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February 09, 2015 - Image 1

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michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, February 9, 2015

CELEBRATING OUR ONE-HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Michigan fell just short of a road
upset at Indiana, losing 70-67

» INSIDE
Bloomington Bummer

200 students
build consumer

products at second
annual Makeathon

By JING JING MA

Daily Staff Reporter

The Art and Architecture

Building buzzed with energy
Saturday afternoon as students
sketched designs, drilled wood
and wired hardware. More than
200 students tried their hands at
building physical products rang-
ing from collapsible skis to stress-
relieving stones.

Makeathon, held Friday and

Saturday, is an annual competi-
tion where students team up to
brainstorm and create innova-
tive products. Participants com-
peted in one of three categories:
Health & Wellness, Environment
& Energy and Entertainment &
Toys.

MPowered, a student orga-

nization that promotes student
entrepreneurship, launched the

competition in 2013. MPow-
ered is also responsible for simi-
larly focused events, including
MHacks, 1000 Pitches and Start-
up High School.

Last year, the University of

Michigan-Dearborn
hosted

Makeathon, with about 100 par-
ticipants. This year, the event
doubled in size and was held on
North Campus.

Art
&
Design
sophomore

Arwin Wang, Makeathon direc-
tor, said the event’s change in size
yielded a minor change in focus
as well. To give the event a more
defined
purpose,
Makeathan

featured three themes: Health &
Wellness, Environment & Energy
and Entertainment & Toys.

“Last year the event was very

open-ended and people could cre-
ate whatever they wanted,” she
said. “We want people to come
up with innovative ideas and cre-
ative ways to create a product that
solves a real problem.”

Students streamed into the

auditorium of the Art and Archi-
tecture Building for the event’s
closing ceremony Sunday after-

University hosts
discussion with
alumni, state

economic adviser

By IRENE PARK

Daily Staff Reporter

In recent years, colleges across

the nation, including the Univer-
sity, have started offering degrees,
certificates and classes geared
toward
entrepreneurship
and

innovation.
Friday
afternoon’s

#UMichChat Twitter event fea-
tured four panelists who discussed
entrepreneurship in Michigan.

The Twitter talk is the Uni-

versity’s fourth; previous events
featured E. Royster Harper, vice
president for student life, and a dis-
cussion on social media and jour-
nalism.

Kelly LaPierre, managing direc-

tor of Desai Accelerator; Engineer-
ing Prof. Thomas Zurbuchen, the
University’s senior counselor for
entrepreneurship; University alum
Jeffrey Sorensen, co-founder of

U.S Supreme Court
justice talks gender,

prominent cases

By SHOHAM GEVA and

TAYLOR WIZNER

Daily News Editor and

Daily Staff Reporter

U.S. Supreme Court Justice

Ruth Bader Ginsburg spoke
about her life and opinions on
Supreme Court cases at Hill

Auditorium Friday morning as
part of the annual Tanner Lec-
ture.

Speaking to a full auditorium

of over 3,000 students, faculty
and community members, Gins-
burg discussed the issues that
have defined her career, such as
gender and voting equality.

Ginsburg, who was appointed

to the Supreme Court by Presi-
dent Bill Clinton in 1993, has
seen
several
landmark
civil

rights cases during her time on
the Court. These include United

States v. Virginia, which dis-
cussed
whether
state-funded

educational institutions could
refuse to admit women, and Shel-
by v. Holder, which considered
portions of the Voting Rights
Act. During her time as a law-
yer, she litigated multiple major
cases concerning several aspects
of gender discrimination.

Law Prof. Scott Hershovitz

and Assistant Law Prof. Kate
Andrias, who were both former
clerks for Ginsburg, moderated
the Q&A discussion-style event,

using their own questions and
some supplied by the audience
prior to the event.

Andrias began the Q&A, ask-

ing why Ginsburg went into law
when so few women were in the
field.

Ginsburg said she was inspired

by the atmosphere around civil
rights, citing in particular the
Red Scare during the 1950s,
which led to many individuals
being arrested on suspicion of
Communist ideology.

“The idea was that lawyer is

the profession, but it’s also some-
thing that arms you with the skill
to make things a little better for
other people,” she said.

She added that her choice

lay between business and law
school, and her graduate school
of choice, Harvard, had not yet
opened its business school up to
women.

At a time when there was very

little mention of women’s status
in the law, Ginsburg said she sub-
sequently began her legal focus
on gender equality in the 1960s,

while she was teaching at Rut-
gers University and serving as a
volunteer lawyer with the Amer-
ican Civil Liberties Union.

Rather than being self-initiat-

ed, she said both a student push
for a class on gender equality law
and a growing number of com-
plaints to the ACLU concerning
gender equality drew her atten-
tion to the subject.

Her first foray into the area

came when the legal director
from the New Jersey ACLU affil-

Muslim Student

Association dinner
features traditional
cultural elements

By EMMA KILBANE

For the Daily

Celebrating achievement and

faith, the Muslim Student Asso-
ciation hosted their annual ban-

quet Friday night with a menu
of traditional Arab cuisine and
a lineup of speakers and perfor-
mances.

The event, held in the North

Campus
Research
Complex,

drew about 200 alumni, stu-
dents and other guests who
gathered to celebrate MSA
accomplishments during the
past semester.

Many guests wore traditional

clothing in nearly every color of
the spectrum, and crystals often

adorned the hijabs, or heads-
carves attendees wore.

The
MSA,
comprised
of

approximately 250 active mem-
bers, works toward building a
Muslim community on campus
through community service,
social
connections,
religious

enrichment, social justice and
interfaith relations.

The banquet also featured

keynote speaker Amjad Tarsin,
a University alum who is cur-

CAMPUS LIFE
TECHNOLOGY

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily

Ruth Bader
Ginsburg
speaks at

Hill Auditorium

JAMES COLLER/Daily

LSA sophomore Tahany Alsabahi and LSA freshman Noor Abughoush eat at the Muslim Student Association’s
annual banquet Friday at the North Campus Research Complex.

See TWITTER, Page 2A
See BANQUET, PAGE 2A
See MAKEATHON, Page 3A

See RBG, Page 3A

N O T O R I O U S

Program draws
creative minds
to N. Campus

At banquet, Muslim group
celebrates past semester

Twitter chat
focuses on
business and
innovation

INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 62
©2015 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

ARTS...........................5A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

CL ASSIFIEDS...............6A

SPORTS MONDAY.........1B

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