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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Tuesday, February 9, 2016

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

WEATHER
TOMORROW

Researchers find
use of the drug

negatively impacts
verbal recollection

By MADELINE GERSON

For the Daily

According to a recent study

by Deborah Levine, an assistant
professor at the University of
Michigan Medical School, long-
term marijuana use is associated
with poor verbal memory in
middle age.

Levine, who is an investigator

of risk development in coronary
arteries for young adults, practices
at both the University Hospital
and VA Ann Arbor Healthcare
System.

Levine, along with Reto Auer,

a researcher at the University of
Lausanne, Switzerland, compiled
data from a 25-year CARDIA
study, which analyzed cognitive
performance by observing and
calculating the verbal memory,
executive function and processing

speed of participants.

According to Levine, there

seemed to only be a correlation
between marijuana usage and
verbal memory, with no evidence
of an effect on processing speed or
executive function.

However, Levine emphasised

that correlation is not equivalent
to causation.

“Our results found a significant

association between long-term
marijuana use in early adulthood
and
decreased
cognitive

functioning at midlife,” Levine
said.
“However,
our
results

demonstrate an association and
do not prove causality.”

With
large
numbers
of

adolescent
and
young-adult

marijuana users and an ongoing
movement to decriminalize and
legalize marijuana, Levine said
the issue of the health effects
of marijuana is relevant. States
have legalized marijuana, and
many cities including Ann Arbor
have decriminalized its meaning.
According to the 2013 National
Survey on Drug Use and Health,
NSDUH, marijuana is the most

Thomas Perez said
businesses benefit
when they increase
benefits for workers

By CALEB CHADWELL

Daily Staff Reporter

U.S.
Secretary
of
Labor

Thomas Perez discussed ways for
businesses and the government to

create a more prosperous national
economy at the Ford School of
Public Policy Monday evening.

Appointed by President Barack

Obama, Perez has served as
labor secretary since 2013 on
Monday. Perez said the Obama
administration has helped create a
shared economic prosperity for all
by encouraging businesses to make
conscious decisions to benefit their
workers.

Discussing national economic

progress
during
the
Obama

administration, Perez noted that
the unemployment rate is now at
4.9 percent and that the number
of jobs has grown by 14 million,
according to the U.S. Bureau of
Labor Statistics.

Perez said this growth is in

part due to businesses’ starting to
realize how adequately providing
for their workers, pleasing their
shareholders and taking care of
their customers are not trade-
offs — successful businesses do all
three, and gain revenue by treating

their workers well.

“Businesses are seeing that

investing in their workers is one
of the best ways to grow the
bottom line,” Perez said. “They’re
embracing
what
Henry
Ford

embraced when he doubled the
wages of people on the assembly
line, understanding that better
paid workers are more productive
workers.”

Perez said businesses should not

view raising wages and increasing

See MARIJUANA, Page 2
See LABOR, Page 3

HALEY MCLAUGHLIN /Daily

U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez discusses the importance of worker voice and inclusive innovation in the production of a successful business model in
the Annenberg Auditorium on Monday.

Officials say

Flintwater.com
has illegally used
government logos

By LYDIA MURRAY

Daily Staff Reporter

Michigan Attorney General

Bill Schuette issued a warning
to Flintwater.com, a website
advertised as a charity raising
money to aid the Flint water
crisis, for potential charitable
solicitation
violations
on

Thursday.

The
website
was
using

logos
from
United
Way,

Pure
Michigan,
Flint

Water Response Team and
the
American
Red
Cross

without permission from the
organizations or notification
of their use, according to
Schuette’s office.

Earlier last week, Schuette

issued a consumer alert to
the public warning them to be
vigilant for potential charity
scams in relation to Flint. He
urged people to be cautious of
websites asking for personal
information and checks to
make sure the organization is
listed on the attorney general’s
website as a registered charity.

Andrea
Bitely,

communications
director

at
the
Michigan
attorney

general’s office, said both state
Sen. Jim Ananich (D-Flint)
and
United
Way,
a
local

charity, alerted the office of

the potential scam.

