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February 18, 2015 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

CELEBRATING OUR ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

$677,000

$629,000

Average Female
Presidents’ Salary

PEER INSTITUTIONS

PRESIDENTIAL SALARIES

Average Male

Presidents’ Salary

3.32%

‘14-’15

3.67%

4.70%

4.09%

4.86%

6.28%

2.96%

5.45%

6.03%

4.51%

3.68%

4.81%

5.39%

4.22%

2.05%

1.50%

4.81%4.83%

5.18%

3.87%

3.14%

2.76%

4.03%

5.46%

6%

3%

4%

2%

1%

5%

WAGES FOR

UNIVERSITY EXECUTIVES

3.63%

‘03-’04

‘04-’05

‘05-’06

‘06-’07

‘07-’08

‘08-’09

‘09-’10

‘10-’11

‘11-’12

‘12-’13

‘13-’14

Female

Male

Athletic Director

Female

Male

Chief Information Officer

Chief Financial Officer

Hospital CEO

Athletic Director

Chief Information Officer

President
President

Executive Vice President and

Chief Financial Officer

Provost

Provost

Executive Vice President

for Medical Affairs

Executive Vice President

for Medical Affairs

Interim CFO
President

Dean of Engineering

Dean of Business School

Interim Executive Vice President

for Medical Affairs

Vice President of Research

Vice President of Research
Vice President of Development

General Counsel

General Counsel

Vice President of Development

Vice President of Development

Dean of Medical School

Interim Athletic Director

Chief Information Officer

Former Law

TOP 10 UNIVERSITY EXECUTIVE

SALARIES BY YEAR

Hospital CEO

2014
2012

2013

2013 POSITION

SALARY DIFFERENCES

-14%

43%

30%

-13%

0%

4%

16%

-3%

14%

39%

-9%

13%

-27%

2%

2%

25%

2%

-14%

9%

4%

17%

26%

7%

10%

-9%

66%

17%

PRESIDENT

PROVOST

EVPMA

SEC

VP STUDENT

VP GOV'T

VP COMM

GENERAL COUNSEL

VP RESEARCH

VP DEVELOPMENT

CFO

ROSS DEAN

MED DEAN

LAW DEAN

SSW DEAN

PHARM DEAN

PUB HEALTH

LSA DEAN

GRAD DEAN

PUB POL DEAN

INFO DEAN

URB PLAN DEAN

NURSING DEAN

EDUCTATION DEAN

ART SCHOOL DEAN

DENTIST DEAN

ENGINEERING DEAN

Female

Male

Students examine
diversity and beliefs
through open-mic

performances

By LAURA SCHINAGLE

For the Daily

As part of the LSA Honors Pro-

gram’s second annual Diversity
Monologues, students gathered
in South Quad’s Java Blue Cafe
on Tuesday evening for open-mic
style performances based on the
theme, “This I Believe.”

The Monologue series aims

to facilitate conversation about
identity and diversity through
open-mic events. The theme was
inspired by a similar National

Public Radio program of the
same name. Clips from the NPR
program were played to bookend
the performances.

LSA senior Harleen Kaur, a

Diversity Monologues co-found-
er and event organizer, said she
and others came up with the idea
during the peak of social activism
movements on campus last year,
such as #BBUM and #UMDivest.

“We were talking about how

to bring these conversations of
identity and diversity to Honors
in a very safe space and a creative
space that would be very sup-
portive for those who are choos-
ing to share their experiences,”
Kaur said.

Organizers said the theme of

Tuesday’s event was purpose-
fully vague to cast a wide net

Assembly also
discusses course
evaluation data

By TANAZ AHMED

Daily Staff Reporter

During Central Student Gov-

ernment’s Tuesday meeting, the
body considered a proposal to
create a new University spirit
song and discussed a resolution
that would request the Univer-
sity release results from student-
completed course evaluations.

After prompting discussion

at last week’s CSG meeting, the
topic of “Hail and Unite” — a

National data
shows salaries

may skew in favor
of men, ‘U’ data

suggests otherwise

By ALLANA AKHTAR

and RACHEL PREMACK

Daily Staff Reporters

The University’s adminis-

tration exhibited an intriguing
quality in 2013: a large amount
of female representation.

Twenty-five of the 41 top

positions at the University,
including three of the highest
positions — president, provost
and executive vice president for
medical affairs — were held by
women in 2013.

Though President Emerita

Mary Sue Coleman has since
retired and Ora Pescovitz, exec-
utive vice president for medical
affairs, stepped down last year,
women hold about half of the
University’s executive officer
seats.

However, data from the Uni-

versity’s 2014 salary report,
released in December, indicates
that only two women held a spot

on the list of top 10 highest-paid
University executives.

The University’s compen-

sation philosophy specifically
outlines an aim to “(a)ttract,
retain, reward and motivate the
productivity and commitment
of highly qualified, diverse fac-
ulty and staff.” The statement
also promises the University
does not “practice, or tolerate,
unlawful
discrimination
in

pay.”

This piece examines whether

a discrepancy in base salaries
between male and female exec-
utives exists within the Univer-
sity’s administration. Doing so
required extensive data analy-
sis — namely, comparing the
salaries of more than 40 posi-
tions across the University.

These positions include, but

are not limited to, the executive
vice presidents, deans and pro-
vosts. This article also analyzes
the salaries of executives at 11
other top colleges with which
the University competes for
faculty.

Ultimately,
this
article

attempts to determine whether
or not instances of compara-
tively higher salaries for male
executives are anomalies, or if
there is a traceable wage gap
within the University’s leader-

ship. Simply — is the University
adhering to its own philosophy?

Though
salaries
from
a

sample of a dozen peer institu-
tions appear to illustrate wage
discrepancies based on gender,
a Michigan Daily analysis of
compensation for top Univer-
sity officials shows the gap may
not be statistically significant
among University executives.

The Provost: A case study
Perhaps the most notable

salary trend in the University
administration is that of the
provost.

In 2006, Teresa Sullivan

became the University’s pro-
vost after having served as a
vice provost, vice president and
graduate dean for the Univer-
sity of Texas at Austin. She had
also been the executive vice
chancellor for academic affairs
for the entire University of
Texas system.

Sullivan’s base salary at the

University was $340,000. By
the time she stepped down in
2010, it had grown to $366,331.
President
Emerita
Coleman

appointed Philip Hanlon to suc-
ceed Sullivan when she depart-
ed to assume the University of
Virginia presidency in 2010.

Hanlon worked at the Uni-

See CSG, Page 3A
See MONOLOGUES, Page 3A
See GENDER GAP, Page 3A

infographic by Eli Scheinholtz

Rick Snyder: Could he seek the Oval Office in 2016?

The Statement

EVALUATING THE GENDER GAP

Monologues
explore faith,
self-identity

Proposal
asks CSG
to endorse
spirit song

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CAMPUS LIFE

INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 69
©2015 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

SPORTS ......................7A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A

THE STATEMENT..........1B

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