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February 22, 2018 - Image 1

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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, February 22, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

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Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 82
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

ACADEMICS

Getting good grades, having

the best teachers and applying
to college are all integral parts
of one’s education. But for
students of color, many of these
aspirations cannot be met due
to structural racism and the
broken pipeline within our
educational system.

Nikole
Hannah-Jones,
a

New York Times investigative
journalist and 2017 MacArthur
“Genius”, came to the University
of Michigan’s Institute of Social
Research Wednesday to discuss
educational
segregation
and

racial inequities.

Jones
opened
the

conversation
by
discussing

the prevalence of segregation
within the public education
system and why the system
continues to be propagated.

“Segregation has produced

benefit for white Americans and
harm for Black Americans,” she
said.

Jones cited statistics that

compared schools with a white
majority
and
schools
with

students-of-color
majority.

Universities
were
not
an

exception
to
the
presented

inequality.

“The share of Black freshmen

at elite schools is virtually
unchanged since 1980,” Jones
said.
“Black
students
are

just 6 percent of freshmen
but 15 percent of college-age
Americans.”

Jones continued to explain

those in positions of privilege
often
believe
they
are

fighting for equality, but do
not acknowledge their own
hypocrisy in separating their
children by sending them to
schools that have extremely
small populations of students of
color.

“We cannot say we want equal

opportunity for all children
then fight for the advantages of
our own children,” she said.

Jones also spoke about her

personal conflict when deciding
whether to send her daughter to
a predominately white school

Journo talks
educational
disparities,
segregation

Teach-in discusses history of
white supremacy, inaccuracies

CHUN SO/Daily

Matthew Spooner provides insight on politics and the history of white supremacy at the Disrupting White Supremacy Teach In at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Wednesday.

NYTimes’ Nikole Hannah-Jones spoke
on prevalence of racial inqualities

TAL LIPKIN
For the Daily

Event held by University History Department intended to disrupt injustices

On Wednesday evening, the

University of Michigan History
Department
held
a
teach-in

surrounding “Disrupting White
Supremacy:
Global
Histories

and Local Struggles.” The talk
included 12 speakers in an effort
to reclaim and retell the history
of race in the U.S. and globally.
The speeches were followed
by a student “talk back” panel,
focusing
on
the
historical

injustices and their inaccurate
recordings that have shaped our
current political climate.

Views could follow the talk on

twitter and pose questions to the
speakers using the #UMDisrupt.

Teach-ins have a long and

storied history at the University.
The nation’s first “teach-in” took
place on campus in March of 1965
with 3,000 students gathering
across rooms in Angell Hall to
discuss and protest the war in
Vietnam.

Rackham
student
Tara

Weinberg explained the urgency

to come to events like this,
especially with the controversy
surrounding white supremacist
Richard Spencer’s potential visit
to campus next semester.

“I think it’s really important

to counter him because if there
is no counter, then it’s almost
taken as a given that he’s been
received with silence and with
complicity,” Weinberg said.

Several professors and one

graduate student spoke on how the
current political climate has been
shaped from an international,
historical
perspective.

Katherine French, a J. Frederick
Hoffman professor of history,
accompanied
by
Rackham

student Taylor Sims identified
medieval
fantastical
symbols

used by white supremacists in
the Charlottesville protests, and
how their modern use incorrectly
represents the Crusades at large.
This misrepresentation has given
white supremacists an empty
sense of security and support,
and
has
misconstrued
their

presence to the public.

“If you know your history, then

ABBY TAKAS

Daily Staff Reporter

On Feb. 12, Detroit workers

left their jobs and gathered
in Martin Luther King Jr.
Memorial Park to protest for a
$15 statewide minimum wage.
Linked to the 50th anniversary
of the 1968 Memphis sanitation
worker strike, where workers
walked away from their jobs
to protest inadequate pay and
dangerous working conditions,
similar protests were held in
other major cities including
Chicago,
Houston
and

Cleveland.

The movement responsible

for this, Fight for $15, aims to
raise the minimum wage to
$15 and was created when New
York City fast-food workers
led a strike for higher wages
in 2012. Since then, California,
New York and Washington
D.C. have crafted incremental
plans to reach a $15 minimum
wage in the coming years, while
Seattle already implemented
a $15 minimum wage for large
employers this year.

Despite these large national

movements, however, public
opinionis still largely split on
whether a $15 minimum wage is
a good idea.

Charles
Brown,
an

economics professor at the
University of Michigan, worked
on the Minimum Wage Study
Commission from 1979 to 1981
and published several related
papers in the following decades.

While the $15 minimum wage
has been approved in several
notable cities and states, Brown
said he views Detroit as a
different case.

“As a group , these wages are

in more prosperous areas than
Detroit,” Brown said.

Though Detroit is a large city,

its economy lags behind Seattle
or San Francisco according to
the speakers. Wallace Hopp,
a professor of business and
engineering, said the prevailing

wage rate should be considered
when adopting a new state
minimum
wage.
Michigan

just raised its minimum wage
from $8.90 to $9.25 on Jan. 1,
the last step of an incremental
minimum
wage
increase

plan enacted in 2014. When
Seattle began its incremental
minimum wage raise to $15
in 2015, its large employers’
minimum wage was $11, and its
small employers with medical
benefits’ minimum wage was

$10.

“In some cities, like Seattle,

with hot labor markets, low-
wage jobs were much closer to
$15 per hour than in less hot
labor markets like Detroit,”
Hopp said. “So the ability of a
Seattle to absorb an increase
to $15 per hour is much greater
than that of Detroit. Of course,
the cost of living is also lower
in Detroit than Seattle. So the
minimum wage does not need to

The
Office
of
National

Scholarships and Fellowships
announced the winners of the
Gates Cambridge and the Knight-
Hennessy Scholarships Tuesday.

Gates
Cambridge
selected

University
Medical
student

Warren Pan to join the fully-
paid one-year master’s program
plus living stipend at Cambridge
University in England. Knight-
Hennessy selected alum Yiran
Liu
to
pursue
a
doctorate

degree in cancer biology at
Stanford University’s School of
Medicine. Both recipients plan
on beginning their respective
programs in the fall.

Pan graduated from Harvard

University before pursuing his
medical and doctorate degrees
at the University. Pan said he
hopes to be a physician-scientist
working directly with patients
while
continuing
medical

research. Pan will be taking a
one-year leave of absence before
his final year of medical school to
study in Cambridge under Steve
O’Rahilly, the head of the Clinical
Biochemistry Department.

Prestigious
fellowship
recipients
announced

ACADEMICS

Knight-Hennessy, Gates
Cambridge provide one-
year Master’s programs

REMY FARKAS
Daily Staff Reporter

ROSEANNE CHAO/Daily

After protests for $15 minimum wage,
University weighs possible impacts

Protests come after wage increase to $9.25 in beginning of January 2018

JULIA FORD

Daily Staff Reporter

Lindsay Haas, an MDining

Culinary and Nutrition Support
Specialist, met with University
of Michigan students last year
to listen to their concerns over
the lack of healthy beverage
options
at
the
residential

dining halls. After considering
their feedback, Haas decided
to test a new healthy beverage
dispensary machine called Bevi.

A Bevi machine, which offers

students the choice of either still
or sparkling water with four
different flavor options, will
be installed in the South Quad
residential dining hall on Feb.
26, as part of a two-month trial
period.

Haas found many students

were looking for a way to
customize their drinks. Bevi
gives
students
control
over

how much flavor goes into their
drink, with possible options
ranging from lemon lime to
blueberry cucumber. All flavors
are zero calories, unsweetened
or naturally sweetened. The
machine functions through a
touch-screen, and ingredient

Dining hall
introduces
sparkling
beverages

BUSINESS

After popular demand,
South Quad to trial new
machine called Bevi

NATASHA PIETRUSHKA

Daily Staff Reporter

See WAGES, Page 3

See ONSP, Page 3
See MDINING, Page 3

See HANNAH-JONES, Page 3
See TEACH-IN, Page 3

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