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February 13, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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After
the
Detroit
Free

Press claimed the University
of
Michigan
invested

portions of its endowment in
companies owned by major
donors, students are calling
for the University to be more
transparent
in
where
and

how it spends its funds. The
University’s Chapter of College
Democrats and the Roosevelt
Institute, a student-run policy
think tank, came together
to author a Central Student
Government
resolution

requesting an investigation into
possible conflicts of interest by
the University, more oversight
into
investments
from
the

elected Board of Regents and
more transparency from the
University overall.

The Free Press’ investigation

raised
doubts
about
the

University
Investment

Advisory
Committee’s

intentions
when
choosing

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, February 13, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 75
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

ACADEMICS

With about two months

left
until
the
Lecturers’

Employee
Organization’s

current contract ends on April
20, the union’s bargaining
team
continues
to
meet

weekly
with
a
University

delegation to negotiate a new
agreement regarding wages,
performance
evaluations

and other factors. In a closed
bargaining
session
at
the

Administrative
Services

Building Monday night, the
University responded to a
salary
proposal
that
had

been submitted at the end of
October, offering an increase
of $1,000 to the starting pay,
according to the LEO blog.

Founded
in
2003,
LEO

represents
approximately

1,700
non-tenure
faculty

among
the
University
of

Michigan’s three campuses.
LEO’s
principal
demands

include
better
pay,
more

benefits and improved job

security.

The University originally

planned to offer its own
salary proposal Friday at an
open bargaining session in
Dearborn, but the event was
canceled due to inclement
weather. A shorter meeting
was scheduled for Monday to
make up for lost time.

LEO
President
Ian

Robinson, Lecturer in the
Sociology Department, said
the
University
delivered

its response “earlier than
has typically been the case
in
bargaining,”
a
change

he
regards
as
a
positive

development.

“The U of M bargaining

team began by telling us
that they think the current
contract is great and they see
no need to make major changes
to any of it,” Robinson said.
“Of course, that’s an opening
stance, and in bargaining, you
never start by saying what you
are prepared to do.”

According
to
LEO,
the

minimum
salary
in
Ann

LEO and ‘U’
negotiate as


contract end
looms closer

Coping in the classroom: Chronic
illness alters academic experiences

Coping in the
Classroom

SSD served

14% 3rd

2,708

students
came in with a
chronic illness

most
common
condition

seen by SSD

CASEY TIN/Daily

In a closed session, ‘U’ offers $1,000
increase in starting salaries for lecturers

LEAH GRAHAM
Daily Staff Reporter

University students with invisible illnesses navigate layers of conflicts in class

For
students
like
LSA

sophomore Sari Grossman, who
suffers from Crohn’s disease
— a chronic gastrointestinal
ailment resulting in frequent
complications and trips to the
bathroom — not a moment goes
by without the thought her
disease might flare up during
class or a test. Public Health
junior
Madison
Polay
has

similar worries during the day

while coping with her Type 1
diabetes. Polay always makes
sure she carries enough snacks
just in case her blood sugar
drops, leaving her dizzy and
unable to concentrate in class.

“I always make sure I am

eating
regularly,
food
with

carbs so my blood (sugar) goes
up and I try and get it higher so
my pump isn’t alarming when
my blood sugar is going low,”
Polay said. “I have to make
sure that I am stocked with
juice boxes and snacks in my
backpack.”

“Invisible”
diseases
that

afflict
students,
including

Crohn’s, colitis, diabetes, Lyme
disease, mental health illnesses
and more, often go unnoticed.
Many
of
these
diseases

require students to alter their
academic routines in order to
be successful at the University
of Michigan.

The Office of Services for

Students
with
Disabilities

helps
accommodate
these

students’
needs
and
works

with
University
faculty
to

ensure
their
conditions
do

not
impede
their
academic

abilities
through
testing

accommodations,
note-taking

services, real-time translations
and more. According to the SSD
2016-2017 annual report, the
office served 2,708 students,
14 percent of whom suffer
from a chronic illness, making
chronic illness the third most
common condition seen by SSD.
According to Megan Marshall,
coordinator
of
services

for
students
with
chronic

health conditions, visual and

REMY FARKAS
Daily Staff Reporter

On Monday night, a group

of five current and former
southeastern
Michigan

legislators spoke to a crowd
of about 40 students in the
Ford School of Public Policy’s
Annenberg
Auditorium,

answering
questions
about

issues
currently
affecting

the University of Michigan
community.
Questions

concerned tuition and housing
affordability, sexual assault and
harassment on campus, diversity
and inclusion on campus, and
the state of Michigan’s economic
environment.

In response to a question

about the 7.2 percent increase
in the average cost of attending
a four-year college, panelist
and state Rep. Adam Zemke,
D-Ann Arbor, raised the issue
of state budgetary cuts instead
of public higher education as a
contributor to the rising rate of
tuition. According to Zemke,
tuition has been rising at the
same time state aid has been
decreasing.

“There’s a direct and inverse

relationship between the time
when Michigan started de-
investing the state aid to our
public universities and the rise
in tuition,” Zemke said. “And it’s
literally when I say it’s a direct
and inverted relationship, the
line is the same slope in the
opposite direction.”

State Rep. Yousef Rabhi,

D-Ann
Arbor,
who
sits

on
the
Higher
Education

Subcommittee
for
Budget

Appropriations,
added
that

many
factors
contribute
to

rising
tuitions,
including
a

general rise in the cost of living.
He also expanded on Zemke’s
comment about state budgetary
appropriations,
saying
state

appropriation for the University,
which was cut by 15 percent in
2011, has not recovered to its
former levels when adjusting for
inflation.

“In my ideal world, we

would go even further than
that; we would have free public
universities
and
community

colleges,” Rabhi said.

State Sen. Rebekah Warren,

D-Ann Arbor, named several
possible policies that could
control rising costs or help
students with financial aid,
including more comprehensive
tax
deductions
for
interest

on loans and a package of
bills currently in the state
senate
intended
to
create

an
ombudsman,
an
official

dedicated to helping students
navigate the world of student
loans.

Warren also discussed her

work on policy relating to
campus sexual assault.

“I’ve had the opportunity for

the last couple years to work
with first lady Sue Snyder and
colleagues in both the house and
the senate on a campus sexual
assault prevention task force,”
Warren
said.
“We’ve
been
Mark
Hoeltzel,
a
former

University of Michigan pediatric
rheumatology
specialist,
was

arrested at Detroit Metropolitan
Airport Monday morning on
charges of child pornography. He
was returning from an out-of-
state trip, but has been under FBI
investigation since December.

Hoeltzel was initially under

investigation for a two year long
sexual relationship with one of
his female patients, who was
only 17 years old when she began
receiving care from Hoeltzel for
her rheumatoid arthritis, while
also, according to court records,
having various mental health
diagnoses. According to records
unsealed in U.S discrict court,
Hoetzel gave the patient pain
pills she didn’t need, talked to her
about other “hot” female patients
who were as young as twelve years
old and visited her apartment for
sex.

After a house search warrant

issued on Dec. 11, law enforcement
officials found a flash drive
with over 200 images of child
pornography. Files were created

Ex- ‘U’ doc
arrested on
charges of
child porn

CRIME

Hoeltzel under FBI probe
for sex with 17-year-old
patient, claims consensual

KATHERINA SOURINE

Daily Staff Reporter

DARBY STIPE/Daily

Debbie and John Dingell answer student questions on a panel at the Ford School of Public Policy Monday.

Michigan representatives talk campus,
community issues at Ford School panel

Rising tuition, state budget cuts and #MeToo topic of Monday night discussion

ALON SAMUEL
Daily Staff Reporter

See PANEL, Page 3

See HOELTZEL, Page 3
See ENDOWMENT, Page 3

See SSD, Page 3
See LEO, Page 2

University
funds focus
of student
resolution

ADMINISTRATION

College Dems, Roosevelt
Institute call for further
endowment transparency

MOLLY NORRIS

& MATT HARMON

Daily Staff Reporter
& Daily News Editor

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