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Classifieds

Call: #734-418-4115
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ACROSS
1 Library recess
7 Brief amt. of time
11 Karaoke need,
briefly
14 Slanted
15 With 34-Across,
concert band
instrument
16 Big fuss
17 Parody involving
molten rock?
19 Sneaky job
20 APA member?:
Abbr.
21 Med. test
22 Eight-time co-star
of Joan Crawford
24 Teeth: Pref.
27 Note
28 Wind god’s
whaling weapon?
33 Crybaby
34 See 15-Across
35 Arctic flier
36 Stalling-for-time
syllables
37 Honor earned by
27 Super Bowl
QBs
39 Light lead-in
41 Scoreboard fig.
42 Director
Preminger
44 It borders It.
46 Sparkling wit
48 Blubbering
Belgian?
51 8th-century
Japanese capital
52 Runs while
standing
53 Try a new color on
55 June portrayer in
“Henry & June”
56 Repeat, but more
softly each time
60 First name in
shipping
61 Hollywood
harlequin?
65 Java
66 Eclectic quarterly
digest
67 Hard to read,
maybe
68 Animal in some
fables
69 He says to
Cordelia, “Thy
truth, then, be thy
dower”
70 Cerebral __

DOWN
1 __ breve
2 Pastures
3 Home team at
Cleveland’s “The
Q”
4 Uninterrupted
5 Mph
6 Former PBS host
LeShan
7 Place setting
items
8 Tough march
9 1940s stage for
Ike
10 __ eel
11 Apple with a
Force Touch
trackpad
12 Fan club focus
13 Lane-closing
sight
18 Physical
leader?
23 Gear on stage
25 Kind of tchr.
26 Buddhist state
27 Klinger’s first
name on
“M*A*S*H”
28 Vital supply line
29 Where to find
Java
30 Magic show prop
31 __ the cold

32 Democratic
donkey drawer
33 Litter cry
38 Wrinkly little dog
40 __ Royale,
Michigan
43 Skin care brand
45 Pool party?
47 Be the subject of,
as a painting
49 Furious
50 Not much at all
53 Indian noble

54 Love deity
55 Forearm bone
57 Egyptian
Christian
58 “The thing with
feathers / That
perches in the
soul”: Dickinson
59 Cameo stone
62 Suburban trailer?
63 The Trojans of
the Pac-12
64 “Alice” spinoff

By Matt Skoczen
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
03/31/16

03/31/16

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

RELEASE DATE– Thursday, March 31, 2016

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

xwordeditor@aol.com

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ATTRACTIVE WOMEN
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Great $! For interviews call the studio
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ARBOR PROPERTIES

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THESIS EDITING, LANGUAGE,
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734/996‑0566 or www.writeonA2.com
NEAR CAMPUS APARTMENTS
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2 Bed ‑ $1050 ‑ $1425
3 Bed ‑ $1955
Most include Heat and Water
Parking where avail is $50/m
Many are Cat Friendly
CAPPO 734‑996‑1991
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WORK ON MACKINAC Island
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SERVICES

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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT

Sports
The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com
Thursday, March 31, 2016 — 5A

More than a game for Halle Wangler

Senior leaves
Michigan with

few statistics but a

major impact

By BRAD WHIPPLE

Daily Sports Editor

In three years, Halle Wangler

has played just 20 minutes while
donning a Michigan uniform, but
she’s content with that.

In 18 games, the fifth-year

senior guard has scored only one
basket for the Wolverines, but that
doesn’t matter to her. She wouldn’t
want to be remembered for how
many points she scored anyway.

What matters to her is being

remembered for how she made
people feel.

“I’m a very loud and energetic

person,” Wangler said. “That
kind of shows (other players) that
it’s not just work. It’s just having
enthusiasm, love and passion that
you show through your work ethic
or just being on the court and what
you do.”

The road to Michigan was by no

means an easy one for Wangler. But
for her, basketball is therapeutic. It
has always been an outlet for her to
escape daily life, and having that
opportunity with the Wolverines is
one she has dreamt of as long as she
can remember.

Michigan has rooted itself

deeply into the Wangler family for
the past half-century, and it’s why
Halle felt like it was the right place
to be. Her father, John, played
quarterback from 1976 to 1980,
and now her brothers play under
that same banner.

While her father and brothers

are bound to the gridiron, Halle
found a place of her own — the
hardwood of Crisler Center. It
was almost by a stroke of luck
that Wangler ended up playing
at Michigan under fourth-year
coach Kim Barnes Arico, but luck
doesn’t explain it all.

* * *

If football in Ann Arbor is a

religion, Wangler never skipped
church. As a kid, the Royal Oak,
Mich., native always went to
games with her family, and John’s
connections
to
the
program

allowed his daughter to meet his
former teammates at the alumni
tent outside the Big House.

Wangler also met her father’s

former coach, Bo Schembechler,
who held her at football games
and regularly spoke with the
Wangler family.

At home, Halle’s grandparents

went “the whole nine yards” and
have decked out their Christmas
tree in maize and blue since the
’70s. According to John, they truly
“force-fed” the Michigan tradition
to the Wangler children.

“Growing up, it surrounds you,”

Halle said. “It becomes a part of
who you are.”

Oddly enough, though, Wangler

had the Michigan State bug up
until her early teens.

In her green and white phase,

Wangler had a signed photo of
Michigan State men’s basketball
coach Tom Izzo as well as an
autographed basketball in her
room. By chance, she played for
an AAU team called the Spartans
alongside current Michigan State
forward Aerial Powers.

Eventually, Wangler came to

the conclusion that Michigan was
where she was meant to be. In a
household built around the block
‘M’, it was almost inevitable.

“It was a battle, a tug of war for

her affections,” John said. “In the
end, she came to her senses.”

* * *

John Wangler never wanted

to push his kids into athletics.
If they gravitated toward them,
he’d do everything in his power
to help them be successful. But at
the end of the day, he just wanted
them to do whatever they were
passionate about.

Jack and Jared ultimately picked

football and now have spots on the
Michigan roster as a wide receiver
and linebacker, respectively. Sierra
is now a freshman at the University,
but isn’t involved in collegiate
athletics.

For Halle, having a basketball in

her hands just felt right.

“There’s nothing worse than if

your parent wants it more than the
child does,” John said. “That was
never the case. I’m happy with my
career and enjoyed every second
of it. I don’t have to live through
my kids.”

According to John, “genes and

ability can only take you so far”
in athletics. To him, the number
one thing he needed to instill
in his kids was a work ethic. If
the four Wanglers could put the
time in and be willing to work at
something, they were going to be
great at it.

Once a Michigan quarterback

under Schembechler, John knew
exactly what it took to be great.

After John worked his way

to the top of Michigan’s depth
chart, future NFL Hall of Famer
Lawrence Taylor sacked him in
the 1979 Gator Bowl, rupturing
two cross ligaments in his knee
and sending him on a long journey
toward recovery.

John returned for a fifth year

once his knee healed, but being
less than 100 percent made him
so frustrated that he considered
quitting the team. At one practice,
he
wasn’t
playing
well
and

Schembechler told him he was
the “dumbest quarterback in the
history of intercollegiate football,”
to which John replied, “That’s a
long time, coach.”

Given
John’s
arduous

recovery,
Schembechler

knew
the
worst
possible

punishment and kicked him out
of practice. But that, coupled
with a major tongue-lashing in
Schembechler’s office the next
day, didn’t stop Wangler from
fighting his way back to the top.

That year, the top was leading

Michigan to a 1981 Rose Bowl
victory in Pasadena, Calif.

Twenty-five years later, when

Halle — then a seventh grader
— had a bad game, she didn’t
get a “good job” from her father.
Instead, he cut right to the chase.

“You’ll be an average player,”

John told her, the same way
Schembechler would have told
him.

“Average” wasn’t in her father’s

vocabulary,
which
made
the

comment even more hurtful. But
Halle knew she didn’t want to be
average. She didn’t want her dad
to utter the word again.

That night, Halle went to the

backyard and started dribbling.

“If you hang in there, do what

you’re supposed do, you keep your
nose down and you stay focused,”
John said, “somehow you end
up coming out on top and end up
coming out of the pack.

“It’s not some crazy theory or

philosophy. It’s kind of a way of
life.”

Whether
it
was
a
crazy

philosophy or not, it was exactly
what his daughter needed to hear
years later when she considered
quitting basketball.

* * *

During Wangler’s freshman

year of high school, her mom
passed away.

“That had a very, very hard

impact on the kids,” John said.
“That’s a tough thing that no one
should have to deal with, and (my
kids have) come through it and
battled through it. There’s always

setbacks. Everybody gets knocked
down, and it’s how you get back
up. That’s how you’re judged.”

For an overwhelmed Halle,

throwing in the towel on basketball
seemed like a highly viable option.
Her
father

thought
differently.

He told her

she needed to
feel it out for
one more game.
If she gave it
her best effort
and played like
it was her last
game, she could
make a decision.

In that one game, Wangler had

a good enough performance to
realize basketball was something
she needed. She couldn’t afford to
give it up.

“I forgot about all the stuff

that was going on at home and
elsewhere,” Wangler said. “My
freshman year is when I realized
I can overcome anything that’s
thrown my way.

“Basketball was more than just

a sport. It was therapeutic for
me. It was my thing, (and) it has
helped me get through a lot, too.”

In high school at Royal Oak

Shrine,
Wangler
attended

both the boys and girls’ varsity

basketball
practices.
Outside regular
practice hours,
John or Shrine
women’s
basketball
coach
Bill

LeGault would
open
up
the

gym
for
her

whenever
she

wanted. Early in the morning or
late at night, Wangler dribbled
alone in a dedication to prove her
internal strength. Even at home,
she’d play pick-up games against
her brothers.

John
saw
his
daughter

was
obsessed
with
getting

better, obsessed with proving
herself. For Halle, that meant
playing collegiate basketball —
something that wasn’t average.

“She
threw
herself
into

basketball,” John said. “Even
when her mother passed, I think
that was her outlet. She really
put herself into it, and that really
was what took her mind off all
the hardship. I think it really was
a outlet for her and a release.”

During
her
early
years,

Wangler recalled conversations
she
had
with
Schembechler

as well as the stories she has
heard about Michigan’s revered
coach through her father. One of
Schembechler’s teachings stood
out the most: perseverance.

“(Bo) really knew how to push

you to the point where you didn’t
think you’d make it, but then you
made it and became great,” Halle
said. “Perseverance is something
that my dad learned from Bo,
because at one point, he didn’t
even think he was going to be
able to play football ever again.”

Wangler
didn’t
think
she

would play basketball either,
but in her junior year at Shrine,
she was offered a basketball
scholarship
from
Oakland

University. She accepted right
away and headed to Oakland in

the fall of 2011.

It wasn’t Michigan, but she

didn’t want to experience life
without basketball.

* * *

In
June
2013,
Oakland

women’s basketball coach Beckie
Francis was fired. A month later,
the Detroit Free Press released a
report in which 15 former players
stated Francis had “fixated on
their weights … pushed her
religious beliefs … (and) engaged
in intimidation and emotional
abuse.”
With
the
program

shrouded in controversy, Wangler
decided it was time to transfer.

Wangler had worked hard to

make it to the collegiate level,
and that progress was at stake.
The first obvious choice was
Michigan,
which
combined

academics,
basketball
and

family tradition all into one. The
Wolverines didn’t take many
walk-ons, so her father called
in a favor to Michigan men’s
basketball coach John Beilein,
whose son Mark had previously
worked for him.

Beilein briefed Barnes Arico

on what Michigan meant to
the Wanglers, and what the
Wanglers meant to Michigan.
It was a shot in the dark for
Halle, but when Barnes Arico
finally met her, she knew she had
discovered something unique.

“The
minute
I
had
an

opportunity to meet Halle, I
knew that I wanted her on our
team,” Barnes Arico said. “Her
enthusiasm, her passion, her zest
for life was something I wanted
our team to be around.”

Added Wangler: “I feel like

God puts you where you’re meant
to be at certain times in your life.
I think that my time in Oakland
was supposed to be then, and
then he put me here.”

The first week of Michigan

practice was excruciating for
Wangler, and all she could do
was laugh.

Oakland’s conditioning didn’t

nearly compare to Michigan’s.
From day one, the reality set in:
Welcome to the Big Ten.

Read the full version of this
story at MichiganDaily.com

DELANEY RYAN/Daily

Senior Halle Wangler has played sparingly since transferring from Oakland, but she’ll leave a legacy in the women’s basketball program with the character she showed.

“I forgot about all
the stuff that was
going on at home
and elsewhere.”

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