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February 13, 2017 - Image 1

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The LSA Bicentennial Theme

Semester
hosted
its
second

symposium Friday in East Quad
entitled “1877: Reconstructing
the University of Michigan.” The
event was a panel discussion
Reconstruction in the aftermath
of the Civil War in Michigan,
including how the University’s
modern image was shaped by the
admittance of female students.

Michelle McClellan, associate

history and Residential College
professor
explained
how

Reconstruction was a time of
disarray, in which the country
was trying to experiment with
ways to reunite the country.

“Reconstruction is really the

era where we would start to
recognize the world as we know
it,” McClellan said. “This last
quarter of the 19th century is
where, if we could time travel,
we would start to recognize the
outlines then of what we know
now.”

According
to
Martin

Hershock, professor of history
at
UM-Dearborn,
Michigan

was considered a standard of
progression in the country with
the creation of the Republican
Party.

“Michigan
replicated
that

intense
religious
fervor
and

evangelical
commitment
to

change,” he said. “Many referred
to Michigan in very idealistic

Early
Saturday
morning

approximately
30
abortion

opponents
from
throughout

Michigan were met with an
overwhelming number of about
400 abortion rights advocates,
mostly from Ann Arbor, chanting,
“My body, my choice” along the
sidewalks in front of west Ann
Arbor’s Planned Parenthood.

Planned
Parenthood
is
a

nonprofit organization that offers
reproductive health care services
as well as testing for STIs, breast
cancer screenings and services for
the LGBTQ community.

The abortion opponent rally

was initiated by the national
organization
Protest
Planned

Parenthood,
which
aims
to

defund Planned Parenthood and
tax-funded abortions. Planned
Parenthood
provides
health

care for women and only three
percent of their budget goes
towards abortions. The event was
scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. which
concluded at about 10:30 a.m.

A
counter-rally
was

organized in response by the
local organization Stop Trump
Ann Arbor, which seeks to
defend the abortion services of
Planned Parenthood. Its event
to defend Planned Parenthood
was scheduled to organize an
hour earlier starting at 8 a.m. and
lasting until about 10:30 a.m.

Jessica Prozinski, a founder

of Stop Trump Ann Arbor,
organized and led the abortion

rights counter-rally over the
course of three weeks. In a
rebuttal to defend the services of
Planned Parenthood, Prozinski
said
her
motivations
for

organizing the counter-rally were
the importance and immediate
concern for the safety and health
of women who have abortions.

“We will not go back to the

days of back-alley abortions and
coat-hanger atrocities,” Prozinski
said. “There is no way we’re going

back and we’re building a new
integrative women’s movement
to fight for women’s rights and for
the rights of all people.”

Prozinski also shared how

the counter-rally is just one-step
forward in the movement for
women’s health and how people’s
perspectives across the country
are changing.

“We are going to keep fighting

from keeping the forces of reaction
from claiming our country,”

Prozinski said. “We’re going to
build a new social movement to
make our country finally equal
and democratic.”

Ypsilanti resident Mariel de

Soleil, a member of the local
organization Citizens for Pro-Life
Society, got the idea of organizing
a local rally from the national
movement and sought support
through the effort through emails
to friends and colleagues. De Soleil

When
Anna
Forringer-Beal,

a 2016 University of Michigan
graduate of LSA, found out she
had won a Gates Cambridge
Scholarship to study at Cambridge
University next year, she had to
take a minute to digest the news.

“I was working when I found

out, and I was on break, and I
just left and walked around the
block a couple times,” she said.
“I was so excited — just so much
energy — but I also really see it as
a responsibility. It certainly feels
like I’m responsible to share what
I learn with others … so it can go
beyond me and just my one year at
Cambridge.”

Forringer-Beal is one of just

36 American scholars to earn the
scholarship this year. She and the
rest of the American cohort will
be joined by 54 other international
scholars whose names have not yet
been announced. Established in
2000 by an endowment from Bill
and Melinda Gates, the scholarship
will enable her to spend a year at
Cambridge University in England
and earn a Master’s degree in
multi-disciplinary gender studies.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, February 13, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 28
©2016 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

SPORTS.............B INSERT

Bicentennial
panel covers
‘U’ history of
race, gender

Recent incidents expose divide
between DEI plan and students

See BICENTENNIAL, Page 3A

ILLUSTRATION BY CARLY BERGER

CAMPUS LIFE

Second LSA symposium examines
Reconstruction, female admission

RASHEED ABDULLAH

Daily Staff Reporter

Activists criticize institutional responses, officials express long-term optimism

In response to recent hate acts

and a changing political climate,
students are questioning the nature
and progress of the University
of Michigan’s five-year plan for
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.

Program leaders are replying by
emphasizing long-term goals and
voicing optimism for short-term
strategies.

Announced in February 2015,

the DEI plan officially launched in
October 2016 as a program aimed at
fostering an inclusive and equitable
campus climate. The five-year
operation will cost $85 million, in

addition to its annual investment
of $40 million. The University-
wide plan consists of 49 sub-plans,
each organized by a University unit
of administration, academics or
athletics.

Among
the
plan’s
various

initiatives are Wolverine Pathways
and the HAIL Program, which
aim to increase minority student

enrollment
and
socioeconomic

diversity, as well as a diversity-
related
training
program
for

faculty and staff. It also includes a
strategy to offer financial support to
departments that conduct diversity-
related
research.
Construction

of the new Trotter Multicultural
Center closer to central campus is

JENNIFER MEER
Daily Staff Reporter

See SCHOLARSHIP, Page 3A

Alum wins
prestigious
Cambridge
scholarship


ACADEMICS

Scholar Anna Forringer-
Beal to pursue Master’s
degree in gender studies

MAYA GOLDMAN

Daily Staff Reporter

CAROLYN GEARIG/Daily

Jessica Prozinski, the founder of Stop Trump Ann Arbor, speaks to dozens of pro-choice and pro-life activists in front
of Planned Parenthood on Saturday morning.

Over 400 pro-choice activists counter
rally to “Defund Planned Parenthood”

Opposing viewpoints expressed at local, nationwide Planned Parenthood demonstrations

DYLAN LACROIX

For the Daily

In full bloom

The Michigan men’s

basketball team traveled to

Bloomington and notched its
first road win of the season,
leaving Assembly Hall with

a victory for the first time

since 2009. » Page 1B

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See PROTEST, Page 3A

See DEI, Page 3A

Susan Taylor, former editor-

in-chief of Essence magazine and
founder and CEO of the National
CARES
Mentoring
Movement

— a movement aiming to reduce
the cycle of intergenerational
poverty among African Americans
— delivered a keynote speech
about finding one’s purpose to
approximately 100 people in the
Ross School of Business Robertson
Auditorium Friday night. The
speech was a part of the kick-off
even of the 41st annual Alfred
L. Edwards conference, hosted
and organized by the Ross Black
Business Students Association.

The
Ross
Black
Business

Students Association, one of the
largest professional student-led
organizations in the Business
School,
is
devoted
to
the

recruitment of undergraduate and
graduate Black business students
and the professional and academic
development of its members. The
association does this through
program
initiatives
focused

on professional and academic
development events throughout
the academic year.

See EIC, Page 3A

Importance
of purpose
stressed at
conference

BUSINESS

Susan Taylor, CEO of
CARES Mentoring
Movement, speaks to 100

DYLAN LACROIX

For the Daily

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