100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 13, 2017 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

In an effort to increase

awareness
of
sexual
assault

on campus, members of the
Sexual
Assault
Prevention

and Awareness Center’s Peer
Education
program
had
a

number of stations out on the
Diag
Wednesday
afternoon,

showcasing
different
aspects

of healthy relationships and
consent.

Nursing senior Lena Briggs,

peer education co-coordinator
at
SAPAC,
helped
organize

the event — consisting of the
education station, the policy and
activism table, the swag station
and the self-care table — and said
she hoped it brought visibility to
key issues SAPAC focuses on.

“We want to spread messages

of positivity around healthy
relationships and around consent
so that people can engage in these
behaviors with their partners
and their peers,” Briggs said.
“We also want to create a more
positive culture around campus
and
hopefully
prevent
any

violence as well.”

To achieve this goal, the

education station focused on
providing students with facts
and statistics on sexual assault
through an educational game.
LSA senior Andreea Taran, a
SAPAC volunteer, helped run the
station.

“We
are
going
through

some statements on healthy
relationships,
consent
and

sexual assault that are kind of
controversial, like false reporting
statistics,” Taran said.

The policy and activism station

featured pamphlets discussing
sexual
assault
prevention

policies and ways to contact local
representatives, the swag station
handed out SAPAC resources
and the self-care station aided
students facing exam stress.

“Healthy
relationships
are

centered around equality, respect

and love,” Briggs said. “People
should feel empowered enough
to say ‘no’ when they want to,
they should ask for consent in
any sexual activity and know that
consent is easy.”

The event partnered with

Raise the Bar, a program that
trains personnel at local bars
around campus in bystander
intervention in sexual assault.
Students were encouraged to
visit all four stations to be entered

into a raffle for prizes sponsored
by the bars participating in the
program.

“Consent is all about showing

respect for your partner and for
yourself, and we are all about
establishing that as a precursor
to help fight sexual assault on
campus,” Taran said.

University
of
Michigan

LSA
Student
Government

discussed and voted on two
resolutions Wednesday night
to allocate funding for a light
therapy room in the Shapiro
Undergraduate Library and to
suggest LSA change its current
exam policy from allowing
students to take a maximum of
three exams in one day to two
exams in a day.

Both
the
light
therapy

resolution
and
the
exam

policy
resolution
passed

unanimously, with 21 votes in
favor and no votes against or
abstentions.

The meeting also featured

resolutions on free speech in
LSA SG and the conditions of
the Mason Hall bathrooms —
both of which passed — and
calling for adequate lighting
on North Campus, which was
tabled until the first summer
session.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, April 13, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 66
©2017 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

LSA reps
pass exam
limitation
resolution

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Assembly also decides to
bring therapy lights to
UGLi for student wellness

MATT HARMON
Daily Staff Reporter

ARNOLD ZHOU/Daily

LSA sophomore Ellen Yang talks to LSA freshman Josh Qu about sexual assault violence and prevention techniques
on the Diag on Wednesday.

Annual SAPAC Diag day focuses on
traits of healthy relationships, consent

Members open four stations geared toward raising awareness about sexual assault

CORY ZAYANCE
Daily Staff Reporter

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

Panelists
representing

an
array
of
corporations

and
companies
admitted

sustainability may not seem
synonymous with corporate
America — but the tide, they
all emphasized, is turning.
John Viera, global director of
sustainability at Ford Motor
Co.,
Diane
Holdorf,
chief

sustainability officer and vice
president
of
environmental

stewardship, health and safety
of the Kellogg Co. and Andy
Buchsbaum,
vice
president

of conservative action at the
National Wildlife Federation,
discussed how companies and
nonprofit organizations can
drive sustainability in front of
an audience of about 60 people.

In the auto industry, Viera

said a key to a company culture
that focuses on sustainability
is making sure each sector of
the business — from finance
to engineering — has a goal of
being sustainable.

