100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 20, 2015 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Friday, November 20, 2015

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Students reflect on

progress toward
goals, current
campus climate

By ALYSSA BRANDON

Daily Staff Reporter

As the Black Student Union

honors the second anniversary
of its 2013 #BBUM Twitter

campaign, dozens crowded into
the Trotter House Multicultural
Center on Thursday night for
a candid conversation on the
lasting impacts of the campaign
on the University.

Started by Black Student Union

members as way for students of
color to share their experiences
as Black students on campus,
in
November
2013,
#BBUM

went viral, accumulating more
than 10,000 tweets by the first
evening of its launch.

The
movement
captivated

the attention of the University
community and inspired similar
efforts at other college campuses.

During
Thursday’s
event,

which was hosted by the BSU,
members displayed tweets from
2014 that were critical of the
#BBUM movement.

Some
attendees
connected

negative reactions to #BBUM
with
negative
reactions
to

arecent campus demonstration
on the Diag in solidarity with

protests at the University of
Missouri.

Several
shared
Facebook

comments and tweets posted
during
and
after
the
Diag

demonstration. Another student
shared an anecdote of a friend
being threatened by a white
man not to participate in the
demonstration.

During the event, University

alum Veniece Session said there
are still strides to be made

LEFT: LSA sophomore Breanna Wyrick talks about her personal experiences with #BBUM during the two-year commemoration at the Trotter Multicultural
Center on Thursday. RIGHT: University alum Rayonna Andrews performs a self-choreographed dance during the #BBUM commemoration talk.

January strategic

meeting marks

third year board has

met privately

By LARA MOEHLMAN

Daily Staff Reporter

At Thursday’s meeting of the

University’s Board of Regents,
Regent Shauna Ryder Diggs (D)
announced that the board will
participate in a private session
in January in lieu of its regular
monthly meeting.

The regents have held private,

strategic planning sessions in
January for the past three years.
A private session was held in
California in 2013, New York in
2014 and Ann Arbor in 2015. This
year’s session is slated to be held
in Detroit.

Before 2013, a regular meeting

open to the public was usually
held in January.

“Holding an annual strategic

planning session has proven
very useful to the regents and
to the University,” Ryder Diggs,
who chairs the board, said at
Thursday’s meeting.

University spokesman Rick

Fitzgerald said the board had
the opportunity to interact with
other leaders in higher education
from different parts of the
country during previous strategic
sessions.

“This is really an opportunity

for
the
board
to
do
some

strategic thinking in a less formal
atmosphere where there’s no
decisions being made,” he said.
“It’s just sort of a blue sky kind of
session.”

During their 2014 trip to New

York, the board met with leaders
from several colleges on the East
Coast, including William Bowen,
Princeton University professor
emeritus,
Yale
University

President Peter Salovey, Michael
Johns, retired executive vice
president for health affairs at
Emory University and Edward

See #BBUM, Page 3
See REGENTS, Page 3

Zinc-oxide could

coat medical

devices to prevent
bacteria’s spread

By TOM MCBRIEN

Daily Staff Reporter

In the hands of University

researchers, sunscreen may do
more than just protect our skin:
It might also protect our medical
devices from bacteria that kill
more than 100,000 Americans
every year.

In a paper published Oct.

27, a University research team
showed
that
coating
objects

with nanoparticles of zinc oxide,
a key ingredient in sunscreen,
reduced the growth of a species
of antibiotic-resistant bacteria by
95 percent.

In
hospitals,
where

antibiotics are used extensively,
particularly dangerous bacteria
like
methicillin
resistant

Staphylococcus
aureus

or

MRSA — evolve because they
are able to survive antibiotic
treatments. If these bacteria get
on objects like replacement joints,
artificial heart valves or screws
used
with
common
athletic

injuries, they can multiply inside
a patient’s body and cause severe
infections that can’t easily be
cured with antibiotics.

If bacteria can’t grow on the

objects in the first place, however,
antibiotic resistance poses less of
a problem. This is where the zinc
oxide nanoparticles could help.

Medical
School
Lecturer

J. Scott VanEpps, head of the
research team that presented
the
findings,
said
the
field

of
antibacterial
coatings
is

important because of its life-
saving implications.

“About
a
million
medical

devices
are
infected
every

year,” VanEpps said. “The best
way to treat this is often to
take the infected device out.
It’s relatively simple if you’re
removing
something
like
a

catheter. But when you’re talking
about removing a heart valve or
prosthetic joint, that requires a
long, taxing surgery that could
involve complications.”

