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April 06, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, April 6, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

ALICE LIU/Daily

Take Back the Night Ann Arbor holds its 40th anniversary rally and march at the Union Thursday night.

GOVERNMENT

Protest units students, community members to take a stand against sexual assault

Nicole Denson, the associate

director
at
Wayne
County

Sexual
Assault
Forensic

Examiner’s program, inspired
the audience of Ann Arbor’s
40th annual Take Back the
Night rally — a march taking a
stand against sexual violence —
with an empowering call.

“Let’s not make this a sad

night, let’s make this a happy
night,” Denson said. “Let’s take
back the night!”

The
event,
hosted
by

Michigan
Takes
Back
the

Night and a team of volunteers,
aimed to support and empower
survivors, provide resources,
and collectively take a stand
against sexual assault. The
night began with attendees
interacting
with
different

organizations tabling at the
event, such as Women and
Gender
in
Public
Policy,

Planned
Parenthood
and

#StandWithTheseGirls.
All

the
while,
inspiring
songs

like Rachel Platten’s “Fight
Song” played on the speakers,
culminating in the projection
of the music video of Kesha’s
“Praying,” a song of healing,
hope and forgiveness.

This
theme
of
healing

was
emphasized
in
singer-

songwriter
Jena
Irene

Asciutto’s
performances
as

well. Asciutto, the 2014 runner-
up of “American Idol,” sang her

songs
“Numb,”
“Innocence”

and “Unbreakable” between the
different speeches.

Ann
Arbor
Mayor

Christopher Taylor spoke first,
expressing his support of Take
Back the Night’s message, as
well as organizations across
Ann Arbor combating sexual
violence. He recognized the
gravity of this issue and the
great deal of work which needs
to be done, but said he remained
optimistic.

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE

Daily Staff Reporter

See RALLY, Page 3

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 106
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

Annual Take Back the Night rally
calls for end to sexual violence

Last week, the University

of Michigan Board of Regents
unanimously voted to remove
the
name
of
the
former

Clarence Cook Little Science
Building. Since the decision
late last week, the University
has taken steps in clearing the
building’s name from usage.
Less than one hour after the
decision was made, the old
building sign was removed
and changed to “1100 North
University Building.” Given
the short notice, departments
across campus are continuing
to remove the name from
flyers
and
other
campus

resources.

During
the
Regents

meeting last week, Regent
Andrea
Newman,
R,

addressed
the
University’s

important role in “changing
the
student
vernacular,”

claiming members of the U-M
community
will
continue

to identify the building, as
well as the Central Campus
Transit Center, as C.C. Little.
Students and faculty alike
are still reflecting on the
University’s duty in mediating

how C.C. Little’s name and
history will be remembered in
campus culture.

Little,
the
University

president of during the first
half of the 20th century,
was a strong supporter of
the eugenics movement and
a proponent of the tobacco

industry.
Many
students,

faculty and administrators
on campus believe Little’s
legacy
does
not
deserve

commemoration and a named
building.

According
to
University

spokeswoman
Kim

Broekhuizen, U-M Logistics,

Transportation
&
Parking

is working to change the
bus
announcements
that

currently refer to the Central
Campus Transit Center as the
C.C. Little Transit Station.

Earlier
this
week,
the

University
Athletics

This year, all three of the

University of Michigan men’s
basketball, men’s hockey and
debate teams have made it to
their respective Final Four
tournaments.
The
National

Debate Tournament took place
last weekend at Wichita State
University in Kansas, where
the U-M team eventually lost
to Georgetown University in
the semifinals.

Founded
in
1890,
the

Michigan Debate Team is one
of the oldest debate programs
in the country. It has reached
the semifinals in the National
Debate Tournament five times
since 2008. This year’s team,
consisting
of
LSA
juniors

Caitlin Walrath and Jacob
Goldschlag, was led by Director
of Debate Aaron Kall. Thrilled

See DEBATE, Page 3

‘U’ debate
team third
to go to the
Final Four

CAMPUS LIFE

Program joins hockey,
basketball in getting to
tournament semifinals

REMY FARKAS
Daily Staff Reporter

The Name Remains: ‘U’ responds to
CC Little bus stop after Regents vote

Students call on admin to denounce Little’s legacy, address cultural namesake

NATASHA PIETRUSCHKA

Daily Staff Reporter

See LITTLE, Page 3

At approximately 3:00 p.m.

Thursday afternoon Division
of Public Safety and Security
officers arrested a shirtless
white male on the northwest
portion
of
the
University

of Michigan Diag, between
Mason Hall and the E.H. Kraus
Building. Officers from the Ann
Arbor Police Department were
also on the scene.

Engineering freshman Jim

Walrad witnessed the arrest
while handing out flyers for the
Men’s Glee Club Spring Concert.

“(After
hearing
noise)
I

eventually looked at that section
of the Diag and saw two police
vehicles and I saw a man lying
face down on the ground,”
Walrad said. “He had pants
on but no shirt –– looked like
sweatpants and running shoes

See DIAG, Page 3

Man runs
shirtless on
Diag before
his arrest

CRIME

Witnesses say individual
appeared to be on drugs,
was “being disruptive”

REMY FARKAS
Daily Staff Reporter

ROSEANNE CHAO/Daily

Democratic gubernatorial

candidate
Abdul
El-Sayed,

a
University
of
Michigan

alum, held his final rally of
the semester in Lorch Hall
Thursday
night,
featuring

Alex Ebert, the lead singer of
rock band Edward Sharpe &
the Magnetic Zeros.

About
100
students

attended
the
“Start
of

Summer Rally” to launch
the
campaign’s
“People’s

Summer”, which that focuses
on mobilizing young people
to vote in the Democratic
gubernatorial primary August
7.

Intended
to
draw

participants from across the
state, the event was live-
streamed to several other
universities including Grand
Valley
State
University,

Central Michigan University,
Oakland University and more.

El-Sayed graduated from

the University in 2007 and
then went on to receive a
doctorate degree from Oxford
University
as
a
Rhodes

Scholar and later a medical
degree
from
Columbia

University. El-Sayed served
as health officer for the city
of Detroit from 2015 to 2016,
and became youngest health
official of a major U.S. city
at age 30 when he served
as executive director of the
Detroit Health Department.
He said he was called to
public service through his
experience
with
various

positions in the Detroit area
as well as his desire to see
systematic change on a local
level.

“Every single responsibility

we took on led to the closed
door of a politician –– people
whose doors don’t open for
people like you and I, that only
open for the moneyed folks,”
El-Sayed said. “And I realized
that I was done waiting at that
closed door.”

Rocker joins
El-Sayed for
rally to kick
off summer

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros
frontman gives candidate his support

KATHERINA SOURINE

Daily Staff Reporter

See ABDUL, Page 2

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