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March 22, 2018 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily

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When LSA sophomore Izzy

Nakisher entered the University
of Michigan, she didn’t know
her major. She visited her
adviser,
who
was
assigned

to her at orientation, once
every few weeks her freshman
year, trying to figure out a
direction. Four major changes
later, Nakisher is now ready to
declare. Her adviser, she said,
was key in making this happen.

An
academic
adviser
is

assigned to students at the
University
during
their

orientation
before
starting

school in the fall. According
to the Newnan LSA Academic
Advising
Center’s
website,

general advising is meant to
help students plan out their
college as well as future careers.

Newnan Director Tim Dodd

wrote, in an email interview,
many students seek help from
advisers for issues regarding
course selection, advice on
their major or minor, or even
personal issues.

“We often say that our job

is to help students construct

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, March 22, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 96
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

CAMPUS LIFE

The Maize Collective hosted

their second “Industry Insight”
panel
series
Wednesday

night, inviting guests in the
music industry to talk on
their experiences in booking
and promoting. University of
Michigan students and local
music
enthusiasts
gathered

at the University of Michigan
Museum of Art to hear about
the challenges of entering the
music industry.

Moderator
Augusta

Morrison invited the diverse
group of panelists to share how
their personal endeavors led
them to the positions they have
now in booking, outreach and
promotion.

Working in the industry for

over 25 years, Christine Kitora
currently works as the talent
buyer and event coordinator for
Ann Arbor’s Necto Nightclub.

“My path was definitely not a

straight line,” Kitora said. “For
many people in the industry,

it’s never been a straight line.”

Kitora
and
many
other

panelists
shared
similar

experiences of working at small
clubs and venues, eventually
working their way to new
positions and facing different
challenges at every new place.

Kitora
emphasized
the

importance of the collaborative
work behind each show, from
those who mop venue floors
to those who prepare the
wardrobe.

“Any
organization,
any

venue, any show is only as good
as the sum of its parts. It takes
everybody,” she said.

Mark
Jacobson,
senior

programming manager of the
University
Musical
Society,

curates
jazz,
international

and
contemporary
art-rock

presentations for UMS. He
offered his perspective on
what drives him through long
hours and hectic timelines.

“The
industry
is
hard,”

Jacobson said. “You have to
somehow fan the fire and keep
the passion. At the end of the

Music panel
shares scoop
on entering
the industry

Vice president for student life talks
campus climate, national issues

RUCHITA IYER/Daily

Vice president of student life E. Royster Harper speaks to The Daily about Greek Life, improving the first year experience and building diverse communities in the
Fleming Administration Building early Wednesday afternoon.

Maize Collective’s Industry Insight talks
promotion and booking with students

NATASHA PIETRUSCHKA

Daily Staff Reporter

E. Royster Harper discusses Greek Life, racist Snapchat incident and gun violence

The
Michigan
Daily
sat

down with E. Royster Harper,
the
University
of
Michigan’s

vice president for student life,
for a conversation Wednesday
afternoon
on
current
issues

affecting
both
campus
and

national climate. Harper spoke on
national issues, such as campus
sexual assault, recent Michigan
legislationto improve resources

for survivors; gun violence and
the
University
preparedness.

Royster also touched on campus
news, specifically, the University’s
decision to move to a winter rush
process for Greek life and the
racist Snapchat featuring two
students in blackface with the
caption “#blacklivesmatter” that
was circulated this past weekend.

Sexual assault
To begin, Harper spoke on

issues of sexual assault and
misconduct, highlighting actions
the University has taken to
hold perpetrators accountable.

Recently, the Michigan state
Senatepassed
legislation
to

improve resources and support
for
survivors,
specifically

by expanding the statute of
limitations on reporting sexual
assault, increasing the number
of
mandatory
reporters
at

universities and placing more
emphasis on holding institutions
accountable for failing to report
cases of assault and harassment.
Before the vote on this legislation
occured, however, the Michigan
Association of State Universities,
of which the University is a

member,
attempted
to
delay

voting on the bills in a move
state
Sen.
Margaret
O’Brien,

R-Kalamazoo,
claimed
would

“delay justice, or maybe the hope
is to stop it entirely.”

