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October 20, 2016 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Wednesday
afternoon,

more than 40 people — the
majority from the University
of
Michigan
Romance

Language
and
Literature

Department — participated in
a demonstration on the Diag as
a part of the “Ni Una Menos”
movement, with the aim of
exposing
violence
toward

women in Latin America and
the United States.

The event was one of many

of its kind that took place
Wednesday across the United
States
to

commemorate

the killing of Lucia Perez, a
young Argentenian woman.

Perez was brutally raped and
killed last week in La Plata,
the
capital
of
Argentina’s

Buenos
Aires
province,

immediately
resulting
in

several demonstrations across
the country.

“The
(#NiUnaMenos)

movement
was
originally

to
protest
against
gender

violence, and especially all
the women who are killed in
Mexico Argentina, Guatemala
and Colombia, but it’s turned
into something greater,” said
Rackham
student
Ludmila

Ferrari

The phrase “Ni Una Menos”

was coined in 1993 in a poem
written by Susana Chavez. In
the poem, Chavez references

In Ron Weiser’s third bid

for a seat on the University of
Michigan’s Board of Regents,
the
former
ambassador
and

University philanthropist wants
voters to know he means business
— literally.

Weiser
founded
prominent

real
estate
firm
McKinley

Associates Inc. nearly 50 years
ago, and served as ambassador to
Slovakia under former President
George Bush from 2001 to 2005.
He also chaired the Michigan
Republican Party from 2009 to
2011. Currently, he has a role in
Republican presidential nominee
Donald Trump’s campaign by
fundraising as part of the Trump
Victory Committee.

He previously ran for regent

unsuccessfully in 2014. In 2012,
Weiser began a campaign for the
role but dropped out to focus on
his position as finance chairman
for
the
Republican
National

Committee.

In his 2014 campaign, Weiser

focused on issues of student
affordability but ultimately lost
the race to current regent Mike
Behm (D) by a margin of 4,835
votes. This time around, he said
he hopes to capture the seat by
honing in on rising tuition rates
and a growing budget.

“We need to keep the University

as affordable as possible,” he said.
“It’s not fair to burden kids.”

Weiser pointed to his diverse

background in both bureaucracy

and business as reasons he’s well
suited for the job.

“There’s no businesspeople,

especially ones that have been
involved in bureaucracy,” he said
of the University’s current Board
of Regents. “I learned a lot in the
State Department about getting
things done.”

One current regent, Denise

Ilitch (D–Bingham Farms), does
have notable business experience
— she is president of Ilitch

Enterprises, owner of Denise
Ilitch Designs and the owner
and publisher of Ambassador
Magazine.
Ilitch
and
fellow

sitting regent Laurence Deitch
(D–Bloomfield Hills) are running
incumbent campaigns to regain
their seats come the general
election Nov. 8. Carl Meyers,
Republican and former treasurer
of the Michigan GOP, is also
competing for a seat on the board.

Weiser’s
campaign
website

touts his ability to “run the U of M
like a business.” In an interview,
however, he softened that claim
slightly.

“I would run the University

not like a business, it’s more like
an NGO,” he said, referring to
non-governmental organizations.
“Students
are
customers...
I

always take time to meet with
students.”

To combat the increase in

The city of Ann Arbor has

begun planning for this year’s
wintertime deer cull, the second
iteration of the city’s four-
year plan to manage its deer
population.

The
Michigan
Department

of Natural Resources gave Ann
Arbor permission to kill up to 100
deer within city boundaries last
December. The first part of the
cull took place earlier this year
between January and March,
killing 63 deer.

Ann
Arbor
released
its

2017 deer management plan,
which calls for the use of both
a lethal cull and non-lethal
sterilization methods to control
the deer population, Friday. The
management plan also proposes
developing
an
educational

program for residents to protect
their property, such as by fencing
or
refraining
from
keeping

certain plants.

The cull was highly unpopular

among many citizens and some
members of City Council — when
the it was first introduced —
citizens expressed concern over

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, October 20, 2016

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVI, No. 14
©2016 The Michigan Daily

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

CL A SSIFIEDS .............. 5A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A

B S I D E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B

See DIAG, Page 3A

GRANT HARDY/Daily

Randy Clark, candidate for the Michigan State House of Representatives, addresses
the audience at the College Republican’s presidential debate watch party in Angell Hall
Wednesday.

At watch parties for the final

presidential debate Wednesday
night, hosted by the University
of Michigan’s chapters of College
Democrats
and
Students
for

Hillary as well as the College
Republicans, students divided
along party lines with two
distinct interpretations of who
won the debate and how each
candidate performed.

During the debate, Democratic

nominee Hillary Clinton and
Republican
nominee
Donald

Trump discussed a range of

issues, from debt and entitlement
reform, immigration, economy,
the Supreme Court, foreign hot
spots and fitness to be president.

One of the more significant

moments of the debate came
about halfway through, when
Trump was asked if he would
concede the election if he were
to lose. Over the past month,

the candidate has been raising
concerns that the election will
be rigged against him — claims
that have been met with a critical
response.

In
response,
Trump
said,

“I’ll tell you at the time,” an
unprecedented
answer
for
a

candidate in recent history.

See CULL, Page 3A

FILE PHOTO/Daily

Ron Weiser in his office on Main Street on October 24, 2014.

B-Side

The B-Side explores the

nature of fear in Ann Arbor,
with one writer embarking
on a hunt for killer clowns

downtown.
» Page 1B

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See WEISER, Page 3A

See DEBATE, Page 3A

The Ford School of Public

Policy
hosted
a
policy
talk

Wednesday afternoon featuring
Justin Lin, former World Bank
Chief Economist, on the future of
economic relations between the
U.S. and China.

Moderated by Associate prof

of Public Policy John Ciorciari,
the director of the International
Policy Center, the talk began with
Lin offering a general overview
of the recent developments in the
Chinese economy. Though the
Chinese government announced
Wednesday that growth in GDP
for the last economic quarter was
6.7 percent, Lin acknowledged
that recently, growth has been a
disappointment and compared to
past years, this rate is low.

However, Lin said China is a

transitional economy moving into
an era in which domestic consumer
spending
will
drive
growth.

He added that other emerging
economies, like those in Brazil and
Russia, have also seen their growth
rates decline in recent years.

Comparing China to India,

which is also going through a

See BANK, Page 3A

CLAIRE MEINGAST/Daily

Public Policy freshman Anna Lenhart watches the third presidential debate with
the College Democrats at the School of Public Policy Wednesday.

Students call
for justice in
death of teen
in Argentina

Campus organizations host watch
parties for last presidential debate

CAMPUS LIFE

Ni Una Menos movement holds protests
for women’s rights nationwide

ETHAN LEVIN
Daily Staff Reporter

Students cite questions on entitlements, Supreme Court as most important

EMILY MIILLER &
NEIL SCHWARTZ
Daily Staff Reporters

Deer cull
to restart in
Ann Arbor
this winter

LOCAL

City officials release
updated management
plan for 2017 efforts

SOPHIE SHERRY
Daily Staff Reporter

Ron Weiser stresses affordability for
students in bid for Board of Regents

Former ambassador emphasizes budget control, halting rising tuition

RIYAH BASHA
Daily Staff Reporter

Economist
talks GDP
of China,
U.S. at ‘U’

CAMPUS LIFE

Former World Bank
employee urges joint work
between countries

TYLER COADY
Daily Staff Reporter

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