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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, February 5, 2016

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

INDEX
Vol. CXXV, No. 67
©2016 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

CL ASSIFIEDS.................6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
GOP to hold March presidential debate in Detroit
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/SECTIONS/NEWS

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news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

WEATHER
TOMORROW

HI: 39

LO: 24

University alum

Dick Costolo

explores successful

leadership

By REBECCA SOLBERG

Daily Staff Reporter

It took him over 140 characters,

but former Twitter CEO Dick
Costolo spoke to a filled Rackham
Graduate
School
auditorium

Thursday on how he has found
value in his liberal arts degree

from the University throughout
his career.

LSA Dean Andrew Martin, who

introduced Costolo to the crowd
of hundreds, proclaimed at the
lecture’s start, “What a great day to
be a Wolverine!”

Costolo said in his speech he

aimed to inspire and highlight
the merit of a liberal arts degree,
which he said can be viewed as
“impractical” in Silicon Valley. He
disputed this opinion by explaining
how his LSA education fueled his
leadership skills and broadened his
understanding of the world.

“A broad liberal arts degree, and

deep immersion in the humanities
is actually vital to developing
our very best leaders and in fact
without that education, none of
you would develop the habits of
mind, and frameworks for creative
synthesis and lateral thinking, that
really make the very best leaders in
the world,” he said.

Costolo said he believes great

leaders
possess
five
speccific

qualities: They make decisions
rapidly and adapt to dynamic
environments when there are no
road maps or obvious choices;
they
creatively
synthesize

information and provide context

for decisions that are to be made
across disciplines, cultures and
perspectives; they inspire and
build trust in any collaborative
environment
by
welcoming

viewpoints different than their
own; they are never in reaction;
they are kind without being weak
and
confident
without
being

“jerks.”

But to achieve these attributes

of a leader, Costolo said their
education is key.

“They need to have a few habits

of
mind
uniquely
developed

through
deep
curiosity
and

See COSTOLO, Page 2

Vocal instructor’s

mentorship

supported diversity

on campus

By CAMY METWALLY

Daily Staff Reporter

Dozens gathered in the School of

Music, Theatre & Dance’s Stamps
Auditorium on Thursday night
to commemorate George Shirley,
University emeritus professor of
voice, as the recipient of the 2016
Shirley Verrett Award.

Established in 2011, the Women

of Color in the Academy Project
presents the annual award, which
includes a $5,000 stipend, to a
University faculty member whose
work supports the success of
female students and faculty in
the arts who come from diverse
backgrounds.
The
Women
of

Color in the Academy Project is
a campus-wide faculty network
that provides support for the
development of scholars who are
women of color.

Attendees at Thursday’s event

included
community
members

from
Shirley’s
hometown
of

Detroit and a number of current
students and colleagues.

“Music feeds my soul,” Shirley

said. “It feeds my spirit, and to
share this moment with people,
some of whom I don’t know, many
of whom I do, it’s indescribably
delicious.”

Opera singer Marcia Porter

performed
at
the
ceremony

followed by a performance by
one of Shirley’s current students,
School of Music, Theatre & Dance
graduate
student
Kaswanna

Kanyinda. Her first piece, she
explained, told the story of a
person who experienced trials and
tribulations while working toward
a goal, and the second song was
about how the individual became
lost to the world after reaching
that goal.

Kanyinda celebrated Shirley

through song, attributing many of
her successes and accomplishments
to his instruction.

“He helped me to understand

that music isn’t about perfection,”
Kanyinda said. “It’s about sharing
who you are, what you’ve been
through and who you could
be through song. I know that I
wouldn’t be on this path, and I
know I wouldn’t have achieved
what I have without this man’s
guidance.”

School of Music, Theatre &

Dance graduate student Dorian
Dillard II also attended the
ceremony
to
honor
Shirley’s

mentorship. He said he met Shirley
in 2011 when he won second place
in the first George Shirley African
American Art Song and Operatic
Aria Competition. Since then,
Dillard said, Shirley has served as
a mentor and father figure to him
and others.

“It’s an honor to be in the

presence of a legend,” Dillard said.

See SHIRLEY, Page 3

Program strives

to increase

health options in

Southeast Michigan

By DESIREE CHEW

Daily Staff Reporter

This
summer,
Michigan

Forward in Enhancing Research
and Community Equity will
launch
the
Health
Access

Initiative,
a
free
quality-

improvement program for clinics
and health centers in Southeast
Michigan aimed at providing
better care for LGBTQ youth.

MFierce
was
founded
in

September 2014 with the aim
of dealing with societal health
disparities via a participatory,
community-based approach of
structural change. It is funded by
the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention.

MFierce
Project
Director

Triana Kazaleh Sirdenis said the
organization focuses on systemic
problems rather than individual
interventions.

“Besides being participatory,

the other part that makes MFierce
different is that it is involved

with structural change,” Sirdenis
said. “Currently there are a lot of
programs focused on changing
individual behavior, for example
how to use a condom, how to
have safer sex negotiations — but
these are more on the person-to-
person level.”

“So this structural change

works to impact the bigger
systems and policies, as well
as take into account existing
policies that could be affecting
quality of care,” she added.

MFierce
is
a
three-part

coalition, according to Sirdenis.
The first entity is the steering
committee, composed of different
community leaders, CEOs, AIDS
service organizations, LGBTQ
groups, state and county health
departments. Also involved are
public health researchers in the
Center for Sexuality and Health
Disparities,
or
the
SexLab.

The final piece is the Youth
Advisory Board, which is made
up of LGBTQ youth from all over
Southeast Michigan.

Marcos
Carrillo,
biology

junior at Henry Ford Community
College, is a member of the
Youth Advisory Board. He said
his decision to join MFierce was
deeply motivated by personal

See HEALTH, Page 3

MATT VAILLIENCOURT/Daily

Twitter CEO Dick Costolo, a University alum, discusses his career path and the field of communications at a talk sponsored by the Ford School of Public Policy at
Rackham Auditorium on Thursday.

Frontrunner
candidate took

several risks in first

caucus state

By EMMA KINERY

Daily News Editor

In a speech before his loss

at the Iowa caucuses Monday,
Donald Trump said he felt
“guilty” about not spending

enough money in the state.

“I’m self-funding my own

campaign, it’s my money,”
Trump said. “So far I have
spent very little money, very
little. I need to start spending
for two reasons: Number one,
I feel guilty. Number two, I
don’t want to take a chance.”

At the time, Trump used

his guilt as a jab, ascribing
it to his then-success in the
polls over other candidates,
namely Jeb Bush, who spent
significant amounts of money

in the state without seeing
correspondingly
large
poll

numbers. But, by spending
little in Iowa Trump had
already taken a chance —
one that may now lead to a
different kind of guilt down
the road.

The erstwhile frontrunner

in the Republican race for
the presidential nomination
took several risks in Iowa,
including not showing up to
a debate — and for the most

See TRUMP, Page 3

Professor discusses

Western ideals
in relation to
Islamophobia

By AUSTIN HIYAMA

For the Daily

History
Prof.
Juan
Cole

examined the rise of Islamophobia
in the Western world in response
to recent waves of anti-Muslim
sentiment following a series of
attacks
attributed
to
Islamic

extremists. At the event, which
was attended by about 50 students
and hosted by the University’s
Muslim Students’ Association,
Cole kicked off the talk by
defining the “American identity.”
The identity, he said, truly began
with the idea of manifest destiny
— an ideology asserting that
Americans in the 19th century
were destined to expand the
United States to the Western coast
— and the subsequent expansion
into Western frontier. He also
said he felt the centrality of the
frontier in America’s identity was
responsible for the centrality of
the military.

See COLE, Page 3

GRANT HARDY/Daily

Presidential hopeful Donald Trump points out people in the audience that he thinks would have good aim,
referencing the Second Amendment, at a rally in Cedar Rapids, IA on February 1, 2016

Ex-Twitter CEO discusses
importance of liberal arts

Professor
lauded for
dedication
to students

ACADEMICS

Group aims to
boost care for
LGBTQ youth

HOSPITAL

In Iowa, Trump’s confidence

ends in second place

CAMPUS LIFE
Prof. talks
anti-Muslim
sentiments
in the U.S.

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