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December 05, 2017 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily

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City Council was rocked

again
Monday
night
as

residents continued to show
resistance
against
a
$146

million
development
plan

on
Broadway
Street,
near

the University of Michigan
Hospital.

It
was
the
culmination

of yet another episode in
the
divisions
that
have

characterized
Ann
Arbor

politics
in
recent
years.

Though most council members
agree increasing density and
housing supply are crucial for
the city’s development, some
residents fear the character
of their neighborhoods will be
changed for the worse.

At
contention
was

whether to switch the zoning
designation of the Broadway
site
from
Planned
Unit

Development
to
Campus

Business Residential District,
or C1A/R. Proponents of the
switch, like Councilmember
Chip Smith, D-Ward 5, say
C1A/R is will provide seamless
integration
for
high-rises

to the surrounding campus
community.

“The campus has expanded

pretty greatly over the last
two decades. I think it’s
disingenuous to say that the
Medical Campus is not part
of the University complex and
therefore it shouldn’t count
(under C1A/R),” Smith said.

However,
the
highrises

Smith is envisioning under
C1A/R is the exact type of
situation many residents who
live on or near Broadway Street
would want to avoid. There
have been numerous rounds of
negotiations between the city,
residents
and
Morningside

— the developer that also
owns the land — on what the
final development will look
like, some residents are still

disgruntled. One resident said
having
a
downtown-sized

building in a quieter low-rise
neighborhood would never be
a prudent idea.

Another
resident,
Steve

Kaplan,
questioned
the

amount of commercial activity
that
a
C1A/R
designation

would bring, arguing that
businesses must gather around
an area organically.

“We could build the hollow

boxes on the street and then
hope for another decade they
would fill up with hat shops
and bodegas,” he said. “I don’t
think they’re going to come.”

When a pro-development

resident
criticized
those

opposed to the development
as not thinking about long-
term benefits and called them
“NIMBYs,”
condemnation

came
quickly
from
all

Rosie the Robot Maid in “The

Jetsons” and R2-D2 in “Star
Wars” are highly advanced robots
that can clean, prepare meals and
even send secret messages. While
the robots of today have not yet
reached this level of intelligence,
Dmitry Berenson and Jason Corso,
associate professors of electrical
engineering and computer science,
are working with teams of graduate
students in the hopes that they one
day will.

Their
current
research,

supported by the Toyota Research
Institute,
involves
developing

algorithms to make a robot able
to search for and find objects in
assortments
of
several
items.

They refer to the project as
“Manipulating Piles of stuff.”

Berenson’s group focuses on the

motion-planning and manipulation
components — figuring out how to
make the robot actually move the
objects. Corso’s group focuses on
the robot’s perception of the objects
and the surrounding environment.

Rackham
student
Abhishek

Venkataraman, who works with
Corso’s team, emphasized the

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, December 5, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 42
©2017 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

See ROBOTS, Page 3

‘U’ groups
developing
household
friendly AI

RESEARCH

Engineering team finds
success with robotic arms
to boost accessibility tech

LIZZY LAWRENCE

Daily Staff Reporter

ARNOLD ZHOU/Daily

Ann Arbor City Council and the public convene for the City Council meeting in Council Hall Tuesday.

City Council, residents demonstrate
resistance against new developments

Questions of zoning, cost continue to surface in contentious council meetings

ISHI MORI

Daily Staff Reporter

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See CITY, Page 3

Michigan is one of eight states

in the country with more opioid
prescriptions than people. As a part
of a public awareness campaign,
the University of Michigan has
organized an online teach-out
course to deleve into the roots of
the crisis—the freee course opened
for public access Monday.

James DeVaney, associate vice

provost for Academic Innovation,
explained University teach-outs
are done in a collaborative effort
from a variety of departments
throughout the school and offer
a platform on which faculty,
students and global audiences can
communicate through.

“The opioid epidemic is a perfect

topic for the U-M Teach-Out
Series,” he said. “It is a complex
problem
that
requires
wide-

ranging expertise in order to begin
to develop meaningful solutions. It
is a discussion that is strengthened
by experts at U-M and the lived
experiences of public learners
around the world.”

Opioids are commonly known

painkillers that have a high rate
of addiction, abuse and overdose.

See TEACH-IN, Page 3

New teach-
out to delve
into opioid
epidemic

ACADEMICS

Participants, experts to
explore national health
emergency in free course

RENATA TERRAZZAN

For The Daily

University
of
Michigan

police officers are currently
investigating
an
armed

robbery that occurred Monday
night in West Quad Residence
Hall. Three unknown male
suspects were involved in
the incident with three other
student
victims,
according

to Division of Public Safety
and Security spokeswoman
Diane Brown. The suspects
fled from West Quad, but
their
whereabouts
remain

unknown.

Brown said a gun was

brandished
and
property

was demanded in the assault.
Around 9 p.m., Brown said,
three unknown students were
in a resident room in West
Quad. An hour later, two of
those students were physically
beaten by the suspects, though
it remains unclear who exactly
was party to the assault.

Police were notified around

10:30 p.m.

Residents
were
initially

asked to stay in their rooms
as a precaution in both West
Quad and South Quad — as a
possible person of interest was
initially wrongly suspected to
be in the latter residence hall
— but as of late Monday night,
residents were free to move
around.

“There is no lockdown,

and no shooter,” Pieknik said.
“We are still investigating
… residents are OK to move
around.”

Resident advisers in both

halls
speculating
about

the incident initially asked
residents to stay in their
rooms,
close
their
blinds

and turn off lights. These
preliminary
precautions

were lifted by DPSS shortly
thereafter.

West Quad resident Carola

Jansohn, an LSA freshman,
said she did not hear about the
robbery until she saw officers
in the South Quad lobby.

“They said it was an armed

robbery
and
he
escaped,”

3 suspects at
large for role
in robbery at
West Quad

Bipartisan panel on tax reform
contends with hasty Congress bill

See CRIME, Page 3

ALEXANDRIA POMPEI/Daily

University President Mark Schlissel, Former Republican Congressman Dave Camp, and Public Policy Dean Michael Barr discuss the federal tax reforms in Annen-
berg Auditorium Monday.

CRIME

Unknown males reportedly brandished
gun, demanded property from 3 students

RIYAH BASHA
Daily News Editor

Despite GOP support, many worry bill will hurt low-income families, graduate students

With a new tax bill on the

horizon, the Ford School of Public
Policy organized a panel on tax
reform with Public Policy dean
Michael S. Barr and former U.S. Rep.
Dave Camp, R-Mich., moderated by
University of Michigan President
Mark Schlissel.

The
panel,
which
was

arranged earlier in the semester,
coincidentally
took
place

Monday afternoon just as House

Republicans passed their version of
the tax reform bill mid-November
and Senate Republicans passed
their
version
early
Saturday

morning.

Camp served in the House of

Representatives from 1991 to 2015,
and as chairman of the House
Committee on Ways and Means
from 2011 to 2015. Barr served
as the U.S. Department of the
Treasury assistant secretary for
financial institutions in 2009 and
2010.

The panelists discussed different

aspects of the tax reform bills — the

corporate income tax, impacts on
higher education — as well as bills’
potential and expected economic
impacts, and what happens next.

“Right now, we’ll be looking at

a conference committee and that’s
typically what happens after a bill
passes. Under our system, the exact
same language has to pass both the
House and the Senate before it’s
sent to the president,” Camp said.
“These bills are different in many
ways, so they’ll have a conference
committee. Now I think this will
be a relatively short conference
committee because they’re on

this time deadline. And the time
deadline really is (regarding) the
election in Alabama, that they don’t
want to lose any votes.”

As chairman of the House

Committee on Ways and Means,
Camp worked on the Tax Reform
Bill of 2014, which was never signed
into law. He said the bipartisanship
in writing the 2014 bill differed
from the recent bills that have been
passed along party lines in the
House and the Senate.

The proposed reduction of the

corporate tax rate has been a key

COLIN BERESFORD

Daily Staff Reporter

See TAX, Page 3

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