“Jim
Ananich
and
the

United Way both called our
office and let us know what
was going on,” she said. “We
sent them a cease and desist.
They can’t have those up.”

Pam Smith, president of

United Way of Washtenaw
County, said the organization
does everything it can to
prevent such scams, but often
has to rely on individuals
informing
it
of
potential

violations.

“We do the very best we can

to protect our brand,” she said.
“Anybody can grab a logo shot
off the Internet, so we rely
on our donors, our volunteers
and the general public to let us
know.”

Smith said after learning

about the misuse of their logo,
the organization took the
necessary steps immediately
to have it removed.

“Once we were made aware

of that, we immediately filed
a cease and desist order,” she
said. “The logo was taken
down the same day.”

According to Bitely, the

Michigan attorney general’s
office said their responses to
potential scams depend on the
nature of the issue.

“If it’s similar we will do

another cease and desist. If
it’s a door-to-door scam we
encourage the public to call
law enforcement,” she said
referring to Flintwater.com

Many
individuals
both

locally and nationwide have

See FLINT, Page 3

KRISTINA PERKINS/Daily

Marv Fox, personal trainer, basketball coach, and inspirational speaker, discusses the path to achieving personal
success at the 2nd Annual William Monroe Trotter Lecture in the Michigan Union on Monday.

Presenters at
the event urge

attendees to pursue

personal success

By BRANDON SUMMERS-

MILLER

Daily Staff Reporter

Speakers
challenged

University
students
and

faculty to succeed Monday
night during the second annual
William
Monroe
Trotter

lecture at the Michigan Union.

The annual lecture was

created as an opportunity for

Trotter to engage the public
with its works and also for
students and faculty to hear
the
stories
of
University

community members who have
been affected by racial inequity
or have overcome obstacles.

This
year,
the
lecture

featured remarks from Sean
Pitt, an LSA junior and Central
Student
Government
chief

of staff, Public Policy junior
Hattie McKinney, vice speaker
for the Black Student Union
and motivational speaker Marv
Fox Jr.

Pitt
emphasized
the

importance of speaking up on
the University’s campus.

“Your voice matters just as

much in a leadership role as it
does when you meet a friend
for coffee,” Pitt said. “Or make
any other decision that reflects
your values and your truth.”

McKinney
provided

historical
background
on

William Trotter, for whom
the
Trotter
Multicultural

Center was named, relating the
history of Trotter to students’
ability to gain and exhibit self
confidence. Trotter, an activist
for racial equality, experienced
segregation in the early 1900s
and worked to combat Klu
Klux Klan propaganda.

“Knowing who you are is

essential,”
McKinney
said.

See TROTTER, Page 3

Schlissel also

discusses ways to
augment minority

student experiences

By ISOBEL FUTTER

Daily Staff Reporter

University
President
Mark

Schlissel
joined
the
Senate

Advisory
Committee
on

University
Affairs’
meeting

Monday to talk about his goal to
increase collaboration among the
19 schools and colleges within
the University.

“The
current
system
and

model of the traditional and
decentralized
leadership
by

means of separate schools has
driven the schools to individual
excellence,” Schlissel said. “We
have left one more layer on top
that we’ve really tried to tap
into and that is the strategic
collaboration
between
our

schools.”

Schlissel also said he hopes

collaboriting
on
issues
will

excite not only those inside
the University, but the larger
community as well.

“I value scholarship where

it’s scholars talking to other
scholars,
because
long-term

insight comes out of that,” he
said. “I also value scholarship
that produces things that the
public can understand and can
really emotionally engage with.”

Schlissel
said
this
public

engagement reinforces the value
of the University and informs
others of what goes on at the

See SACUA, Page 3

Study links
marijuana
use to loss
in memory

RESEARCH

U.S. Labor Sec. discusses
ways to improve economy

AG says scams
targeting Flint
crisis charities

GOVERNMENT

Speakers at W.M. Trotter
lecture stress individuality

Members of
SACUA talk
interschool
collaboration

ACADEMICS

INDEX
Vol. CXXV, No. 69
©2016 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL ASSIFIEDS.................6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

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