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May 17, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-17

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WEATHEF
AND WARMER
TODAY

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tttt

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SEBICE

r.,._,_._....

VOL. XXVII. No. 161. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 17, 1917. PRICE FIVE C3

"MICHI'GAN'SFIRST
CORPS TO SERVE
IN FRANCE CHOSEN
AMBULANCE UNIT TO SAIL FROM
NEW YORK ON
JUNE 16
25 SIGNED UP FOR
SIX MONTHS' SERVICE
Campaign for Rest of $10,000 to Be
Carried on This
'Week

Michigan's first university unit to
enter the American ambulance field
service in France has been selected.
The following 25 men will comprise
the unit:
F. J. Thieme, 'SE, Ft. Wayne, Ind.;
J. V. Campbell, '18, Ann Arbor; A. R.
Thompson, grad., Rensselaer, Ind.; G.
A. Wilt, Franklin, Pa.; C. 0. Wilson,
'20E, Muskegon; R. W. Starrett, '20E,
Mt. Clair, N. J.; J. E. Chenot, '19L,
Detroit; H. D. Wood, '19, Adrian; G
W. Osgood, '20, Adrian; G. R. Larwill,
'20, Adrian; K. C. Wesely, '17, Adrian;
T. F. McAllister, '18, Grand Rapids;
A. D. Rathbone, '19, Grand Rapids;
T. H. Long, Bryan, 0.; G. W. Lovell,
' 8, Crowly, La.; W. P. Loer, New-
castle, Ind.; H. R Day, '20E, Chicago,
Ill.; H. N. Braad, '19E, Toledo, O.;
L. S. Thompso, '18, Toledo, 0.; E. D.
Slater,,'17, Chicago, Ill.; R. D. Lamond,
'17, Chicago, Ill.; R. W. Phelps, '20E,
Cleveland, Q.; L. J. Bulkey, '17, De-
troit; H. K. Lane, '17L, Ann. Arbor,
and M. F. Smallpage, '18, Eagle Grove,
Ia.
The unit will sail for Bordeaux,
France, from New York City on a
French line steamer June 16, and has
enlisted for six months' service in
France. The unit is independent of
the United States ambulance service
and the Red Cross, and will pay its
own expenses. Of the $10,000 fund
which is being raised for this purpose,
$2,000 has already been 'subscribed.
Grand Rapids alumni of the University
have subscribed $1,000 and Ann Ar-
bor $400. The campaign for the rest
of the $10,000 will start in Detroit and
other cities before the end of the
week.
Sixty men have applied on a separate
list for service in a Michigan ambu-
lance unit, and it is highly probable
that some of these men will be formed
into another division to sail for France
some time in July.
hOUSE AND SENATE CONFEREES
AGREE ON PAY INCREASE
Washington, May 16.-The house
and senate conferees reached their
third agreement late today when the
senate yielded to the house demand for
increased pay for soldiers. The bill
once more goes back to the house
and the senate for final approval.
The measure now increases the pay
of all men enlisted during the war
$15 a month over pay in peace time.
The increase applies also to enlisted
men of the national guard called or
drafted into federal service.
Dr. D. D. Van Slyke Speaks Tonight
Dr. D. D. Van Slyke of the Rockefel-
ler institute for medical research, will
lecture on "Certain Phases of Protein
Chemistry," at 8 o'clock tonight in the
Chemistry building amphitheater. Th
-lecture is under the auspices of the
University of Michigan section of the
American Chemical society. The pub-
lis is invited.
Loan to Russia Livens Markets
New York, May 16.-The announce-
ment that the government had loaned
Russia $10,000,000 caused a rush of
buying orders in the stock market this
afternoon. The action was inferred
to mean that fear of Russia's deflec-
tion had been dispelled.
Dr. C. C. Huber Speaks in Minneapolis
Minneapolis, Minn., May 16.-Dr. C.
Carl Huber of the University of Michi-
gan delivered the annual address be-
fore Alpha Omega Alpha, honorary
medical fraternity, Friday evening. Dr.
Huber's subject was "The Embrology

