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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, March 15, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

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Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 92
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Central
Student

Government
released
its

2018
internal
demographic

report Monday, with 52 of 68
representatives responding to
the survey. The report showed
increased representation of
minority students from last
year.

CSG
representative
Efe

Edevbie, a Kinesiology junior,
said the survey aims to depict
students representation within
the student government.

According to the report,

61.54 percent of CSG is between
the ages of 20 and 21. Over 38
percent of CSG members are
seniors, while 20.6 percent of
total University of Michigan
students are seniors.

In terms of sex, CSG was

52 percent female and 48
percent
male,
while
the

undergraduate student body is
about 49 percent female and 51
percent male. No respondents
identified as transgender. Last

year’s survey reported CSG
was 58.1 percent male, 40.7
percent female and 1.2 percent
genderqueer.

The report also states 57.69

percent of CSG representatives
identify as white, 11.54 percent
Black, 19.23 percent Asian, 5.77
percent Middle Eastern and
North African, 3.85 percent
Latino, and 1.92 percent mixed
race. No respondents identified
as Native American. In last
year’s report, 69.8 percent of
CSG representatives identified
as white, 7 percent Black, 9.3
percent Asian, 8.1 percent
mixed race and 0 percent
Latino. MENAstudents were
classified as “Other,” which
constituted 4.7 percent.

The
general
increase

in
diversity
of
elected

representatives, Edevbie said,
started with running more
diverse candidates.

“Our candidates for last

year were very diverse and
really touched on a lot of
parts on campus, both on a
racial aspect and just overall

CSG statistic
report shows
more diverse
’18 assembly

Washtenaw County youth walk out
of class in support of gun control

COURTESY OF ELIZABETH LAWRENCE/Daily

Washtenaw International High School sophomore Elizabeth Blackwell delivers her spoken-word poem at a student-organized gun control rally in Ypsilanti Wednes-
day.

Internal demographics disply greater
representation of gender, racial minorities

RACHEL CUNNINGHAM

Daily News Reporter

Between 400 and 600 attended the student-organized awareness rally in Ypsilanti

Amid cheers and shouts,

Washtenaw International High
School sophomore Elizabeth
Blackwell
delivered
her

spoken-word poem at a student-
organized gun control rally
in Ypsilanti Wednesday. Her
piece was written a day after
the Parkland, Fla. shooting,
titled “An Open Letter to my
Congressman.”

“So don’t you dare exchange

our learning for your lobbyists,
our
safety
for
your
semi-

automatics, our dreams for
donations,”
Blackwell
said.

“Because pissed off teenagers
that are so alive, and so in love
in with living, will not let you
to reduce us to thoughts and
prayers –– to another statistic.
Because we will be the tsunami
that carries you out of office for
good.”

The rally was organized by

Washtenaw Youth Initiative,
an
organization
consisting

primarily
of
high
school

students
that
formed
in

reaction to the Feb. 14 shooting
at Marjory Stoneman Douglas
High which left 17 dead. The
Initiative’s platform consists of
five main points: banning guns
in schools, raising the legal
age of purchase to 21, implicit
bias training and psychological
certification of police officers
carrying guns, requiring a gun
safety class before purchase
and banning the sale of assault
weapons.

Pioneer High School senior

and Student Council President

Emma Roth was one of the
main organizers of the event
and collaborated with students
from other high schools such
as Skyline, Lincoln and South
Lyon. The students organized
through social media to garner
more support. Roth estimated
the final turnout to be between
400 and 600 people.

And
they’re
not
alone.

Wednesday,
students

nationwide walked out of their
classrooms
to
pressure
the

government to enact stricter

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE

Daily News Reporter

At the start of last year,

the
Kessler
Presidential

Scholars Program launched
its two-year pilot expansion
initiative
with
the
hope

of serving its recipients in
a
more
holistic
manner.

The
program
is
targeted

toward individuals who have
financial need, are among
the first in their families to
attend college, demonstrate
leadership aptitude and have
an
interest
in
community

service. The pilot is now
halfway completed, and aims
to continue developing its
resources for students.

The expansion emphasized

five main areas: intentional
cohort
recruitment,

substantial financial support,
unique
programming
and

resources,
community-

building
through
alumni

outreach
and
systematic

evaluation.

Program
Director
Gail

Gibson
explained
the

expansion
was
established

to better meet the mission of
ensuring students’ ability to
thrive socially, academically
and emotionally on campus.

“We’re
really
thinking

through how we can extend
our reach and help students
thrive
while
they’re
at

Michigan, as well as when
they leave here and go on to
whatever comes next and

what that looks like with
scholarship support but also
with wrap-around resources
to fill in other kinds of gaps,”
Gibson said.

Gibson further explained

how of the many changes the
program hopes to develop;
the prioritization of first-
generation
students


through
intentional
cohort

recruitment — is one of the
most important factors.

“One of the first changes,

was
to
prioritize
first-

generation students, which
we define as students whose
parents attended some college
but who don’t have a four-
year
bachelor’s
degree,”

Gibson
said.
“That
focus

on
first-generation
student

distinguishes
the
program

among scholarship programs
at Michigan.”

Gibson
also
said
the

program
was
taking

actionable steps to meet the

goal by carefully selecting
applicants based on their need
and
leadership
inclination.

According
to
the
Kessler

Presidential
Scholars
2017

Annual Report, all scholars
in the 2017 cohort were first-
generation.

“We
are
doing
really

intentional
recruitment

of
who
comes
into
the

scholarship program, which
means
going
back
after

students are admitted to read
The University of Michigan

chapter of College Republicans
hosted a panel titled “Women in
Politics” Wednesday evening in
the Michigan League to showcase
strong conservative female leaders
in the Republican Party.

Four panelists spoke at the event:

Linda Lee Tarver, president of the
Republican
Women
Federation

of
Michigan;
Andrea
Fischer

Newman, a University regent and
former Delta Airlines lobbyist;
Congressional
candidate
Lena

Epstein; and campaign strategy
consultant Dawn Dodge.

Tarver monitored the event and

began by stating only 1 percent
of Americans fully participate in
politics, which she attributes to
the respectable level of the self-
confidence needed.

“While we have a lot of political

activists in this room, only 1 percent
participate in politics,” Tarver said.
“It takes quite a bit of (intestinal
feeling) and girth in order to get
out and put your name out there
and your face out there and voice
what you truly believe in. It is not
to be disrespected. It is not to be put

Women in
politics talk
leadership,
diversity

GOVERNMENT

College Republicans host
event, discuss conservative
views on representation

Kessler Scholar Program

new students
enter the program
each year

35

of 2017 incoming
students were first
generation

100%
1. Intentional cohort
recruitment
2. Substantial financial
support
3. Unique programming
and resources
4. Community-building
through alumni outreach
5. Systematic evaluation
and research

Expansion

172

Supports

students across
all 4 years

ALEXA DI LUCA/Daily

Kessler Presidential Scholars Program
launches two-year expansion initiative

Program aims to provide support and resources to students leaders with financial need

AMARA SHAIKH
Daily News Reporter

RACHEL CUNNINGHAM

Daily News Reporter

See KESSLER, Page 3

See PANEL, Page 2

See WALKOUT, Page 3
See CSG, Page 3

See NASSAR, Page 3

Wednesday
evening,
the

Michigan State Senate approved
bipartisan legislation to provide
more resources and support
to survivors of sexual assault
and harassment with a vote
of 28-7. The bills will now
go to the Michigan House of
Representatives.

Led by the victims of Larry

Nassar, disgraced former U.S.A.
Gymnastics
and
Michigan

State
University
doctor,
the

legislation came in a package of
bills that works to change how
universities and state institutions
respond
to
sexual
assault

reports. Under the legislation,
penalties for possessing child
pornography are increased to
four years. The individuals
legally required to report sexual
abuse complaints also increased
to
include
coaches,
athletic

trainers,
physical
therapists

with a penalty of $1,000 for not
reporting. In addition, the law
clarifies
government
entities,

universities and colleges do not
have immunity from cases of
sexual assault.

MI Senate
passes bills
spurred by
Nassar trial

GOVERNMENT

Package of bills passes
in state Senate, increases
statute of limitations

JORDYN BAKER
Daily News Reporter

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