100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 16, 2016 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Joe Palca, an award-winning

science
correspondent
from

National Public Radio, visited
the University of Michigan
Thursday afternoon to give a
talk
titled
“Communicating

Science for Fun and Profit” at
West Hall. The talk focused
on how to better communicate
science with the general public.

Palca, who has worked for

NPR since 1992, has covered
a large range of science news,
such
as
the
new
genome

editing technology and the first
snapshots of Jupiter’s north
pole. He used his previously
written stories as examples to
illustrate several points, like
the low scientific literacy of the
U.S. population. According to a
survey in 2013, just 58 percent
of 18- to 29-year-olds answered
correctly that carbon dioxide is
the gas associated with climate
change.

Palca said he constantly asks

himself what he can expect his
audience to know. Using his
recent article on Jupiter’s north
pole as an example, he explained
how scientific research always
has jargon, like “aurora” —
lights caused by the interaction
between particles from the sun
and the Earth’s magnetic field.
Palca said, as a writer, he needs
to first understand the jargon
to translate it into simpler
language.

“There is always a certain

amount of jargon,” he said.

“Now, aurora — people don’t
really, really know what aurora
was. I had to go and look it up
and remind myself what an
aurora was. And I certainly
didn’t explain why there are
poles (on Jupiter) and why
magnetic fields come together at
poles. … I tried to, in the piece,
keep the simplest words I can.”

He also spoke of his efforts

to portray scientists as people,
not as “body of brains” [COPY: a

body of brains? Bodies of brains?
Plural bc we’re talking about
scientists] without passion or
interest who sleep in the lab or at
their computer. To illustrate the
human side of scientists, Palca
pointed to comments made by
several competing scientists he
interviewed who said though
they would be happy for anyone
to discover the ninth planet,
they would be happier if they
were the ones who find it first.

“Scientists have said, ‘look

it’s not about me, it’s about my
science,’ ” Palca said. “You can
say that to other scientists when
you’re talking to them, but when
you’re on the radio and you’re
talking to me, it’s about you. I
think people respond to people.”

Finally, Palca said while

there are many new findings
in science covered by media,
they are not necessarily the

The Trotter Multicultural

Center kicked off the year
with its A Peace of Trotter
event, which offered a variety
of global activities Thursday
evening.

The
event
featured
an

assortment
of
international

cuisine, yoga on the lawn,
Congolese dancing and Paint
No Pour — a program based
off Painting with a Twist, a
painting studio that includes
in class instruction, without
alcohol
or
other
altering

substances.

The
activities
were
all

led by various members of
the University of Michigan
community,
including

professors, faculty and staff.

Program Manager Jessica

Thompson said she wanted
this event to demonstrate what
students can expect from the
Trotter Center for the rest
of the year. Looking ahead,
Thompson said Trotter will
continue to host its regular
events — like Paint No Pour,
Soul Food Sundays and Congo
dancing lessons — in addition

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, September 16, 2016

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXV, No. 135
©2016 The Michigan Daily

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

C L A S S I F I E D S . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A

FOOTBALL SATURDAY..1B

The City of Ann Arbor is

working to develop a new long-
term plan recycling in the city
after being sued by the city’s
former
recycling
operator,

ReCommunity.

Currently, recycling in the

city is being managed by a
short-term
operator
put
in

place to temporarily continue
recycling services while an
interim company is found.

On
July
27,
Resource

Recovery Systems LLC and
FCR LLC, better known as
ReCommunity, filed a federal
lawsuit against the city of Ann

Arbor
alleging
a
wrongful

termination of its contract.
ReCommunity says the city
violated terms of its contract
by failing to pay the costs of
revenue shortfalls and repairs,
and used wrongful means to end
the contract when it saw it as no
longer financially beneficial.

The city of Ann Arbor

alleges
the
contract
was

terminated
due
to
safety

concerns and a multitude of
fires at ReCommunity plants.
ReCommunity
managed

the city’s Material Recovery
Facility on Platt Road, as well as
the city’s recycling facility and
transfer station.

See RECYCLE, Page 3A

ELIZABETH XIONG/Daily

University President Mark Schlissel listens to speakers at the regents meeting at the Michigan Union Thursday.

The University of Michigan

Board of Regents held its first
meeting of the academic year
Thursday afternoon, passing
measures including a pay raise

for University President Mark
Schlissel, new renovations and
new bylaws concerning student
input on the board’s decisions,
along with the announcement
of a new robotics laboratory.

New renovations to Dental

Building, Kraus Building and
LSA Building

The board approved a $122

million renovation project to
the W.K. Kellogg Institute and
Dental building. The repairs
will cover 172,000 square feet
of the current buildings and
add 37,000 square feet to the
complex, addressing concerns
such as patient accessibility

and
deferred
maintenance.

Upon approval by the state
legislature, $30 million will
come from the state, while the
Office of the Provost will front
the remaining cost. The board
also authorized architecture
firm SmithGroupJJR to oversee

See TROTTER, Page 3A

AMELIA CACCHIONE/Daily

NPR science reporter, Joe Palca gives a talk about communicating science at West Hall on Thursday.

Miracle at Michigan
On Sept. 24, 1994, Colorado

stunned Michigan in a
shocking ending. As the
Buffaloes return to Ann

Arbor, those involved look
back at that bizarre finish.

» Page 4B

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

The University of Michigan’s

Monitoring the Future survey
announced last week that they
found college-aged adults’ use
of marijuana has continued to
steadily increase since 1975,
while the rate of “being drunk”
has held at near 60 percent
prevalence level since 2000.

Lloyd Johnston, the study’s

principal investigator and a
senior research scientist at the
Institute for Social Research,
said
alcohol,
marijana,

narcotics and cigarettes are
among the most frequently
used substances on campus.

Alcohol
Johnston said one of the

more significant and relevant
facets of the study is its focus
on alcohol use among college
students, a demographic which
often drinks in excess in short
periods of time.

Johnston said the numbers

on alcohol use are concerning,
“particularly for people who
are binge drinking and doing
what we’ve called extreme
binge drinking, which is very
dangerous — having 10 or 15

See MARIJUANA, Page 3A

See NPR, Page 3A

See REGENTS, Page 3A

A2 works to
develop plan
for recycling
operations

Regents reinstate bylaw section,
vote to award Schlissel pay raise

LOCAL

Following ReCommunity lawsuit,
city focuses on long-term changes

SOPHIE SHERRY
Daily Staff Reporter

At first fall meeting, body considers additions to increase student input

RIYAH BASHA &

KATHERINE CURRAN

Daily Staff Reporters

Peace of
Trotter
kicks off
semester

CAMPUS LIFE

Students, faculty and
staff gathered for food
and activities Thursday

LYDIA MURRAY
Daily Staff Reporter

NPR correspondent gives lecture on
challenges in scientific journalism

Joe Palca discusses communicating technical concepts effectively

IRENE PARK

Daily Staff Reporter

Study finds


youth more
likely to use
marijuana

RESEARCH

University survey shows
trends in college drug
and alcohol use

ALEXA ST. JOHN
Daily Staff Reporter

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan