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October 20, 2017 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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University
of
Michigan

hockey players will suit up
Friday evening for the first
time on the newly coined
Red Berenson Ice Rink. The
University’s Board of Regents
voted unanimously Thursday to
name the rink at Yost Ice Arena
after Berenson, who served as
the team’s coach for 33 seasons
and retired this summer.

The rink will feature his

signature through the end of
the calendar year, while center
ice will change to display
Berenson’s name next year.
The Board and other executive
officers
gave
Berenson
a

standing ovation at the meeting.

“Going to Michigan was

the best four years of my life,”
he said. “I have spent the past
33 years trying to help others
achieve their dreams.”

The
Board
met
at
the

University
of
Michigan
at

Flint, and executive officers
spent the day in briefings
on the state of the campus.
Aside from brief comments by
U-M Flint Chancellor Susan
Borrego at the beginning of the
meeting, the lingering water
crisis did not figure heavily into
the agenda. Robert Barnett,
dean of the U-M Flint School
of
Education,
presented
a

program to launch soon that
will train Flint high schoolers
to be certified early childhood
educators by their high school

graduation.
Endowment rises by 13.8
percent

The University’s long-term

investment profile grew by 13.8
percent in the 2017 fiscal year
to total $10.9 billion, up from
$9.7 billion last year. After a
dip last year Vice President of
Development Jerry May said
positive returns on investments
and the Victors for Michigan
Campaign contributed to the

push.

The
fund’s
performance

this year places the University
ninth among all universities
and colleges in the country,
and the third highest public
school system — after those
of California and Virginia, as
confirmed in a press release.

University Spokesman Rick

Fitzgerald
noted,
however,

the endowment lags behind
private institutions on a per-

student basis, ranking 86th in
the nation.

“(The
University’s

endowment is) much smaller
than many private school peers,
while supporting a much larger
number of students,” he wrote
in an email.

Distributions to the general

fund grew by $21 million to
$325 million in the fiscal year.
May pointed to Victors for

The
HERCULES
laser,
a

scientific instrument used to
study
particle
physics
that’s

housed in the University of
Michigan’s Center for Ultrafast
Optical Science, is getting a
power upgrade after receiving
a $2 million donation from the
National
Science
Foundation.

HERCULES currently holds the
Guinness World Record for being
the highest intensity focused
laser, but this upgrade provides
even
more
opportunity
for

advancement.

The laser can utilize this power

for only fractions of a second,
but the scale of this power is
immense. To give the power
a frame of reference, Anatoly
Maksimchuk, a research scientist
in CUOS, compared the laser’s
power to all power available in the
United States’ grid.

“The whole grid of the United

States is only one terawatt,”
Maksimchuk said. “With our
laser, in one room, you have 300
terawatts. So compared to the
whole grid of the U.S., it is 300
times more just in a single room.”

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, October 20, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 13
©2017 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CROS SWO R D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

See LASER, Page 3A

University
laser to get
$2 million
upgrades

RESEARCH

The HERCULES laser
is used to study particle
physics in the CUOS

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE

For the Daily

DANYEL THARAKAN/Daily

The University Board of Regents shares a laugh at their meeting in Flint Thursday.

ILLUSTRATION BY ROSEANNE CHAO

Regents vote on Red Berenson Ice
Rink, endowment increase at meeting

The meeting on UM’s Flint campus also featured a discussion on C.C. Little

RIYAH BASHA
Daily News Editor

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See REGENTS, Page 3A

On the afternoon of the

University
of
Michigan
vs.

Michigan
State
University

football
game,
a
University

student was attacked and beaten
outside of East Quad Residence
Hall, on the corner of Church and
Hill Streets — next to the Alpha
Epsilon Phi sorority house. The
student, who wishes to remain
anonymous, sustained serious
injuries including a concussion
and a broken nose after the
attack, but has since returned to
school.

The student’s father, who also

asked to remain anonymous
while the incident is under
investigation, said his son was
standing with a group of friends
outside East Quad that afternoon.
Earlier in the day, a group of men
had allegedly harassed a certain
member of his son’s group who
did not attend the University. The
men returned later and a physical
altercation broke out between
the two groups. According to
the father, one of the attackers
blindsided his son and the fight
became focused on him.

