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October 03, 2017 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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A recent study conducted

by
University
of
Michigan

researchers has found 20 percent
of adolescents and teenagers have
sustained a concussion at least
once.

This
research
project

was directed under the 2016
Monitoring the Future study, a
broader project conducted under
the University, which explores the
behaviors of American students
from
kindergarten
through

university level. This study is
funded by the National Institute
on Drug Abuse and is conducted
by
the
Institute
for
Social

Research at the University.

This specific study, “Prevalence

of
Concussion
Among
US

Adolescents
and
Correlated

Factors,” was conducted using

data from the MTF 2016 survey,
a project that occurs annually and
conducts an in-school survey in
grades 8, 10, and 12. In this 2016
survey, 49.8 percent of students
were male and 46.8 percent were
white. The age range of students
surveyed was 12-18 years old, the
modal age being 16 years old.

University researcher Philip

T. Veliz, one of the authors of the
report, explained this data has had
an important role in solidifying a
base knowledge on this issue.

“Part of this study was finding a

baseline number of what the self-
reported/diagnosed concussion is
within the adolescent population,
and then starting to track it,” Veliz
said.

He
emphasized
the

implications of this research
will only be inferable with time,
as they continue to survey and
record whether there are long-

The
Senate
Advisory

Committee
on
University

Affairs
met
on
Monday

to
discuss
methods
of

encouraging more interaction
in meetings, budget concerns
and award recipients. SACUA
also
mentioned
possible

solutions
to
the
textbook

availability problem campus
faced at the beginning of the
semester.

Members first spoke about

ways to improve the structure
of
meetings.
To
address

comments made in previous
Senate
Assembly
meetings,

members considered moving
meeting locations to rooms
more conducive to interactive
discussion. Rooms in Rackham
Graduate
Building
were

suggested, which led to a
motion
to
re-examine
the

committee’s budget.

The discussion then turned

to the issue students had buying
books at the beginning of the
semester, specifically with the
relocation of Ulrich’s. SACUA
Senate Secretary David Potter,
a classical studies professor,
believes
the
University
of

Michigan needs to handle the
textbook availability problem
better, as it created difficulties
for students.

“We need to discuss the

failure
of
the
University

to react to changes in the
bookstore
market;
Ulrich’s

closed and students were left
to find books whatever way
they could,” Potter said. “Not
having bookstores on campus
where students can buy used
books is putting our students
at a grave disadvantage.”

SACUA
Chair
Robert

Ortega, a professor in the
School of Social Work, agreed
with Potter and noted the
impact the problem had on
faculty as well.

“What
happens
to
the

faculty
is
they’re
moving

forward while students are
still trying to get books,”
Ortega said. “It’s a dilemma for
instructors as well.”

To combat the problem,

members mentioned a central
location for students to pick
up books, focusing more on
electronic books and having
a library representative talk
to the assembly. They also

suggested
a
University-run

bookstore
to
alleviate
the

issues caused by privately
owned bookstores. Students
picketed administratrors for
a
student-run
bookstrore

through
the
`70s
due
to

exorbitant textbook costs, but
those calls died down as the
online market due.

Members
moved
on
to

the
Faculty
Undergraduate

While most University of

Michigan students spend their
gamedays tailgating, Business
sophomore Gabi de Coster
spends her Saturdays going
back home to Grosse Pointe,
Mich., to work on crafting
scents for her aromatherapy
company, MONTA.

MONTA is a health-and-

wellness business that utilizes
all-natural products to create
unique products like scented
rollerballs, bath soaks and
body sprays.

“I’m taking inspiration from

the place the products are
named after and translating
that into scent,” de Coster said.
“It’s the colors, feelings and
emotions that I tie to those
important places in my life that
are relayed in the plants I use
to make the scents.”

Originating in a South Quad

Residence Hall dorm room,
MONTA now has a dedicated
studio in de Coster’s home.
The extra space was needed
to keep up with additional
products and rising demands,

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, October 3, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 2
©2017 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CROS SWO R D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

SPORTS.........................8

Study finds
high rates of
concussions
in American
adolescents

City Council urges community to
unite after local, national incidents

See SURVEY, Page 3

AYUSH THAKUR/Daily

Ann Arbor residents listen to speakers at the City Council meeting in City Hall Monday.

RESEARCH

20 percent of teenagers have sustained
head injuries, underscoring role of sports

KATHERINA SOURINE

Daily Staff Reporter

Council members demand expedited installation of parking garage protective railing

City Council was held in a

somber mood Monday after a
gunman killed 59 people in Las
Vegas and a 56-year old man
fell from the parking structure
at the corner of South Fourth
Avenue
and
East
William

Street.

Mayor Christopher Taylor

expressed frustration at the

lack of coordinated response
to the Las Vegas incident, the
deadliest mass shooting in U.S.
history.

“The fact that this occurs

in our country, I believe it is a
national disgrace,” Taylor said.
“Other nations are able to deal
with it as a matter of culture, a
matter of legislation. I believe
we should do so as well.”

He also lamented the incident

at
the
parking
structure,

the third in a month after a

22-year-old man also fell from
the same parking lot Sept. 7 and
an 81-year-old man was found
dead in the Huron River Sept.
20.

“It is a tragedy of mental

illness, of community health,”
Taylor said. “It’s something
we need to focus on. We need
to make sure that people who
apply for help receive them.”

Councilmember
Chuck

Warpehoski,
D-Ward
5,

urged residents to engage in

community
activities
that

will distract from the sadness
and forge bonds with other
residents.

“This has been a heavy day

for a lot of us in the community,”
Warpehoski said. “In heavy
times like these, it’s important
to find things that give us life.”

Warpehoski added there are

signs of hope. He explained
the city is going to expedite
the installation of railing on

ISHI MORI

Daily Staff Reporter

Student-run
business
enjoys nat’l
successes

BUSINESS

MONTA aromatherapy
started in dorm room, now
sold at Urban Outfitters

CORY ZAYANCE
Daily Staff Reporter

JOSHUA HAN/DAILY

Faculty government pushes for ‘U’
resources for textbook affordability

Noting poor access and high costs, SACUA proposes University-run bookstore

CORY ZAYANCE
Daily Staff Reporter

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See COUNCIL, Page 3

LSA sophomore Jane Sheedy

came to school this fall excited to
start composting in her off-campus
apartment. Her hometown doesn’t
offer composting services and after
learning about harmful methane
release that results from putting
organic materials into landfills last
year, she was thrilled to learn Ann
Arbor does.

“We’ve got some mixing bowls

in our freezer and any time we’ve
got something compostable, we
put it in there,” Sheedy said. “So
vegetable scraps or if something
goes moldy… or something like
that. And when that’s full, there’s a
bin behind our apartment complex
that we can just empty the bowl
into.”

From there, the city of Ann

Arbor takes over. A roadside pick-
up service picks up the compost
much like it picks up regular trash
or recycling and takes it to the city’s
compost facility located only about
five miles from campus.

As it turns out, the facility is also

the site of a local controversy.

In 2010, the city of Ann Arbor

decided to award its compost

See WASTE, Page 3
See MONTA, Page 3

See SACUA, Page 3

A2 compost
company
accused of
negligence

CITY

Competing waste firm
accuses WeCare of site
and contract violations

MAYA GOLDMAN

Daily Staff Reporter

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