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November 05, 2015 - Image 1

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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Thursday, November 5, 2015

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

A look at the Blind Pig’s annual
Halloween Band Masquerade
» INSIDE

the b-side

Five additional
school districts

could offer tuition

scholarships

By EMMA KINERY

Daily Staff Reporter

Michigan state legislators are

pushing to expand a program that
currently provides free under-

graduate college tuition to certain
students in 10 of the state’s school
districts.

Senate Bill 0539, which passed

the state Senate last week, would
allow for the establishment of
more “promise zones” in the
state of Michigan. The zones are
modeled after the Kalamazoo
Promise, which guarantees schol-
arships at in-state public colleges
to students in Kalamazoo who
have been enrolled in the school
district for a set number of years.

Established in 2005, the pro-

gram was the first of its kind in
the United States. Current legis-
lation only allows for 10 promise
zones in the state of Michigan.
The bill proposes increasing the
maximum number to 15. There
are 10 current promise zone dis-
tricts in the state, which include
Baldwin
Community
Schools,

Battle Creek Public Schools,
Detroit Public Schools, Jack-
son Public Schools, the Lansing
School District, the School Dis-

trict of the City of Pontiac and the
Saginaw School District.

Promise scholarships cover

tuition
costs
beyond
federal

financial
aid
awards.
Those

scholarships are funded through
private contributions and a mech-
anism called tax capture — in
which the promise zone captures
some of the growth in the State
Education Tax.

The amount of tuition cover-

age students receive through
the Kalamazoo Promise var-

ies based on how long they have
been enrolled in school in the dis-
trict. For example, students who
attended kindergarten through
senior year in Kalamazoo Pub-
lic Schools receive 100 percent
tuition coverage, while students
who attended from only sopho-
more year on are not eligible
for any coverage. On top of the
enrollment requirements, stu-
dents must maintain a 2.0 average
GPA while in college.

State allocates
funding for off-
campus sexual

assault prevention

By ALLANA AKHTAR

Daily Staff Reporter

Gov. Rick Snyder’s admin-

istration awarded $500,000
on Thursday to fund sexual
assault prevention initiatives
at universities across the state.
The University will receive
$20,000 to fund “Raise the
Bar,” a new program to train
staff at Ann Arbor bars to
intervene in situations that
may result in sexual assault.

The University is working

alongside Wolverine Wellness
and the Ann Arbor Campus
Community Coalition, a local
group dedicated to reducing
alcohol-related harm, to train
local business owners to rec-
ognize and successfully inter-
vene in harmful situations.

“We are really excited about

this project because we are
taking our bystander inter-
vention efforts off of cam-
pus and into the community
where often the trajectory of
harm begins,” said Holly Rid-
er-Milkovich, director of the
University’s Sexual Assault
Prevention
and
Awareness

Thursday’s session

will also focus

on deer cull plan,

sustainability

By LEA GIOTTO

Daily Staff Reporter

The Ann Arbor City Council

will meet Thursday to consider
resolutions on several topics,
including a complaint related to
the University fraternity Alpha
Sigma Phi, a deer cull, the city’s
energy and sustainability and the
purchase of vehicles for the Ann
Arbor Fire Department.

Possible investigation of fra-

ternity nuisance complaints

Council will vote on wheth-

er to approve a resolution that
would permit City Attorney Ste-
phen Postema to investigate nui-
sance complaints at Alpha Sigma
Phi’s fraternity house on 920
Baldwin Ave.

The resolution is sponsored by

Councilmember Stephen Kunsel-
man (D–Ward 3). On Wednesday,
Kunselman told the Daily he
wouldn’t comment on the issue
until Thursday’s meeting.

Resolution to allow the posses-

sion and discharge of weapons in
public places for deer cull

The council will also address

the city’s deer management pro-
gram Thursday night, as the
representatives will vote on a
resolution to allow a temporary
moratorium on Chapter 115 of the
city code. The chapter prohibits
the possession and discharge of
weapons in public places, and a
temporary moratorium would
allow a deer cull in Wards 1 and 2
of Ann Arbor this winter.

The cull would be carried out

“at night with noise-suppressed
firearms using trained person-
nel with experience in conduct-
ing a cull in an urban setting,”
according to Thursday’s meeting
agenda.

On Aug. 17, the City Council

adopted a deer management pro-

At 20th annual

Waggoner lecture,

president talks

campus misconduct

By NABEEL CHOLLAMPAT

Daily Staff Reporter

University President Mark

Schlissel delivered the 20th

Annual Raymond W. Waggoner
Lectureship on Ethics and Val-
ues in Medicine on Thursday.
The topic he chose to discuss:
sexual misconduct.

An audience of medical pro-

fessionals and a handful of stu-
dents crowded the University
Hospital’s Ford Auditorium for
the lecture, named for the late
Raymond Waggoner, professor
emeritus and chairman of the
Department of Psychiatry.

Schlissel’s
lecture,
titled

“Making U-M Safer for Stu-
dents: Confronting the Chal-
lenge of Sexual Misconduct,”
mainly focused on the obstacles
facing the investigation of sexual
assault on campus.

“Although there are ethics in

all aspects of science, I’ve decid-
ed to speak about a topic that I’ve
been dealing with a lot as a Uni-
versity president,” he said. “It

Research could pave
way for developing
immunotherapy

treatments

By ALEXA ST. JOHN

Daily Staff Reporter

When
cancer
cells
and

immune T-cells compete for
glucose, more commonly known
as sugar, cancer cells will win,
according to new University
research. According to the study,
which was released Tuesday, the
competition results in unhealthy
immune system T-cells that are
unable to fight the cancer.

Conducted
by
researchers

from the University’s Medical
School, the study focused on
the human cancer microenvi-
ronment, which holds the key
to understanding the immune
system’s response to cancer-
ous tumors and the patient’s
response to therapy.

See MICHIGAN, Page 7A

See GRANTS, Page 3A

See COUNCIL, Page 3A
See ETHICS, Page 2A
See CANCER, Page 2A

GOVERNMENT

MEETING PREVIEW
MEDICINE

DAVID SONG/Daily

At Ford Auditorium on Wednesday, University President Mark Schlissel discussed University actions and policies on
sexual assault and outlined plans to decrease overall incidences.

MARINA ROSS/Daily

LEFT: Michigan alum Dani Vignos, the owner of University Flower Shop, arranges a bouquet on Wednesday. CENTER: Ali A. Amiri carries on daily tasks at the Persian House of Imports, which he owns.
RIGHT: Washtenaw Community College student Miles Larson browses through vinyl at Encore Records.

BUSINESS A S USUAL

See PROMISE, Page 3A

Grant to
offer bars
bystander
training

Bill to expand Mich. promise zones

A2 Council to
consider frat
investigation

Schlissel highlights sexual
assault in lecture on ethics

Study finds
cancer cells
beat T-cells
for glucose

INDEX
Vol. CXXV, No. 24
©2015 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

SPORTS ......................7A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

CL ASSIFIEDS............... 5A

B - S I D E . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
University receives funding for brain research
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/SECTION/NEWS

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