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February 05, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Anne Berg, a University of

Michigan lecturer of History,
and Rackham student Andrea
Gillespie discussed the facts
and stigmas of the current
refugee crisis at a dinner and
lecture Saturday evening at
Rackham Assembly Hall. The
Michigan Refugee Assistance
Program hosted the event,
which illustrated the details
of the refugee resettlement
process and the impacts of the
Trump administration on the
crisis.

Gillespie, the vice president of

external affairs of MRAP, works
with many refugee resettlement

organizations
and
currently

focuses on refugee and forced
displacement studies. Gillespie
stated there are 22.5 million
refugees currently registered
with the United Nations High
Commissioner for Refugees,
and 20 people are displaced
every minute.

According
to
Gillespie,

most refugees leave the top
“source” countries of Syria
and Afghanistan with the goal
of fleeing to host countries,
including Turkey and Pakistan.
Lebanon is also a major host
country — she stated one in four
people in Lebanon are refugees.

The
Ann
Arbor
Police

Department is recommending
Scorekeepers –– a bar which,
thanks to its popularity among
University of Michigan students,
is the most Ubered-to destination
in the state of Michigan — lose
its liquor license when it expires
on April 30, according to a report
from MLive.

The recommendation, made

at the Jan. 12 meeting of the
Council Liquor License Review
Committee, was based on the
more than 150 service calls to
the bar in 2017. According to a
memo signed by AAPD Sergeant
Bill Clock and presented to the
committee at its Feb. 2 meeting,
the AAPD also filed 81 case
reports for the location last year.
Case reports, Clock wrote, are
made for all criminal violations
“and
some
non-criminal

offenses.”

The memo lists the content

of several reports, including
one in which an officer issued
Minor in Possession citations
to
two
patrons
who
were

drinking though each had an
“X” written on their hands by
bar staff, indicating they were
minors.
In
another
report,

officers discovered the bar was
displaying an expired liquor
license, and in a third, officers
issued an MIP to a patron who
they determined had never been
asked for identification by staff.

“Based on the number of

overall incidents in 2017, and the
listed violations, The Ann Arbor
Police Department does not
support renewal of this liquor
license,” Clock wrote.

One student, who requested

to remain anonymous out of
fear of legal consequences, said
Skeeps’ reputation as a haven for
underage customers was widely
known. The bouncers were strict
about asking for ID, the student
said, but not always as strict about

making sure it was genuine.

“Everyone basically at Skeeps

is underage, but they use a fake
ID to get in,” the student said.
“Everyone shows some sort of ID,
whether it’s a fake ID or someone
else’s ID, to get in.”

The bar has also received

attention for its practice of
selling “Skeeps cards” –– $3,000
cards that give their owners VIP
status, allowing them to cut the
line and enter without providing

proof of age. According to a 2014
Spoon University article, the
Skeeps card was originally given
to patrons who accumulated a
$1,000 tab and tipped 20 percent,
but the bar had to raise the price
several times to match demand.
The anonymous student said
she bought a Skeeps card her
freshman year.

As of January 2018, students

minoring in Community Action
and Social Change through the
School of Social Work are now
eligible for a Poverty Solutions,
Action & Engagement certificate.
The certificate is sponsored by
Poverty Solutions — an initiative
that
seeks
to
develop
new

strategies to fight poverty — and
would allow for a more focused
study within the CASC minor with
additional resources from Poverty
Solutions.

Because Poverty Solutions is

a multidisciplinary initiative on
campus, it adds and strengthens
programs
already
available

on campus. Julia Weinert, the
assistant
director
of
Poverty

Solutions, said the CASC minor
coordinated well with the initiative
because they had similar goals.

“We partnered with the CASC

minor,” Weinert said. “They’re
very much aligned with their
mission and their work to identify
ways to act on issues of social
justice.”

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, February 5, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Student org
hosts talk to
destigmatize
refugee crisis

All four Democratic candidates
for governor debate in Ann Arbor

AHAD BOOTWALA/Daily

2018 Michigan Democratic gubernatorial candidates wait to speak at the Deomcratic gubernatorial forum at Washtenaw County’s Learning Resources Center
Saturday.

CAMPUS LIFE

Michigan Refugees Assistance Program
talks resettlement process, criminalization

REMY FARKAS
Daily Staff Reporter

Candidates talk politicians failing the working-class, field constituent questions

The state of Michigan’s 2018

Democratic
gubernatorial

candidates
gathered
at

Washtenaw County’s Learning
Resources Center on Saturday
morning
while
attendees

packed the hallway, exceeding
the
venue’s
250-person

capacity.
The
candidates,

William Cobbs, Shri Thanedar,
Gretchen Whitmer and Abdul
El-Sayed, answered audience
questions
regarding
their

economic, environmental and
health care policies.

Candidates
differed
on

several points of policy during
the debate, but all claimed the
state of Michigan has failed its
working-class constituents in
recent years, often taking aim
at Republican Gov. Rick Snyder
and the GOP-led legislature for
these failures.

On
the
economy,
most

candidates
the
decried
tax

cuts and abatements for large
corporations during Snyder’s
governorship as a failed policy.
Cobbs, former vice president
for
Xerox,
supported
this

sentiment.

ALON SAMUEL
Daily Staff Reporter

Certificate
available
for CASC
students

ACADEMICS

Community Action and
Social Change minor
collaborates on program

SAYALI AMIN
Daily Staff Reporter

ALEC COHEN/Daily

The Ann Arbor Police Department recommends that Scorekeepers, a bar popular with University students, lose its
liquor license when it expires on April 30th.

AAPD says Skeeps should lose liquor
license after 156 incidents in 2017

Review committee will decide whether to renew license expiring April 30

ANDREW HIYAMA

Daily News Editor

Gutting one out

Michigan escaped with a
76-73 overtime win over
Minnesota on Saturday

» Page 1B

Following
controversy

surrounding the Michigan State
University Board of Trustees, state
Rep. James Lower, R-Cedar Lake,
introducedlegislation Thursday to
change the way higher education
board members are elected.

Currently, members of the

state Board of Education and
the boards of the University of
Michigan, MSU and Wayne State
University are selected through a
statewide popular vote after being
nominated by political parties.
For many other universities in
Michigan, board positions are
already appointed by the governor.

If
the
legislation
passes,

Michigan’s
three
biggest

universities would be under more
government control through a
constitutional
amendment.
It

requires a two-thirds majority
vote
in
the
Michigan
State

Congress to be put on a ballot.

The plan would call for the

boards to be terminated at the end
of 2018, allowing the governor to
appoint eight members on Jan. 1,
2019. The state Senate would be
able to provide advice and consent.

See VOTERS, Page 2

Bill drafted
to let Gov.,
not voters,
pick boards

GOVERNMENT

Proposal comes in wake
of Larry Nassar case,
outrage against MSU

CARLY RYAN
Daily News Editor

Read more online at

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michigandaily.com

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 69
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

SPORTS.......................1B
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