100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 14, 2017 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The
Senate
Advisory

Committee on University Affairs
met with University of Michigan
President Mark Schlissel and
the Provost and Executive Vice
President for Academic Affairs
Search
Advisory
Committee

Monday afternoon to discuss the
selection of the new provost.

Schlissel began the meeting

by seeking input from SACUA on
what the search committee should
look for in a new provost. Schlissel
welcomed SACUA’s advice not
only on what qualifications the
candidates should have, but also
the issues to which they should be
paying extra attention, particularly
as a body that frequently interacts
with the provost.

“I thought it would be valuable

to have input from SACUA about
what we should be paying closest
attention to as we search for a
new
provost,”
Schlissel
said.

“You’re amongst the group that
interacts with the provost quite a
bit … so your advice is particularly
welcome.”

SACUA member John Lehman,

a professor of biology, began the
conversation by reading a list of
questions he and the Academic
Affairs
Advisory
Committee

created. The committee hopes
the questions will be used in the
interviews of the candidates for
provost. Its questions covered a
broad range of topics, including
what the candidate believes to be
the purpose of the University and

his or her vision for research and
innovation at the University.

Lehman also stressed the

importance of the future provost’s
engagement with undergraduate
education,
considering
the

provost is currently the only
individual with a responsibility
for
undergraduate
education

on campus. Lehman suggested
asking whether the provost would
like to expand that responsibility
and if he or she would consider

active
involvement
with

students by teaching occasional
undergraduate courses.

Schlissel
responded

enthusiastically to the AAAC’s list,
saying the search committee has
already spent time thinking about
the provost’s relationship with
undergraduate education.

“We were just talking about the

issue of undergraduate education
today,” Schlissel said. “All schools
and colleges have structures that

look after their undergraduate
programs and deans respond
on the school level. But the
provost is really the integrator
of undergraduate commitments
across the campus.”

Other
SACUA
members

posed
their
own
questions

regarding topics such as how
the next provost will further the
University’s Diversity, Equity and
Inclusion plan and interact with

With
the
current

administration nearing its end, the
first campaign for the University
of Michigan’s Central Student
Government launched Monday
night. The group celebrated its
new beginning in the Ross School
of Business with its 15 member
team.

The party, eMerge, is headed

by LSA junior Anushka Sarkar,
the former Chief Programming
Officer,
who
is
running
for

President,
and
Public
Policy

junior Nadine Jawad, the current
CSG Senior Policy Advisor, who
is running for Vice President.
Currently, the party is unopposed.

Last
year,
Sarkar
worked

with the Mental Health Leaders
Network, where she helped push to
increase the number of counselors
in Counseling and Psychological
Services. The party’s goals are
based in pushing for sustainable
changes that can impact a greater
movement.

“We
really
pushed
the

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, February 14, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 29
©2016 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

See CAMPAIGN, Page 3

New party
announces
run in CSG
elections

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

LSA juniors lead eMerge
campaign, aim to bring
attention to student voices

NISA KHAN &

JORDYN BAKER
Daily News Editor &
Daily Staff Reporter

MATT VAILLIENCOURT/Daily

University President Mark Schlissel joined the SACUA meeting to discuss the search for a new provost at the Fleming
Building on Monday.

Adminstration and SACUA discuss
selection of next University provost

President Mark Schlissel visits the committee, asking for suggestions, recommendations

MAYA GOLDMAN

Daily Staff Reporter

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See SACUA, Page 3

Updates regarding three hate

crimes that occurred at the end of
last year have been released by the
Ann Arbor Police Department.
Following the conclusion of a
joint investigation with the FBI,
AAPD and the Division of Public
Safety and Security, two of the
three crimes were deemed as
being falsely reported and the
other investigation is currently
inactive because of lack of
information.

The
first
incident,
which

took place on Nov. 11, involved
a student who reported being
approached by a man who
demanded she remove her hijab
or he would set her on fire. It
was later determined, citing
several discrepancies between
eyewitness
testimonies
and

surveillance
tapes
from
the

scene, the alleged crime did
not occur. According to a press
release from the AAPD, the
student will not be prosecuted
for the false report.

“Washtenaw
County

Prosecutor’s office declined to
authorize criminal charges,” Lt.

See DPSS, Page 3

DPSS gives
update on
alleged Fall
hate crimes

CRIME

‘U’ police, AAPD and FBI
determine two of three
hate crimes did not occur

ALEXIS RANKIN
Daily Staff Reporter

The Provost and Executive

Vice President for Academic
Affairs
Search
Advisory

Committee held a town hall
meeting Monday evening, seeking
public input on the search process
for the position, which oversees
academic and budgetary affairs
for the University of Michigan.

The position of interim provost

is currently held by Public Policy
Prof. Paul Courant, who assumed
the position on Feb. 1st after
former Provost Martha Pollack
left the University on Jan. 31 to
serve role as president of Cornell
University starting April 17.

University
President
Mark

Schlissel,
who
chairs
the

committee, said he hopes to fill
the position by the beginning of
the next academic year.

Aside
from
Schlissel,
the

committee
consists
of
10

professors and deans from several
of the University’s 19 schools, as
well as one student representative.

The
town
hall
had
an

attendance of about 30 people,
most of whom were faculty and
staff, as well as the committee
members themselves. The group
articulated ideas about what
qualities the next provost should
have and the issues with which he
or she should be most concerned.

Several attendees mentioned

the importance of the provost’s
understanding
of
research,

including
Vice
President
for

Research Jack Hu, a committee
member
and
professor
of

mechanical
engineering,
who

said it was important to him that
the future provost was someone
who had done research and
understood the complexities of
the research enterprise.

LSA senior Aditi Rao raised

the question of innovations in
education, citing Caitlin Holman’s
recent TedxUofM presentation
about improvements that could be
made in education.

“I know a few of you have

mentioned the importance of
research and that the provost
has participated in research,”
Rao said. “I think it would be

Public input,
feedback on
provost heard
at town hall

Students, professors explore role of
free speech in classroom, on campus

See TOWN HALL, Page 3

DESIGN BY: MICHELLE PHILLIPS

ADMINISTRATION

Students interested in selection of leader,
faculty also vocalize specific requests

ALON SAMUEL
Daily Staff Reporter

University as a public institution has strict policies regarding First Amendment

In the last year there have been

several instances of hate speech
and
targeted
verbal
attacks

against different minority groups
on the University of Michigan
campus.
However,
the
line

between hate speech and free
speech remains blurred for the
University to interpret in each
individual case, as the balance
between maintaining free speech
and a safe environment for

students continually remains a
precarious one.

As a public institution, the

University must strictly adhere
to the First Amendment and the
freedom of speech it guarantees.
The
University
codified
its

commitment
to
free
speech

and a safe campus in its UM
Standard Practice Guide, as of
the many policies in the SPG, one
is dedicated solely to 601.01, the
“Freedom of Speech and Artistic
Expression.”

The Civil Liberties Board of

the University’s Senate Assembly

proposed a set of guidelines to be
adopted by the University.

Prefacing the policies is the

goal that, by representing and
allowing for the entire spectrum
of opinions within the University
community, the staff can create
an
open
forum
for
diverse

opinions. The guidelines of 601.01
are committed to the exchange of
opinions to encourage learning.

“Expression of diverse points of

view is of the highest importance,
not only for those who espouse a
cause or position and then defend
it, but also for those who hear and

pass judgment on that defense,”
the policy reads. “The belief that
an opinion is pernicious, false, or
in any other way detestable cannot
be grounds for its suppression.”

Law student Erin Pamukcu,

president
of
the
University’s

chapter
of
the
American

Constitution
Society,
believes

the First Amendment and free
speech are foundations not only
in the study of law, but the U.S.
democratic system.

“It’s
the
Amendment
that

ensures the will of the people can

CAITLIN REEDY
Daily Staff Reporter

See FREE SPEECH, Page 3

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan