100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 16, 2015 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wednesday, September 16, 2015

CELEBRATING OUR ONE-HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 126
©2015 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

ARTS.......................... 5A

SPORTS ......................7A

CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A

T H E S TAT E M E N T. . . . . . . .1 B

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
‘U’ employee dies in Chemistry Building
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/NEWS

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

WEATHER
TOMORROW

HI: 81

LO: 55

the statement

GOVERNMENT

Federal resouce
to provide data on
costs, financial aid

by school

By SAMI WINTNER

Daily Staff Reporter

With college application sea-

son in full swing, the White
House launched a new initiative
Saturday to provide a compre-
hensive college data source for
prospective undergraduates.

The
College
Scorecard


which includes data by college
on cost of attendance, graduation
rates and student loan debt — is
intended to help families deter-
mine which schools may be the
best fit. The scorecard also con-
textualizes each school’s set of
data by providing comparisons to
national averages.

The site also links to resources

that provide students with infor-
mation on federal financial aid
packages, as well as a tool that
forecasts the federal aid students

would likely receive.

Along with the rollout, the

U.S. Department of Education
highlighted the University’s for
its high graduation rate and low
costs for low-income students.
The University was one of 30
schools to make the list, which
included several Ivy League
schools like Harvard Univer-
sity and Yale University. Only six
public universities made the list,
including two of the University’s
peer institutions, the University
of Virginia and the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Obama has recently intro-

duced several policy initiatives
focused on higher education,
including a plan to move the Free
Application for Federal Student
Aid deadline forward to align
the delivery of aid packages with
college decisions, as well as a
$175-million grant competition
to promote apprenticeships.

Along with First Lady Michelle

Obama, Dr. Jill Biden and Secre-
tary of Education Arne Duncan,
Obama is leading a nationwide tour
focused on education. The presi-

See SCORECARD, Page 3A

School of Music, Dance and Theater freshmen Cailin Ferguson (left) and Alyssa Gorman (right) dance improv under trees outside the Central Campus
Recreation Building for a dance composition class on Tuesday.

DANCES WITH TRE ES

Mechanism

developed at ‘U’

could also improve

early detection

By IRENE PARK

Daily Staff Reporter

University researchers pub-

lished a study last week that

could lead to a lower mortality
rate for breast cancer patients.

Lonnie Shea, professor of bio-

medical engineering and chemi-
cal engineering, and Jacqueline
Jeruss, associate professor of
surgery, developed a device to
attract and capture cancer cells.
The aim: improve early detec-
tion of breast cancer that spread
to other organs — such as lungs,
liver, brain and bones — and form
tumors, which is called metasta-

sic breast cancer. This can subse-
quently cause organ failure.

The study, published in Nature

Communications, reports the
device can not only aid early
diagnosis, but also prevent breast
cancer’s further spread.

Shea said metastasis is often

discovered when the tumor has
already spread to other organs and
the organs’ functions are impaired.

“Unfortunately, the available

therapies are not very effective

at that point,” Shea said.

According to the National

Cancer Institute, breast cancer is
the second most common cancer
for women in the United States,
and the second leading cause of
cancer-related deaths in women.
There are about 230,000 new
cases in women and 2,300 cases
in men each year.

The
porous,
sponge-like

device described in the study is

SCIENCE

See BREAST CANCER, Page 3A

RESEARCH

Study finds daily use
climbed nationally,
though prevalence in
A2 remains unclear

By KATIE PENROD

Daily Staff Reporter

Students in the United States

are using marijuana at the high-
est rate since 1980, according
to recent results from a survey
conducted by the University’s
Institute for Social Research.
Though the numbers attracted
significant attention nationally,
it’s unclear whether the findings
mirror trends at the University.

The study, funded by the

National
Institute
on
Drug

Research and conducted annu-
ally for the past 35 years, found
that one in 17 college students
smokes marijuana on a daily or
near-daily basis.

The number of students who

said they had used marijuana
within the past 30 days also
increased in recent years, from

17 percent in 2006 to 21 percent
in 2014. Additionally, the per-
centage of students who said
they had smoked in the past
year increased from 30 percent
in 2006 to 34 percent in 2014.

Lloyd Johnston, a research

professor and senior research
assistant at the Institute for
Social Research, said the sur-
vey doesn’t provide a defini-
tive answer as to whether these
trends apply at the University.
Because the survey pulled from
students nationwide, there is no
data specific to Ann Arbor.

However, he said because the

University is academically rig-
orous and selective, marijuana
use might not be as prevalent
compared to other schools.

On the other hand, John-

ston said the perception of
marijuana’s risks has decreased
in recent years, leading to
increased use in many parts of
the United States. The survey
found the percentage of high
school graduates, ages 19 to 22,
who thought marijuana was
dangerous decreased from 55

Pollack: Proposal
could decrease

alcohol consumption

on Thursdays

By SHOHAM GEVA

Daily News Editor

University Provost Martha

Pollack said Tuesday she was
supportive of a faculty recom-

mendation that more classes
be held on Friday to address
excess student drinking.

The Senate Advisory Com-

mittee on University Affairs
suggested the proposal Mon-
day during their weekly meet-
ing, which Pollack attended.

“I am very concerned — I

think as is (University Presi-
dent Mark Schlissel), and Vice
President (for Student Life E.
Royster) Harper — about the
issue of drinking on campus,”

Pollack said in an interview
with The Michigan Daily. “And
we do know that one of the
issues is that now the weekend
often spans three days and that
there is a problem with Thurs-
day evening drinking and there
is research that shows that Fri-
day classes cut down on Thurs-
day-evening
drinking.
So,

because I actually care quite
deeply about the safety and
well-being of our students, I

See MARIJUANA, Page 6A
See PROVOST, Page 6A

RITA MORRIS/Daily

Engineering sophomore Jacob Lutz plays pool with friends at the Michigan Union Pool Room on Tuesday.

BILLIARDS BONANZ A

ACADEMICS

Early-bird hours
draw hundreds of
students before

Oregon St. matchup

By JACKIE CHARNIGA

Daily Staff Reporter

Central Student Government

convened for their second meet-
ing of the semester on Tuesday to
outline several initiatives for the
upcoming year. Dean of Students
Laura Blake Jones also addressed
the assembly to promote a close
working
relationship
between

CSG and her office.

CSG President Cooper Charl-

ton, an LSA senior, also lauded the
assembly’s joint initiative with
University Dining to open din-
ing halls on last Saturday’s game
day up to three hours earlier than
normal weekend hours. The effort
aimed to curb unsafe drinking by
providing students, particularly
freshmen, access to food before
tailgating activities.

See CSG, Page 3A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

RUBY WALLAU/Daily
EMILIE FARRUGIA/Daily

» INSIDE

Toeing the line: Navigating
roommate conflict at the ‘U’

New college
‘scorecard’
aims to aid
applicants

New device could prevent
the spread of breast cancer

Marijuana use
among students
reaches new high

Provost open to idea of
increasing Friday courses

CSG touts
success of
game day
dining plan

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan