is

the first university in the nation to
receive a federal lawsuit regarding
the effect the U-M Bias Response
Team might have on speech
freedom on campus.

On Tuesday, Speech First, an

organization of students, citizens
and alumni advocating free speech
on college campuses, filed a federal
lawsuit against the University,
challenging the Bias Response
Team’s accordance with the U.S.
Constitution and calling for a
permanent injunction prohibiting
the Bias Response Team from
investigating students.

Speech First President Nicole

Neily said the organization is
filing the injunction against the
University based on three main

factors.

“We have multiple members of

the organization at the University,”
Neily said. “The University of
Michigan also has a combination
of a very bad speech code that
is very vague, a very active bias
response team that is very proud of
its achievements because it keeps
a log and we have numbers there,
though not all were listed in the
complaint. These were the three
things we needed.”

This is not the first time the

University’s
speech
code
and

freedom of speech has been called
into question. In 2017, hundreds of
students flooded into the Michigan
League to voice displeasure with
the Michigan Political Union’s
decision to debate the Black Lives
Matter movement as harmful to
racial relations, causing many
people outside of the University
to question whether unpopular
voices or perspectives can be
heard at the University. Similarly,
when Charles Murray, author of
“The Bell Curve,” a book which
argues for the concept of racial

differences in intelligence, spoke
at the University, several students
attempted to shut down the event.

The University has experienced

controversy on the speech code
as far back as 1989. A 1989 case,
Doe v. University of Michigan,
determined the University’s 1988
hate speech law violated the
constitutional right to free speech.

Neily claims freedom of speech

and the campus atmosphere are
stifled by vague and subjective
speech codes and bias response
teams.

“It is very difficult to have a

system in place (like a bias response
team) without having a mechanism
that kills speech,” Neily said. “I fail
to see how you can have that kind
of system without entirely stifling
free speech.”

According to the University’s

Bias Response Team website,
a bias incident is anything that
discriminates against a community
based on their identity.

New pill
can detect
breast cancer
Researchers at “U”
develop pill to reduce
overtreatment

By NATSAHA PIETRUSCHKA

Daily Staff Reporter

Researchers at the University of

Michigan are developing a new diagnostic
pill that improves conventional detection
methods and reduces the overtreatment
of breast cancer. The U-M research
team, led by Greg Thurber, chemical
engineering
assistant
professor,
is

refining an oral pill that dissolves in the
bloodstream and illuminates tumors
under infrared light.

According to Thurber, many women

who have breast cancer tumors would
never suffer from the disease but are
treated
anyway.
Mammography,
a

common form of breast cancer detection,
determines the existence of a tumor but
not if the tumor is cancerous or benign.
Chemicals in the new pill are able to bind
to cancerous tissue and light up under
infrared light to inform physicians where
cancerous tumors are located.

Thurber
says
that
knowing

information at the molecular level is at
the core of effective cancer detection.

“We’ve known from decades of

research in cancer biology that it’s really
a molecular disease, so what’s nice about
our approach is that you’re actually
getting molecular information,” Thurber
said.

The
pill
is
an
alternative
to

mammograms or other methods such
as magnetic resonance imaging and
ultrasounds. According to Thurber,
mammograms
can
sometimes
be

inaccurate, as they may miss tumors in
women with dense breast tissue.

Thurber believes his team’s method

would be useful at spotting tumors in
patients where mammograms don’t work
well.

See LAWSUIT, Page 3

DANYEL THARAKAN / DAILY

ONE-HUNDRED-TWENTY SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

RESEARCH

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan