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April 05, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Donned in maize and blue

T-shirts that read “Michigan
Grandpa”
and
“Michigan

Mom,” Freddy Kennett and
Robby Hauldren took the stage
at Ann Arbor’s Hill Auditorium
for Music Matters’s annual
SpringFest. Five months ago,
the duo electrified the crowd
at Detroit’s Masonic Temple
with a phenomenal rundown
through
their
discography,

but last night’s performance
was
different.
After
trips

to both Europe and South
America
for
a
tour
with

Whethan and performances
for
Lollapalooza’s
regional

tour
respectively,
Kennett

and Hauldren seemed to have
a stronger grasp of how to
transform an EDM show from
a disk-spinning display of
their content into a dynamic
and engaging experience.

With new music to work

with, like their beat tape
Honey, Kennett and Hauldren
layered tracks left and right.
Their
famed
release,
“It’s

Strange,” normally reserved
for the show’s encore, was
thrown in mid-set with the

heavy beat of “Drip Drip”
in
the
background.
They

also paid their respects to
electronic
music
pioneers,

Justice, with a remix of the
group’s hit track “D.A.N.C.E.”
Still, they didn’t shy away from
unadulterated crowd-pleasing
hits, ending the evening with
their most recent blow-up
track, “Last To Leave.” All
in all, the performance was
engaging and unpredictable,
aspects that can be hard to
come by at EDM shows, where

songs are often played in
isolation with no regard for
live arrangement.

The show’s opening acts,

Miller Guth and Lost Kings,
also
put
on
impressive

performances,
with
the

typically
pop-driven
Lost

Kings
toying
with
head-

banging bass drops. These
acts, plus a more artistically
mature Louis The Child, made
this
year’s
SpringFest
an

absolute success.

In commemoration of the 50th

anniversary of Martin Luther
King Jr.’s passing, the Ford School
of Public Policy held a policy
talk Wednesday evening on the
prospects of the healthcare in the
United States and the Affordable
Care Act. The talk began with an
introduction from Law professor
Michael Barr.

Barr
highlighted
King’s

work during his “Poor People’s”
campaign, which was designed
to draw attention to U.S. poverty
in the late 1960s with special
attention to poor health care.

“Of all the forms of inequality,

injustice in health care is the most
shocking and inhumane,” King
said at a 1966 Medical Committee
for Human Rights convention.

The talk was moderated by

Public Policy professor Paula
Lantz, who explained the context
of the ACA during its creation
under President Barack Obama’s
administration, as well as current
disparagement
by
President

Donald Trump’s administration.

The ACA introduced new

restrictions on health care: With
few exceptions, citizens were
required to obtain health care
coverage,
allowing
states
to

expand their Medicaid programs
to those who previously didn’t
qualify.
However,
critics
of

the ACA point out its cost and
inequitable distributions among
classes.

Lantz asked panelists where

the Affordable Care Act stands
today, and how it has changed
under the Trump administration
after an agressive but ultimately
doomed campaign to ‘repeal
and replace.’ Economist Gail
Wilensky,
former
President

George H.W. Bush’s senior health
and welfare adviser, opened the
debate by noting she believes
the Trump administration has
passed very little legislation with
regard to the act the threat of
repeal.

“Despite the efforts of not

very
effective
Republicans

in Congress, there has been
precious little change on the ACA
in terms of participation both
by individuals and insurance
companies,” Wilensky said.

Jonathan
Cohn,
a
senior

national correspondent at the
Huffington Post, identified two
main successes of the ACA. First,
he argued, the ACA has increased
human welfare and access to care
through its national coverage

expansion.

“These aren’t just numbers

and stats, these are really people
getting health care,” Cohn said.

Second,
Cohn
noted
the

ACA
has
changed
political

conversation and expectations
of what the government should
provide its people. Even though
the ACA has been criticized by
many, those same critics do not
support absolute repeal.

John
Ayanian,
a
health

Natural-foods store Better

Health is relocating from its
East Stadium Street location
to Washtenaw Avenue, where
it will rebrand itself as Better
Health Market and Café. The
new health produce store will
open April 12 with its grand
opening on April 18, and will
feature an expanded selection
of produce, in-house food and
kombucha on tap.

Owner Tedd Handlesman

wanted
to
offer
customers

other options besides vitamins
and supplements, so he chose
to expand Better Health to sell
more produce and prepared
foods.

“Our mission is our name,

to help improve and better
the health of everyone that
patrons
our
establishment,”

Handlesman said. “We want
to continue to grow and to do
that with new markets and
locations.”

In addition to the Nature’s

Kitchen Café, the new location
will feature a kombucha bar.
Here,
customers
will
have

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, April 5, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

LEO to strike next week
pending ‘U’ salary proposal

Louis the Child headlines
SpringFest, shows growth

CHUN SO/Daily

Panelist Gail Wilensky discusses issues surrounding current health care policies at the Annenberg Auditorium Wednesday.

DANYEL THARAKAN/Daily

Students attend SpringFest’s Louis the Child concert at Hill Auditorium
Wednesday Night.

ARTS

Group authorizes picket lines April 9 and 10 if demands are not satisfied

Members of the Lecturers’

Employee
Organization
will

strike on April 9 and 10 if the
University of Michigan does
not satisfy their demands for
significant
salary
increases

before Sunday. LEO members
voted Wednesday evening to
authorize the action.

Last
week,
lecturers

authorized
union
leadership

to call for a walkout and
have showed “overwhelming
support” for them to do so, LEO
President Ian Robinson said.

“There
is
absolutely
no

question of our resolve on this,”
Robinson said after a general
membership meeting in Ann
Arbor. “All three campuses are
in unity on this — for going
forward with our strike plan
if we do not have an adequate
offer on the table by Sunday.”

After
several
additional

LEAH GRAHAM
Daily Staff Reporter

See HEALTH, Page 3A

Health cafe
and market
relocating,
expanding

BUSINESS

Organic, natural food store
BetterHealth is moving
centrally after rebrand

CORY ZAYANCE
Daily Staff Reporter

Ford panel talks current-day status
of Affordable Care Act, life of MLK

HuffPost Senior reporter Jonathon Cohn, joined by Public Policy professors

ABBY TAKAS
Daily Staff Writer

b-side

Daily Arts writers delve into
the subject of how disability

is portrayed in the arts,

from film to music to TV.

» Page 1B

See ACA, Page 3A
Particularly
in
student

neighborhoods
surrounding

the University of Michigan,
poor
lighting
continues
to

be a cause for concern, as
many students and Ann Arbor
residents draw a correlation
between
frequent
campus

crime alerts, pedestrian safety
and poor street lighting.

Online
crime
statistics

highlight
a
potential

correlation between crime in
the city and poorly lit areas.
According to February 2018
data from the Ann Arbor
Observer Crime Map, crime
concentrates around areas like
Packard or State Street. The
most common crimes in these
areas are burglaries, followed
by slightly lower instances of
robbery and sexual assault.
Instances
of
burglary
and

robbery in 2017 also spiked in
October
through
December

— though in 2016, crime was
much higher in the spring —
especially around areas like
North State and Packard Street.

Packard was one of a few

See OFF-CAMPUS, Page 3A

See LEO, Page 3A

Street light
lacking in
off-campus
community

COMMUNITY AFFAIRS

Residents draw correlation
between crime statistics
and inadequate lighting

GRACE KAY

Daily Staff Reporter

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 105
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

UM Ann Arbor
UM Dearborn
UM Flint

$34,500

$40,000

$60,000

$31,300

$56,000

$30,300

$56,000

$28,300
$27,300

Minimum starting salary for a lecturer

LEO’s requested minimum starting salary for a lecturer

University’s starting salary offers in response to LEO’s demands

LECTURER SALARIES

MIKE WATKINS

Daily Arts Writer

Disability in the Arts

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