Engineering
Prof.
Nicholas

Kotov is head of the chemical
engineering
laboratory
that

synthesized the nanoparticles.
While
zinc
oxide’s
bacteria-

fighting properties are relatively
well known, examining different
shapes it forms on the nanoscopic
scale is an area of active research.
The
researchers
examined

whether
the
shape
of
the

particles mattered, testing three
different types: spheres, plates
and pyramids with hexagonal
bases. They produced four kinds
of pegs: uncoated, coated with
spheres, coated with plates and
coated with hexagonal pyramids.

VanEpps’s team took pegs and

put them in a bacteria-growing
environment. After giving the
bacteria 24 hours to grow, they
found that the pegs coated with
the nanopyramids had 95 percent
fewer Staph bacteria — including
MRSA — than the uncoated pegs.

While
the
researchers

know that the nanopyramids

DELANEY RYAN/Daily

Law student Sarah Alsaden shines the light from her phone at a rally in support of Syrian refugees in the Law Quad
on Thursday. The Racial Justice Coalition and the Muslim Law Students Association held the rally as a response to
spreading Islamophobia following the terrorist attacks in Paris last week.

Event aims to
counter spread
of Islamophobic

sentiments

By LYDIA MURRAY

Daily Staff Reporter

Omar El-Halwagi, a second

year
Law
student,
began

Thursday night’s vigil — held for
the victims of recent terrorist
attacks in Paris and Beirut —
with an anecdote.

He told of a boy in Texas who

donated all the money in his
piggy bank to the local mosque
after hearing it was vandalized
in wake of the attacks.

“As
we
are
here
today

reflecting
on
peace,
we’re

reflecting on the attacks, we’re
reflecting on Islamophobia and

racism on our campus and the
marginalization of voices of
color,” he said. “Every now and
then, all you need is a glimpse of
hope.”

That was the message as

about 50 students gathered
in the Law Quadrangle for a
peace rally which addressed
recent waves of Islamophobia
following the attacks. The attack
in Paris spurred an increase
in
discriminatory
backlash

toward Muslims, particularly
Syrian refugees fleeing ISIS for
the United States. Michigan
Gov. Rick Snyder, along with
several dozen other governors,
have called for a temporary or
permanent halt to the entry of
Syrian refugees into their states.

Organized
by
the
Racial

Justice Coalition and the Muslim
Law Student Association, aimed
to give students the opportunity
to express their feelings about

the attacks, as well as voice
concerns about Islamophobia as
a reaction to them.

The Islamic State claimed

responsibility for the Nov. 13
attacks, which killed 129 people,
on Saturday, according to the
Washington Post.

El-Halwagi,
who
is
the

co-president of MLSA, opened
the rally by reflecting on his
reaction to the Paris attacks, as
well as separate attacks in Beirut
Nov. 12 in which a pair of suicide
bombers killed 43 people and
injured 239 others.

“(I
felt)
this
feeling
of

hopelessness when last Friday
I learned about the over 130
people who were killed in Paris,
while I was still dealing with
the hopelessness from the day
before as those same individuals
were killed in Beirut,” he said.
“While I was then dealing with

See SUNSCREEN, Page 3
See PEACE, Page 3

Initiative follows
death of ‘U’ alum
from co-ingestion
of adderall, alcohol

By JACKIE CHARNIGA

Daily Staff Reporter

Central
Student

Government will partner with
the College of Pharmacy and
Wolverine Wellness to launch
a prescription drug misuse
awareness campaign during
the Winter 2016 semester.

The initiative was driven in

part by the death of University
alum Josh Levine, who passed
away from an overdose after
mixing adderall with alcohol
at a party.

The campaign aims to

focus
on
the
correlation

between academic pressures
and drug abuse, and will
launch at a time when the
CSG representatives planning
the event said they expect
on-campus drug use to spike
— during midterms.

LSA junior David Schafer,

a CSG representative working
on the project, said it is
important to raise awareness
about how academic pressure
can impact drug abuse and
the effects of that abuse,
particularly
on
college

campuses.

A
survey
from
the

University Substance Abuse
Research Center found that
Adderall
ranked
second

See CSG, Page 3

INDEX
Vol. CXXV, No. 34
©2015 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

ARTS.......................... 5A

SPORTS ......................7A

SUDOKU..................... 3A

CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Professors develop defense against coffee fungus
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/SECTION/NEWS

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

WEATHER
TOMORROW

HI: 40

LO: 32

Regents to
hold closed
session in
Detroit

ADMINISTRATION

BSU gathers at Trotter to
mark two years of #BBUM

Key sunscreen
ingredient may
halt infections

Students hold rally for peace
in response to ISIS attacks

CSG plans
campaign
to combat
drug misuse

RESEARCH
STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan