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October 03, 2016 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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During
a
community

conversation on race and campus
climate
Sunday,
University

of Michigan President Mark
Schlissel listened to student
concerns and emphasized the
impact he hopes the upcoming
release of a University-wide
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
plan will have on campus.

The conversation, announced

on Wednesday, was planned
in response to racially charged
fliers that were hung in Mason
and Haven Halls last week.
The fliers, along with a planned
debate over the merits of the
Black Lives Matter movement,

prompted large student protests
throughout the week.

Both
events
occurred
a

week before the release of the
University’s
Diversity,
Equity

and Inclusion strategic plan, a
year-long
initiative
launched

by Schlissel last September and
slated to be announced Thursday.

Schlissel told the crowd that

he believes the success of his
presidency rests on the execution
of the plan, and his ability to
improve climate on campus.

He also stressed the need to

get students involved in resolving
campus climate issues, noting
low attendance at events.

Four forums held by LSA

over the past few weeks about
their portion of the strategic

Cecilia Muñoz, director of the

White House Domestic Policy
Council, and a panel of experts
from Rust Belt cities in the U.S.
drew more than 100 attendees to
explore the crucial relationships
between municipal, state and
national governments for the
implementation of the Obama
administration’s
“place-based”

approach to domestic policy.

Muñoz,
a
University
of

Michigan alum, was also the
Towsley Foundation Policymaker

in Residence at the Public Policy
School in 2007.

The panel was comprised of five

public servants from the Rust Belt
cities of Youngstown, Ohio; Gary,
Ind.; and Detroit, each highlighting
the
role
of
cooperation
on

municipal, state and national levels
in the “place-based”approach the
Obama administration has taken
to domestic policy. Rust Belt cities
refer to Midwestern and northern
American
cities
characterized

by declining industry and falling
populations.

Colonel
Kevin
Riley,
the

commander’s
special
assistant

for community partnerships in

Youngstown and former United
States Air Force Commander,
and
Abigail
Beniston,
code

enforcement
and
blight

remediation superintendent for
the city of Youngstown, described
the
city’s
unique
cooperative

relationship
in
tackling
the

problem of abandoned or vacant
housing. Looking for ways to cut
down on training costs for the
Youngstown Air Reserve Station,
Riley made use of the Realistic
Military Training Program to kill
two birds with one stone.

“I have civil engineers who need

training on heavy machinery; they

During the lead up to the

presidential
election,
The

Michigan
Daily
is
polling

students about campaign issues
every two weeks. This is the
second iteration of the survey.

This week, the survey was

sent to 1,000 University of
Michigan students and received
231 responses over a period of
five days. The sample was chosen
randomly
from
University

undergraduates and reported in
the aggregate.

The respondents of the

survey
overwhelmingly

identified as Democrats at 51
percent. 17 percent identified
with the Republican Party.

The rest of the respondents
identified
as
Independent,

Libertarian or did not identify
with a party.

The
responses
follow

national trends of millennials
tending to vote Democratic.
Pew Research center found
that, nationally, 51 percent of
millennials identify as or lean
Democratic, compared to 35
percent who identify with
the Republican Party. This
trend also spans the past few
decades, with more and more
college graduates identifying as
Democrats.

Responses
to
the
Daily

polling reached 89 percent
when asked if they would vote
in the upcoming election with
the majority responding with

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, October 3, 2016

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVI, No. 2
©2016 The Michigan Daily

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

CL ASSIFIEDS............... 5A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A

S P O RT S M O N DAY. . . . . . . .1 B

See SCHLISSEL, Page 3A

AMELIA CACCHIONE/Daily

Gov. Rick Snyder (R) speaks at the Let’s End Campus Sexual Assault Summit at the North Campus Research Complex Friday.

Michigan
first
lady
Sue

Snyder hosted the second annual
“Inform. Empower. Prevent. Let’s
End Campus Sexual Assault”
summit Friday at the University of

Michigan where representatives
from Greek life, athletics and
state
government
discussed

rising sexual assault numbers and
strategies for eliminating sexual
assault on college campuses.

The summit featured a variety

of speakers and panels, including
an athletic panel as well as panels
on bystander intervention and

rape culture.

Gov. Rick Snyder, first lady Sue

Snyder and their daughter, LSA
junior Kelsey Snyder, kicked off
the event with remarks on the
importance of creating a dialogue
on sexual assault and working
to end sexual assault on college
campuses.

In his remarks, Gov. Snyder said

sexual assault has historically been
one of the most underrepresented
issues in society, and legislatures
and colleges need to be doing more
to combat it. He said summits
like this one are a powerful step
forward, but also encouraged
people to go out and take action to
individually facilitate change.

See SURVEY, Page 3A

AMANDA ALLEN/Daily

Cecilia Muñoz, director of the White House Domestic Policy Council, leads a panel of federal and local officials in a
discussion on work being done in rustbelt cities in Annenburg Auditorium Friday.

The Speight escape

Wilton Speight’s late

touchdown to Amara Darboh

helped No. 4 Michigan

survive a physical battle
against No. 8 Wisconsin.

» Page 2B

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See PANEL, Page 3A

See SUMMIT, Page 2A

The first top-10 matchup in Ann

Arbor since 2003 was expected
to be a defensive showdown, and
with the sun setting over Michigan
Stadium in the fourth quarter, it
looked like a showdown in which
the
fourth-ranked
Wolverines

might come up short.

Despite
outgaining
No.
8

Wisconsin by nearly 200 yards,
Michigan had struggled to get
anything going after scoring a
touchdown on the first play of the
second quarter. The Badgers had
stopped every drive, sacked and
picked off redshirt sophomore
quarterback Wilton Speight and
capitalized on three missed field
goals to put the Wolverines’ backs
against the wall.

But Speight reached back for one

big play — a 46-yard touchdown
pass to fifth-year senior wide
receiver Amara Darboh with 7:56
to play — and it put Michigan back
on top, 14-7. And as it has all season,
the Wolverines’ defense took care
of the rest.

Michigan stopped Wisconsin

three times in the final quarter

capped
by
a
one-handed

See FOOTBALL, Page 3A

70.13%
Hillary Clinton

12.12%

Donald Trump

Projected Student Candidate Choice

Source: Michigan Daily student survey

11.69%

Gary Johnson

3.03%
Jill Stein

3.03%

Other

‘U’ president
holds forum
on racially
charged fliers

Sue Snyder hosts annual summit
on fighting campus sexual assault

ADMINISTRATION

Schlissel focuses on DEI plan in
responding to student concerns

KATHERINE CURRAN

Daily Staff Reporter

Greek life members, athletic deparment participate in panels

LYDIA MURRAY & CALEB

CHADWELL

Daily Staff Reporters

Support for Trump
grows in Daily poll

70 percent of students say they would vote
for Hillary Clinton

CAITLIN REEDY
Daily Staff Reporter

White House official discusses
place-based policy initiatives

City representatives discuss collaborative efforts in the Rust Belt

ANDREW HIYAMA

Daily Staff Reporter

Wolverines
score late,
overcome
Wisconsin

FOOTBALL

Behind last-minute
touchdown, Michigan
wins 14-7

JACOB GASE

Managing Sports Editor

GOVERNMENT

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