Cosmopolitan Club
ianquets Tonight
Speeches, toasts, and music will
constitute the program of the Cosmo-
politan club's annual banquet, which
is to be held at 6:30 o'clock this even-
ing in the Congregational church.
Dr. J. E. Conner, former United
States council at Petrograd, will be
the principal speaker.
President Harry B. Hutchins, Prof.
R. M. Wenley, Prof. H. E. Riggs, Anna
M. Lloyd, '18, and H. G. King, '18, will
speak. Carlos A. Zanelli, '17E, will
render a vocal selection.
Tickets may be obtained at the door.
Proving Herein
Three 's a Croivd
Sophs, Fresh, and Sorority Don't Mix
Well; Police Add to
Evening
Freshmen, sophomores, and soror-
ities as a group never did mix. They
don't today. And they didn't last
night.
The Freshman Glee club had reached
a newly erected sorority house in its
anneal serenading tour last evening.
The second year class was out in force
after the 1920 pep gathering.
The fresh pot hunters neared the
South University corner. Gallant
warblers were warbling at the house,
situat d on Washtenaw avenue. The
sorol ity was entertaining.
Fully 150 sophs took a sudden lik-
ing to the sight and broke ranks. Fif-
teen freshmen retreated not according
to military science as temporary
guests of the sorority.
Student councilmen, rushed to the
rescue, but proved ineffective as peace-
makers. Police were called.
Guardians of the city's peace en&'ed
the evening formally and otherwise
by conducting the tenors and basses
through the lines in automobiles.
M;mbrs of the sorority are allow-
ing the dust to accumulate as thickly
as it cares to on the "welcome" mat
this morning. This same dust, in-
creased ,with the passage of time, will
probably be undisturbed for some days.
DRUIDS INITIATE
NINE JUNIOR LITS

YEARINGS HOLD
SPIRITED MEETING
Rules of Spring Games Explained to
Freshmen; Pushball Battle
Postponed
MORE SOPHOMORES NEEDED
FOR TUG-OF-WAR BATTLE
Second Year Men to Assemble To-
night; Carroll, Mack, and Ses-
sions to Speak
The men of 1920, though few in
number, last night furnished one of
the most spirited pep sessions in re-
cent years.
Meeting in the west physics hall the
freshmen heard the rules for the
spring contests explained and learned
how different contests were conducted
in past years. Responding with great
enthusiasm to the talks of R. W. Col-
lins, '17E, and James Schermerhorn
Jr., '18, the first year men made the
hall resound with their cheers. Grant
Cook, '17L, was in charge of the meet-
ing. H. A. Taylor, '17E, explained the
rules for the contests. The Freshmen
Glee club was on hand and. sang for
their classmates.
When the affair was over the fresh-
men formed in columns of four and
marched through University hall over
to State street and from there down
town. Here a battle of eggs was
waged with some unknown forces and
the yearlings retired to State street
where they vied with a crowd of sopho-
mores in yelling.
The time for the pushball contest
and relay races has been changed to
Saturday afternoon. The classes will
meet on the campus at 2 o'clock.
Unless more freshmen and sopho-
mores try out for the relays and more
sophomores weigh-in for the tug-of-
war these contests will have to be
called off this year, according to a,
statement made 'by H. A. Taylor, '17E,.
in charge of the spring games, last
night. Final try-outs for the relays
will be held from 1 to 5:30 o'clock;
today in Waterman gymnasium. Final
weighing in for tug-of-war will be from
1 to 3 o'clock this afternoon in Water-
man gymnasium.
Both classes will meet on the cam-
pus at 3:40 o'clock Friday afternoon.
All contestants in the tug-of-war must
wear tennis shoes, and gloves are ad-
visable. No digging o holes for brac-
ing will'be allowed in this contest.
The sophomores will hold a pep
meeting at 7 o'clock tonight in the
west physics hall. The speakers will
be H. L. Carroll, '17E, E. E. Mack, '17E,9
and D. W. Sessions, '17L.4
The names of the contestants in allj
of the games will be printed in The
Daily tomorrow morning.
UNIQUE STUNTS AT JAMBOREE;
FLANNELS A PREREQUISITE

ANNOUNCEMENTS CONCERNING SPRING
GAMES BY DEANS AND COUNCILMEN
On account of the freshman-sophomore tug-of-war contests to be
held Friday afternoon, May 18 freshmen and sophomores in the Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the Arts and in the College of En-
gineering may be excused in advance by their instructors from the
3 and 4 o'clock classes on that date.
JOHN R. EFFINGER,
M. E. .COOLEY.
Sophomores will meet at 7 o'clock tonight on West Physics hall
for pep meeting. Thirty sophomores are needed for relays and 35
for tug-of-war. Final tryouts for relays from 1 to 5:30 o'clock today
in Waterman gymnasium and final weighing in for tug-of-war from 1
to 3 o'clock at same place.

Financial Aid Given to
Government and Aid
of Alles

Bolster U
Cause

RUSSiA TO 'SPEND
IN UNTE TA TI
NEW REPUBLIC TO SPEND MON
UNDER SUPERVISION OF
TREASURY
WILL SCORN OFFERS
OF SEPARATE PEA(

FARM LABORER TAKES
OWN LIFE AT YM.D.A
HAROLD HADDOCK OF HAMBURG,
MICH., FOUND DEAD YES-
TERDAY MORNING
Harold Haddock, '18 years old, of
Hamburg, Mich., took his own life
early yesterday morning at the city
Y. M. C. A. by firing a 32-caliber bul-
let through his right temple. He was
found in his room at 4 o'clock yes-
terday afternoon. He left no papers
or message which might lead to a
clue.
Haddock came to the Y. M. C. A.
two months ago in quest of employ-
ment, and it is believed that since
that time he has been engaged on the
Underdown farms on the Huron river.
Tuesday he returned to the Y. M. C.
A., renting a room for the use of the
night. No one saw him after he left
for his room.
Haddock was found siting in a
rocking chair, his right hand holding
a 32-caliber hammerless revolver, and
his left hand gripping the arm of the
chair tightly. The bullet entered a
little above the right temple, com-
ing out near the top of the head. It
is believed he comnfitted the act early
in the morning, for the ropmers who
were about late in the night did not
hear the report of the revolver.
The body was taken to the Dieterle
undertaking rooms where the coroner's
inquest was held. Two letters in Mr.
Haddock's pocket from his brother in
Howell did not throw any light on his
identity. A considerable sum of mon-
ey on the victim indicated that the
fatal attempt on life was not due to
financial difficulties. His suitcase con-
tained nothing besides a box of cart-
ridges.
The parents will come to Ann Ar-
bor for the body this morning.

COUNTER-OFFENSIVES
OF GERANSWEAKEN
BRITIS H TAKE INITIATIVE;
HEAVY FIGHTING CONTINUES
ON FRONTS
London, May 16.-Germany's counter
offensive attack which started yes-
terday with repeated attempts against
French and British fronts has appar-
ently worn itself out today in vain
beating against the allies' positions.
The British in turn took the initia-
tive and progressed around Bullecourt
and north of the river. Heavy fight-
ing continues.
On the French front the official
statement indicated that the enemy
counter offensive was consigned to a
single major action around Lassaux,
which was repelled by the French.
The Berlin statement on the other
hand, claims capture of a -section of
French trenches east of Lanszille.
ITALIANS ADVANCE
Forces Gain Steadily Over Front of
30 Miles
TDome, May 16.-Italy's great of-
fensive is gaining ground. Over a
front of nearly 30 miles the Italian
guns are roaring, while the infantry
is steadily advancing. Official state-
ment today indicated that the Aus-
trians are resisting the Italian ad-
vance, the fighting becoming more in-
tense. "I have seen a new world, a
new war, and a new Italy," declared
Rudyard Kipling, who came from the
front today. He said that the heavy
artillery was particularly effective
against the enemy.
F. F. McKINNEY, '16L, VISITS
ANN ARBOR ON FURLOUGH
F. F. McKinney, '16L, managing ed-
tor of The-Daily last year, was in Ann
Arbor yesterday.
After holding the position of city ed-
itor on the Poughkeepsie Evening En-
terprise for a year he joined the navy

Washington, May 16.-Every ceni
the, $100,000,000 loaned today to R
sia by the United States must be sp
in this country, it was learned tod
Russia agreed to this conditiona
to the provision that the money mi
be spent under the supervision of
treasury department.
The United States was further
sured that if the hundred million d
lar loan were made Russia's contin
tion in the war on the side of the all
would be certain and that the 14
was made contingent on her reject
all German offers of a separate pea
Today's loan marks_ the formalc
try ofRussia as a participant in
$3,000,000,000 credit to be placed
the disposal of the allies. While R
sia's request for a loan had been
fore treasury officials for some tin
there was little indication that a 14
would be granted so soon. Signing
the loan brings the total of Americ
war loans to allies up to $625,000,(
The Root mission, now ready to
part for Petrograd, will have much
say in the spending of the Americ
loan to the Russian government.
large part of the money will undou
edly be spent for railroad supplies
the United States.
It is the general opinion also tb
the-decided unrest in Russia at pr
ent was partly influential in causi
the sudden decision to lend immedi
financial aid in an attempt to bols
up the provisional government.
U. S. WARSHIPS IN
EUROPE AN WATER

Senior Lit Honorary Society
A nnual Spring
Election

Holds

First American Vessels
Territory to
Allies

Arrive in
Aid

Nine junior lits were shown into
the mysteries of the Druids, senior lit
honorary organization, last night
around the Druid rock. The aw-
enydds are as follows : C. C. An-
drews. Allen Shoenfield, B. A.
Swaney, C. W. Neumann, James
Schermerhorn Jr., C. F. Boos, J. B.
Reid, R. C. Patterson, and C. P. Emery.
A banquet at the Union followed
the initiation ceremonies. Conrad
Church acted as toastmastr, calling
for speeches frointhe following; W.
A. Niemann, '17, Prof. Arthur R. Cross,
Allen Shoenfield, '18, and Dean John.
R. Effinger.
URGES RECONSIDERATION OF
GERMANY'S PEACE PROPOSAL
London, May 16.-Impassioned plea
that England reconsider the terms of
the January note rejecting Germany's
peace offer was made in the house of
commons today by Phillip Snowden,
radical socialist and peace advocate.
He declared that "one country of the
entente was now on the verge of revo-
lution," and that socialists of all
belligerent nations are unanimously
for peace along lines of policy urged
by the new Russian regime.
Snowden asserted that President
Wilson had not joined the compact of"
allies because of the January note.
Lord Robert Cecil, acting foreign min-
ister in the absence of R. J. Balfour,
interrupted at this juncture to declare
that the question of America entering
formally into alliance with England
had never been raised.
E. R. Sylvester Injured in New York
E. R. Sylvester, a former Michigan
student, now studying law at Colum-
bia university, was struck by a sub-
way train in New York recently and
painfully injured. According to reports
received here he has- been taken to a

Several semi-military features will
be introduced at the Junior Jamboree,'
according to the committeemen
in charge of the affair, although they
refused to reveal their exact nature.
American flags will be a predominat-
ing feature in the decorations, and
patriotic airs will figure largely in
the program of dances.j
As announced, flannels and spring
apparel will be a prerequisite to par-
ticipation in the revelry, the party be-
ing the formal introduction of the jun-
ior class into seniordom. Tickets,
selling at $1.50 will go on sale at the
Union tomorrow at 2 o'clock.
SENATE ATTACKS NATIONAL
DEFENSE COUNCIL POWERS
Washington, May 16.-Attacks on the
council of national' defense and the
administration program of giving .dic-
tatorial powers to that body featured
a long debate by the senate today.
Although the bill under discussion
was the urgent deficiency bill, the
discussion took a wide range. It de-
veloped considerable opposition to fix-
ing powers during the war, and to un-
limited government control. Much of
the opposition to the national defense
council was fired from the Democratic
side.
Prof. R. W. Hegner to Speak Tonight
Prof. R. W. Hegner will describe the
methods of photograping with an illus-
trated lecture at a meeting of the Bird
club at 7:30 o'clock tonight in room
355 of the Natural Science building.

RESERVES PAID

OFF

To Drill in Whaleboat on River in the
Future

Sixty naval reserves lined up in as a yoeman. At present he is on a
front of Waterman gymnasium yester- 10 days' furlough after which he. ex-
pects to be assigned to duty on a bat-
day afternoon to draw their first gov- tue ship.a
ernment pay. They received $15 apiece,
the emolument for six weeks pay for SOUTH AMERICAN CLUB MEETS;
quarters, which was paid at the rate TO BANQUET ON MAY 25
of $2.50 per week.
This. sum, which amounts to $2.460, R. E. Merino, '17E, and L. J. Guer-
was secured from the appropriation rero, '19E, were the principal speak-
given by the state to the navy for next ers at a meeting of the South Ameri-
year and granted through the efforts can union Tuesday night. A banquet

London, May 16.-An American toi
pedo boat destroyer floatilla is no'
"at the front" in the waters, the Bri'
ish officials announced today. T:
United States destroyer flotilla has ax
rived to co-operate with our navi
forces, the statement declared.
.Rear Admiral -Simms, U. S. N., wi
command all American naval force
in the waters. The American destroy
ers arrived at Queenstown yesterday
"The service the United States ves
sels are rendering the allies is c
greatest value and is deeply apprec
ated," was the statement of a pron
inent British official.
Government Confirms Statement
Washington, May 16.-Confirmatic
of British admirals' statement, tellin
of the arrival of American warships i
Europe,- was given here officially th:
afternoon. The vessels sent abroa
are destroyers which will co-operal
with the allies in naval work. Th
names of members of the destroyei
are withheld. The vessels are th
first American ships to take active pai
in the war.
DR. RITTE, SWISS MINISTER,
TRANSFERRED TO THE HAGU
Washington, May 16.-Dr. Paul Rit
ter, Swiss minister to the Unite
States, announced his tranfer to Th
Hague today. He will leave for hi
new post as soon as his successor, a
yet unnamed, arrives, presumably i
June.
Marked displeasure was evidence
by the United States governemnt ove
some of Ritter's propaganda work fo
Germany, instituted immediately afte
Ambassador Bernstorff left, and
was considered likely today that th
Swiss government had taken cogni:
ance of this fact in transferring hin

of Regent J. E. Beal, Prof. J. R. Allen,
and Lieut. J. R. Hayden.
The naval reserves have a whaleboat
on the river, and rowing practice will
start at once. The boat, which came
from Saginaw, was sent to Ann Ar-
bor after the removal of the division
from that city.
EDITORIAL CONTEST DECISION
TO BE ANNOUNCED NEXT WEEK
Announcement of the winning ed-
itorial of the contest conducted by Pi
Delta Epsilon, upperclass honorary
journalistic fraternity, will be made
on Tuesday of next week.
The manuscripts submitted will be
judged by Professors J. Raleigh Nel-
son, M. P. Tilley, and Mr. Lyman L.
Bryson of the rhetoric .department.
The winning editorial will receive'
a prize of $10.

will be given for the members of the
union on May 25, celebrating the an-
niversary of the Argentine republic.
The last meeting of the organiza-
tion will be held June 1.
FRENCH CONVERSATION CLASS
ENROLLMENT EXCEEDS LIMIT
Professor Moritz Levi will not ac-
cept any more applications for en-
rollment in his conversational French
class. There are 30 members in the
class at present and this number is
as large a number as can be handled
acceptably.
To Hold First Senior Sing Friday
The first senior sing .of the year
will be held at 7 o'clock Friday night
at the campus band stand. All seniors
should appear in caps and gowns. The
band will be present.

1 hospital and is recovering rapidly.

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