See CRIME, Page 3A

‘U’ student
attacked on
Hill before
State game

CRIME

The family is offering a
$10,000 reward for any
info on, video of attackers

MATT HARMON
Daily Staff Reporter

Though any game day in Ann

Arbor is bound to witness its
fair share of police activity, the
game against Michigan State
University on Oct. 7 — the first
night game since 2014, and
against one of the University
of Michigan’s biggest rivals —
was certain to see more. Still,
several arrests and citations
made at tailgates hosted by Black
and Latino fraternities have
members objecting to the lack
of communication they have
with police — and aggressive
tactics therein — as compared
to older, predominantly white
fraternities.

There
were
at
least
six

citations given out at the houses
associated with Kappa Alpha Psi,
a historically Black fraternity,
and Latino fraternity Lambda
Theta Phi house. At least two of
the citations involved arrests,
according to Ann Arbor Police
Department
reports
of
the

incident retrieved by a Freedom

of Information Act request. The
citations were for disturbing
public
peace,
creating
a

nuisance, obstructing police and
contributing to noise.

All 10 predominantly white

fraternities surveyed by the Daily
reported no police presence
or citations at house tailgates
hosted Oct. 7.

According to the police report,

officers were alerted to the party
by a text from a student.

“(Reporting party) GOT A

TEXT FROM A STUDENT
REF A LARGE CROWD IFO
(in front of) THIS HOUSE. RP
IS NOT ON SCENE; STUDENT
SHE GOT A TEXT FROM IS A
PASSERBY,” the report read.

Police reported there were

approximately
1,000
people

blocking the street in front of
the Lambda Theta Phi house
when they arrived. They then
encountered one of the hosts
of the party, who told them his
party had gotten out of hand and
he couldn’t clear people out, and
he was subsequently cited with
disturbance of public peace.

Certain frats
see increase
in policing
at tailgates

Amid search
for housing,

students want

See POLICING, Page 3A

CRIME
CAMPUS LIFE

Minority frats given several citations,
white fraternies report no police presence

RIYAH BASHA
Daily News Editor

Management companies evade Ann Arbor ordinance
with leasing reservations, early deposits and signings

Upon arriving an hour and a half

before the Prime Student Housing
office opened Monday, Engineering
junior Henry Burns was greeted by
a sprawling line of almost 40 people
who had beat him in his efforts to
reserve an apartment.

The long line so far in advance

of the office’s opening was the first

indication of some off-campus
properties attempting to navigate
city ordinances to beat out their
competitors.

“This is the first day that you

could reserve a spot for signing a
lease because leases aren’t allowed
to be signed until November 10,”
Burns said at the leasing office. “A
lot of places get around it by having
you sign a reservation earlier than
that actual sign date, and this is the
first day you’re allowed to sign a
reservation and their office opened
at 9 so people started getting
here several hours beforehand.
I heard people camped out and

everything.”

Students who were already

residents of Prime Student Housing
were allowed to place new deposits
as early as Oct. 13 and have the
opportunity to renew a current
lease up until 5 p.m. on Friday —
afterward the market will open for
anyone to sign for the apartment.

However, the office opened

to the general public for deposits
four days early on Monday. Only
after deposits were placed would
students be allowed to view
their prospective apartments or
residences, unless they had the
chance to see the apartment of their
own accord.

Some currently-leasing students

received an email regarding the
deposit opportunity with Prime
on Monday, while others did not.
Those who did not receive the
email were informed of this date
because they called the office
prior to Monday, also of their own
volition.

According to Business freshman

Adya Pandey, Prime residences are
in high demand due to their many
different locations and relatively
inexpensive pricing.

“I know that they have 20 other

properties so it’s really popular and
it’s really competitive because it’s
cheap,” Pandey said.

A majority of students who

planned to lease through Prime
began waiting in line as early as
2 a.m., though many cited a few
students who were waiting since 10
p.m. the night before.

During her three hour wait in

line at the Prime Student Housing
office,
LSA
freshman
Rachel

Westrick
expressed
confusion

about Prime’s policies and the dates
that students could place deposits.

“We called a while ago and they

told us that the 23rd was the day
that all the renewals were due,
so that was the day that everyone
would come,” Westrick said. “But
then my mom checked a while back
and they said you could just drop
off a deposit whenever you wanted,
to reserve a spot. So we came today
and so I guess there was a line today.
I don’t really understand that.”

Those who waited overnight at

Prime to place a deposit were not
all guaranteed housing; many —
when finally through the door —

MORGAN SHOWEN &

ALEXA ST. JOHN
Daily Staff Reporter &
Managing News Editor

See HOUSING, Page 3A

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