In response to O’Brien’s claim,

Harper stated these allegations
are wrong, arguing that by
asking for more time to consider
possible legislation, universities
are seeking the ability to consider
options
before
jumping
into

conclusions that may not be as
effective.

JORDYN BAKER &
AMARA SHAIKH
Daily News Reporter

In honor of National Women’s

History Month, panelists as part
of the “Women in Public Service”
panel spoke about their career
paths as female leaders working
in the political sphere, pivotal
changes in their lives and career
advice.

Erin
Byrnes,
lead
for

democratic engagement at the
Ginsberg Center, spoke about the
intended event impact and the
importance of conversations of
this nature.

“Our democratic engagement

work is focused on multiple
different facets, one of which is
really encouraging our students
to see themselves in a body of
elected officials – people who
are doing important work behind
the scenes,” Byrnes said. “We
are in the midst of a national
conversation about what women
are doing, how they’re treated
and how they deserve to be
treated. The more we can bring
unique voices and experiences
to the table and highlight them,
that’s better for all of us as a
community.”

Panelists discussed challenges

they faced while trying to
break
into
the
industry.

Ghida
Dagher,
director
of

Government Partnerships and
Community Affairs at United
Way for Southeastern Michigan,
discussed how she had to make
a distinct effort to be heard in
political spaces.

“I had a realization that I had

to be twice as loud, twice as vocal
as everyone else in the room,”
Dagher said. “Quite often I’m the
youngest person in the room …
and because of the nature of our
work, I’m usually the only woman
in the room. I have to think about
everything – kind of absorb, seek
out the players and understand
what’s
happening,
and
then

vocalize.”

She continued by speaking on

how she felt women were held
to a different standard than most
men in politics, responding to a
comment another panelist made
about how female politicians
should “never stand by the bar,
and be seen with a drink in hand.”

“I think there are a lot of social

norms, I would call them, that
are acceptable for men and are
not acceptable for women in this
space,” she said. “Particularly in
this space, I feel like the women

are under a microscope, every
movement, if you’re a candidate,
what you wear is open for
criticism.”

University
Regent
Andrea

Fischer Newman, R, agreed with
the statement, adding she felt the
#MeToo movement was pivotal
in giving women an opportunity
to speak up about the pervasive
issue of sexual assault and
harassment.

For many students, meeting

Reggie the Campus Corgi, also
known as Reggie Bee, is the
highlight of their day or even
their week. So, it comes as no
surprise that when a campaign
was started on March 16 to elect
Reggie Bee for Central Student
Government president, students
showed their support. Three
days after the creation of the
Reggie Bee for CSG Facebook
page,
Reggie
accepted
the

nomination.

Engineering
junior
Brett

Swiecicki voted for Reggie as
CSG president.

“Honestly, with the content

I’m exposed to on a daily basis,
personal, interpersonal, on social
media or in print advertising,
Reggie was the only person
that I knew that was ‘officially
running’ for Central Student
Government,” Swiecicki said. “I
was aware of other platforms, but
I wasn’t aware of any of the other
people that were running or what
they stood for. The main reason I
wanted him to win is because I
feel as though he should be more

Reggie the
Corgi no
longer CSG
candidate

CAMPUS LIFE

Popular write-in candidate
encourages students to
vote for human president

ZOE BAXTER

Daily Staff Reporter

CHUN SO/Daily

Panel member Rep. Donna Lasinski speaks about her career path and challenges she has faced at the Women in Pub-
lic Service panel in the Blau Colloquium Wednesday.

Women in Public Service panel speaks
on challenges of entering government

Hosted by the Ginsberg Center, event honors National Women’s History Month

RHEA CHEETI
Daily Staff Reporter

See WOMEN, Page 3A

See KITORA, Page 3A
See VP, Page 2A

See REGGIE, Page 3A
See ADVISING, Page 3A

Academics
advising
sees mixed
feedback

ACADEMICS

Some students express
frustration with advisory
apathy, others supportive

SAYALI AMIN
Daily Staff Reporter

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