Prominent
leaders talk
sustainable
companies

CAMPUS LIFE

Business owners highlight
conservation, stewardship
in the corporate realm

CALEB CHADWELL

Daily Staff Reporter

Public Policy junior Nadine

Jawad, vice president of Central
Student
Government,
was

named a Truman Scholarship,
an award that celebrates a
commitment to public service.
She will be the 27th candidate
at the University of Michigan to
receive this prestigious award.

According
to
a
press

release, Jawad was one of 62
undergraduates to be awarded
a scholarship this year, out of
the 768 students who were
nominated. Candidates must be
nominated by their university
in their junior year, and then
recipients are chosen by a
selection panel based on a series
of personal essays, letters and
interviews.

Jawad
aims
to
use
the

scholarship to pursue a degree in
medicine and a Master of Public
Health, with an interest in
women’s health and a potential
focus
on
HPV,
gynecologic

cancers and diseases that arise

in situations of intimate partner
violence.

“Ultimately, I’d like to work

somewhere in the government
sector, the (Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention) or the
World Health Organization —
that way I can blend my interest
in public policy with my interest
in medicine and kind of do both,”
she said.

Marjorie
Horton,
the

assistant dean for undergraduate
education, wrote in an email
interview
she
met
Jawad

through Jawad’s participation in
CSG and was unsurprised by her
success with the award.

“I see that intensity, drive

and tireless work ethic in all
that Nadine takes on,” Horton
wrote. “She focuses on how
to have a very real, tangible
impact. With her leadership
and
organizational
savvy

and
personal
magnetism,

she
harnesses
the
talents

and passions of many other
students, builds connections in
communities and with campus
administrators, and achieves

Jawad wins
prestigious
government
scholarship

Debbie Dingell, faculty members
send seniors off in ‘Last Lecture’

JOHN YAEGER/Daily

Rep. Debbie Dingell (D–Mich) speaks at the third annual Last Lecture Series in Weill Hall on Wednesday.

ACADEMICS

New CSG vice president is one of 62
Truman recipients for public service

EMILY MIILLER
Daily Staff Reporter

Annual event aimed to encourage graduating students to take hold of opportunity, challenges

Wrapping
up
the
year
for

Public Policy seniors was U.S. Rep.
Debbie Dingell (D–Mich.) and
distinguished professors of the
University of Michigan to deliver
what is traditionally called the Last
Lecture.

The event, as part of the third

annual Public Policy Last Lecture
series, brought University seniors
to Weill Hall on Wednesday to leave
them with lasting words as they face

graduation at the end of the month.

Public Policy senior Keerthana

Sundar helped organize the event,
and noted its importance in sending
off the seniors.

“The Last Lecture is a capstone

event that ties together a variety
of policy topics and perspectives
to end the school year,” Sundar
said. “It’s a send-off lecture full of
insightful advice and anecdotes
from our favorite professors.”

This year’s talk, called “Bursting

the Bubble: Policy in the Age of
Polarization,” aimed to discuss
politics after the 2016 presidential

election, as well as the importance
of breaking down party barriers.
Public Policy senior Connor Rubin,
another co-organizer of the event,
believed this year’s theme was
particularly important given the
events of the past year.

“This election was one of the most

polarizing in recent history, and I
think anyone interested in making
a difference in their community
needs to realize that yelling is easy,
but doesn’t solve anything,” said
Rubin. “The goal of this (lecture) is
to show a variety of perspectives,
because no singular point of view

has a monopoly on good ideas.”

Students listened to Dingell and

Public Policy professors give advice
on their upcoming endeavors, as
well as interpretations of today’s
political climate.

“You are graduating in very

unique and challenging times,”
Dingell said. “You are in a rapidly
changing
political,
social
and

economic landscape, and will need
to use what you have learned here
at the University of Michigan to
address the opportunities and the
challenges that lay ahead.”

MCKENZIE HANIGAN

For the Daily

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

Read more at
MichiganDaily.com

See LECTURE, Page 2
See TRUMAN, Page 2

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan