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May 16, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-16

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

.

Ar Sir

4:7lattg
;

UNITED PRES

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 160. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT

FRESHMEN GATHER
TONIGHT TO MAKE
READY FOR GAMES
SPEAKERS TO INSTILL PEP IN
YEARLINGS AT
MEETING
CONTESTS WILL BEGIN
ON FRIDAY AFTERNOON
Tug-of-War Comes First, Pushball and
Relays on Saturday
Morning
* * * * * * * * * * * * * *

* Pep meeting for all freshmen
* will be held at 7 o'clock tonight in
* the west physics lecture room.
* Prominent campus men will ex-
* plain rules of contests to first year
men.
* Weighing for the three tug-of-
* war teams and tryouts for the re-
* lay men will be continued from
* 1 to 3 o'clock today in Waterman
* gymnasium. More men must turn
* out. Only a few sophomores re-
* ported yesterday.
* * * *. * * * * * * * * *
All freshmen will convene at

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
7

o'clock tonight in the west physics
lecture room for the annual pep meet-
ing in preparation for the spring con-
tests. Grant Cook, '17L, James
Schermerhorn Jr., '18, and R. W. Col-
lins, '17E, will be on hand to instill
the fighting spirit into the first year
men.
The sophomores will meet at the
same time and place tomorrow night.
The rules of the games will be ex-:
plained at these meetings. The Stu-
dent council requests every male stu-
dent in the two underclasses to be
present,
Tug-of-War Held Friday Afternoon
The tug-of-war will be held at 4
o'clock Friday afternoon across the
Huron river. The freshmen will meet
at 3:15 o'clock at the flag- pole while
the sophomores will convene at the
same hour at Waterman gymnasium.
The two classes will proceed to the
river at 3:30 o'clock.-
To aid in awarding the decision for
the tug-of-war contests, a float will be
placed in mid-stream. After a 20-
minute pull the decision will be given
to the side which has pulled the flag
on the middle of the big rope near-
est to its own side of the river. Every
effort will be made to prevent any
help for either side by the spectators.
The instant a contestant loosens his
hold'of the rope he will be disqualified
from further participation. The ref-
eree for the tug-of-war will be C. F.
Cross, '17.
Pushball Starts on Ground
Starting the ball on the ground will
be the only change, in the rules for
the pushball contest to be held at 10
o'clock Saturday morning. The fresh-
men and sophomores will meet at 9:15
o'clock at the flag pole and gymnas-
ium, respectively. They will march
to Ferry field at 9:30 o'clock.
In order to eliminate as far as pos-
sible any danger of personal injury,
flying squadrons will be prohibited.
The affair will be divided into four
quarters of five minutes each, with a
five-minute intermission intervening
between each quarter. The pushball
referee will be H. L. Caroll, '17E.
Relay Races Saturday Morning
The three relay races will also be
run Saturday morning at Ferry field.
They are to be obstacle races, each
man having to clear an eight-foot
fence and dive through a barrel. All
contestants must wear tennis shoes.
Elmer Brandell, '17, will referee the
relays.

'AWENYDDS"AWAIT
DRUID INITIATION
Senior Literary Honorary Society
Takes Nine Juniors Into
Fold Today
Grouped around the Druid rock in
front of the Museum this afternoon,
nine members of the junior literary
class will silently await the coming of
the hour when the mysteries of the
senior literary honorary society shall
be revealed unto them.
The hour is late afternoon or early
evening-the place is the ancient
Druid rock-the men are the "aweny-
dds" (which is Druid for "initiate").
A banquet will be held at the Union
later in the evening, and a program
of faculty speakers has been arranged.
PRESENT SHAKESPEAREAN
PLAY ONFR/DAY NIGHT
DRAMA TO BE GIVEN IN FULL
COSTUME FOR SECOND
TIME IN HISTORY
For the second time in the history
of the University, a Shakespearean
play will be presented in full costume,
when "The Merry Wives of Windsor"
will be given in University Hall at 8
o'clock Friday night, May 18, under
the auspices of the Oratorical associa-
tion.
The entire proceeds of the play will
be turned over to the local ambulance
unit to aid them in their campaign
of raising sufficient money with which
to equip an ambulance corp to send
to the firing lines of France.
An all-star cast, under the direc-
tion of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister and
Mr. Louis Eich of the oratory depart-
ment, will appear in the production.
The part of the genial Falstaff will be
taken by Mark Bailey, grad., a man
who is eminently qualified in several
ways to handle the role of Shake-
speare's brilliant fool. George Wil-
ner, grad., takes the part of Slender,
and the other lead roles are played by
Claude D. Swift, '18, Effen Van Scoten,
grad., Miriam Toles, '17, Laura Shaw,
grad., M. F. Peters, '17, and Howard E.
Haag, grad. The other members of
the cast are: Charles Layton, grad.,
George W. Hulbert, '17, C. E. Bailey,
'17, Paul E. Brown, '17, Jacob E. Stern,
'17, Helen Davis, '17, Clifford G.
Gracey, '17, Lena M. Sackett, '18, Paul
E. Brown, '17, Arthur E. Cook, '17, and
R. Clarence Hunter, '17. Practically
every member of the cast has had
former experience in University
dramatics, appearing in "The Magic
Carpet," "The Pillars of Society," and
"Les Pattes des Mouches."
The costumes and properties have
been specially made for the produc-
tion. Tickets are on sale at Wahr's.
TO GIVE TEA IN NEWBERRY
HALL FRIDAY AFTERNOON
Mu Phi Epsilon sorority, assisted by
the Sinfonia fraternity, will give a
musical tea from 3 to 6 o'clock Friday
afternoon, May 18, in Newberry hall,
for the benefit of thetRed.Cross. A
silver offering 'will be taken.
Aristolochite Society Holds Meeting
The Aristolochite society held a
meeting last evening at the Catalpa
Inn for their seven new members.
Donald Cross, '17P, spoke to the so-

ciety on "The Pharmacists of Our
Army and Navy," and Harold A. Os-
borne, '18P, on "Abstracts .from the
American Chemical Association."
Senate Passes Bill Increasing Navy
Washington, May 15.-The senate
today passed a bill authorizing an in-
crease in the navy from 8,700 to 15,-
000 men, and an increase in the ma-
rine corps from 17,000 to 30,000 men.

GERMANY S1INT
ON PEACE TERMS
Von Bethman-llollweg Refuses to Dis-
cuss War Aims in Reichstag
Assembly
PERCEIVES NO READINESS
OF ALLIES TO MAKE PEACE
Believes Announcement of Teuton
Plans Would Not Serve Best
Interests of Country
London, May 15;-Imperial Chan-
cellor von Bethman-Hollweg refused
to discuss Germany's war aims in the
Reichstag today, according to a wire-
less message from Berlin late this aft-
ernoon.
The chancellor refused to .answer
questions regarding Germany's peace
aspirations, declaring such a statement
would not serve the best interests of
Germany. The chancellor explained,
in answer to the various questions,
that he had outlined the government's
attitude in the offer for peace made
by the central powers on Dec. 12, 1916,
and had reitterated this outline since
then.
Protests Against Discussion
"The government cannot discuss its
war aims and I protest against any
attempt to draw conclusions from this
fact by suggestions of difference of op-
inion among the central powers on the
peace question," the chancellor said:
"This belongs to the realm of imag-
ination. If the situation as it is now
forces silence, then I am silent. I will
not swerve from this path despite
pressure. I am unable to perceive any
invitation on the part of our western
enemies of readiness for peace, or ag-
itation of their extravagant will for
conquest and economic annihilation."
GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE
AVOID DIRECT TRADE 'RULE'
New York, May 15.-Contrary to the
common understanding in the United
States, there' has been little direct
management of business by the gov-
ernments of Great Britain and France
in those countries since the war be-
gan, according to a report on "the re-
lation of the government to war in-
dustry," made to the national civic
federation by Jeremiah W. Jenks, and
given out here tonight.
There has been, however, Professor
Jenks explains, a "rather strict regu-
lation" of industries producing or han-
dling war supplies, but virtually no
direct management of business outside
the regular government arsenals and
certain special factories, few in num-
ber, built by or for the government.
WASHINGTON PUTS CHECK ON
STUDENTS LEAVING FOR FARMS
ceattle, Wash., May 15.-No more
permits allowing students to withdraw
for farm work will be granted at the
University of Washington except in
cases where documentary evidence of
the necessity of the student's pres-
ence on the farm is presented with
his application.
This decision was the result of an
investigation which proved that a
number of students had not gone to
work as they withdrew to do and that
a larger number were taking this priv-
ilege as an easy means of obtaining
credit for the semester's work. More
than 700 students have withdrawn

from the university for tie various
branches of service to the country.
Utah Women Enter 'Domestic Service'
Salt Lake City, May 15.-Since the
announcement that credit would be
given to students withdrawing for
service to the country, 37 women have
left school for work in the kitchen
and on the farm. Most of them an-
nounced their destination as "domestic
service."

HOLD FINALS NEXT WEEK
CONNECTION WITH STATE
BOARD EXAMS

IN

Seniors of the dental college having
no physical defects, or dependents, will
be expected to enlist into the army
dental corps by June 15.
The final examinations for seniors
will be given next week in the col-
lege in connection with the exatnina-
tions of the state board of dental ex-
aminers. The examinations are given
early in order that the seniors might
become qualified dentists at once, and
thus increase the number of dentists
available for government service.
At a meeting last week, the deans of
various dental colleges were told by
the surgeon-general that at least 1000
dentists would be required for the new-
ly recruited army, and that each dental
college would have to contribute men
from their senior classes qualified for
service.
The graduates of the dental colleges
turned out this year will be drafted
first because they will have been trained
in the newest phases of dentistry, and
also will have had courses in war
dental surgery.
Such a course is now being pre-
pared by the faculty of the dental col-
lege, and will be given from May 28 to
June 9, without fee. It will be open to
the seniors and to dental practitioners
who contemplate war service.
The dental clinic will be open as
usual until further notice.
ADELPHI ELECTS OFFICERS FOR
FIRST SEMESTER OF NEXT YEAR
Officers for the first semester of
next year were elected by Adelphi
house of representatives at its meet-
ing last night. Howard D. Moses, '18,
was chosen speaker; Joseph W.
Planck, '18, clerk; Albert E. Sawyer,
'20, assistant clerk; W. E. Grainger,
'19, sergeant-at-arms, and Herman
Agushavitz, '19, oratorical delegate.
The last named officer will serve for
the entire year.
CHANGE TIME OF MEETING OF
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH CLASS
The time and place of meeting of
the class in 'conversational French
which Prof. Moritz Levi is starting
has been changed to 7 o'clock Monday,
Tuesday, and Thursday evenings in
room 201 University hall. This class
was formerly announced to meet at 8
o'clock in room 200 south wing.
KING GEORGE INSPECTS U. 'S.
ARMED PASSENGER VESSELS
Liverpool, England, May 15.-King
George visited American armed pas-
senger ships today and took the live-
liest interest in the mechanism of the
American guns. Lieutenant Hazzard,
U. S. N., in charge of one gun crew,
explained the guns, and the king chat-
tered with him at length.

NOTABLE RUSSIAN
GENERALS RESIGN
Mfay MIean Withdrawal of One of Most
Talented Military Com-
manders
Petrograd, May 15-Generals Brus-
iloss and Courks tendered their resig-
nations today. They have not yet been
accepted.
Brusiloss has been generally regard-
ed as the most notable of all the Russ-
ian generals. - He was in command of
Russia's most successful offensive by
which the Austrians were driven from
Premys1.
Brusiloss' resignation may be con-
sidered exceedingly serious and as in-
dicating the withdrawal from the army
of one of its most talented command-
ers.
SENO DENTS TO BE
ENLISTED FOR SERVICE

U. S PREPIRES TO ARM
FORCE Of MILLION MEN
MUNITIONS BOARD CONTRADICTS
POPULAR IDEA THAT SUP-
PLIES ARE LACKING
Washington, May 15.-"Rifles and7
ammunition for a United States army
of a million men are ready today," was
the statement given out after a meet-
ing of the general munitions board of
the council of national defense today.
Shrank A. Scott, chairman of the
board, issued this statement in which
he dispersed any feeling that the
United States is unprepared to arm
its troops.
A new type of light artillery, said
to be far superior to the "famous
fifty-five" has been adopted for serv-
ice. Munitions plants have made
preparations for manufacture in huge
quantities of several type of artillery.
Several guns of foreign type will be1
introduced in service. They are to be
manufactured in the United States.
"FOOLS' PARADISE"
WORKERS BANQUET
Lyman Bryson Outlines Requirements1
of Operas; Prof. W. A. Frayer
Responds to Toast1
Cast, chorus, committeemen, andr
orchestra of "Fools' Paradise" gath-
ered for the final time, last night at
the Union for the annual banquet given1
by the Union in honor of the opera.
E. E. Pardee, '17, author of this
year's opera, acted as toastmaster,;
calling upon Glenn Coulter, '18L, for
the first toast. Lyman L. Bryson ofi
the rhetoric faculty who was a mem-
ber of the committee choosing the1
book, briefly outlined'the requirements1
of an opera, stating that the book
must be truly Michigan in character,
but not necessarily laid around Ann1
Arbor or containing characters in at-
tendance at Michigan. Prof. W. A.
Frayer, who was faculty chaperon on
the spring trip, responded for the third
toast, giving some interesting remini-
scences of the tour.1
A meeting of the Mimes will be held
at the Tuesday noon luncheon at the'
Union at which time officers will be1
elected for next year. All members
are urged to attend.
YOUNG KNOX GETS DIVORCE
ON GROUND OF DESERTION'
Reno, Nev., May 15.-Philander C.
Knox Jr., son of former Secretary of
State Knox, was granted a divorce to-
day by District Judge Thomas F.
Moren on the ground of desertion. Mrs.:
Knox did not contest the suit, having
withdrawn her opposition after a set-
tlement out of court.
The couple were married at Bur-.
lington, Vt., March 6,d1910, after an.
elopement. Knox said his wife de-
serted him at Charleston, W. Va., Jan.
7, 1915. He declared Mrs. Knox is
now on the stage in New York.
DEMANDS PRICE CONTROL
OVER NEWS PRINT PAPER
Washington, May 15.-News print
paper would be declared a public util-
ity and the federal trade commission
would be authorized to fix its maxi-
mum price by a bill introduced today
by Senator Robinson of Arkansas.

"Unless some relief is obtained thou-
sands of publishers will be driven out
of business," said he.
King Gustave Undergoes Operation
Copenhagen, via London, May 15.-
King Gustave of Swoden underwent an
operation today, according to advices
from Stockholm. The operation was
of a minor nature, but the king will be
confined to his bed for a few days.

UNVRIYLOSES
686 MEN ENTERING
NATIONAL SERICE,
THIS NUMBER LEAVES FROM TWO
DEPARTMENTS
ALONE
MEMBERS OF FACULTY
RESPONDING TO CALL
Engineering Department Suffers
Greatest Loss; Four with
Naval Reserves
Six hundred and sixty-six men of the
literary and engineering colleges, ac-
cording to actual figures compiled yes-
terday, have withdrawn from the Uni-
versity for military service and farm
work, 162 leaving the engineering de-
partment and 504 the literary college.
Of the literary students who have
withdrawn, 260 have started farm
work, and 244 are entered in some
branch of the nation's military serv-
ice. Of the engineering students, 13
are working on farms, 76 are in the
naval reserve companies organized In
the University, 22 are entered in the
training camps, six are in the ambu-
lance corps, 15 are in actual service
in branches other than those men-
tioned, 28 are n constructive work,
one is in a munition plant, and one Is
working in the Tungsten mines.
Figures Compiled Are Not Complete
These figures do not represent all of
the students who have left school.
Many have enlisted who as yet have
not notified the deans of their depart-
ments that they have withdrawn, and
when all the names are in, the total
is expected to go above the 700 mark.
The fraternities have been hit hard
by enlistments. Several of the houses
have been forced to close down or
abandon their boarding table because
of a scarcity of men. Fifty per cent
is quite an average loss for the fra-
ternities and house clubs, while sv-
eral have less than a quarter of their
men left in the University.
Law School Loss Not Yet Estimated
The loss to the Law school has not
been figured definitely as yet, Dean
Henry M. Bates having decided to
wait for a few days until all who were
planning on leaving had given notice
to the secretary. It is thought that
50 at least have left from this school.
Faculty Loses Men by Enlistment
The faculty also has suffered by
enlistments. Prof. Alfred H. White
of the chemical engineering depart-
ment'has gone to Washington to work
on the organization board for inspec-
tion of munitions; Prof. Alfred H.
Lovell of the electrical engineering
department has entered Fort Sheri-
dan; Prof. Peter Field of the mathe-
matics department is with the field
artillery; Prof. Harry S. Sheppard of
the engineering department is a first
lieutenant in the signal corps; Dr.
Rufus S. Tucker of the economics de-
partment has entered Fort Sheridan;
Mr. O. M. McNeil, Dr. J R. Hayden,
Mr. E. A. Harrington, and Prof. A. E.
Boak are with the naval reserves.
Of these members of the faculty
who have enlisted Professors White,
Lovell, and Field are married. Stu-
dents and faculty ofthe chemical en-
gineering department presented Prof.
Alfred H. White with a gold watch
and chain before he left.
URGENT DEFICIENCY BILL
INTRODUCED IN CONGRESS

Washington, May 15.-Carrying an
appropriation of $3,390,000,000, the
urgent deficiency bill was reported out
of the senate appropriations commit-
tee this afternoon. It is the largest
appropriation bill of its kind ever in-
troduced in congress. The bill places
in the hands of President Wilson
drastic powers for coping with the
shipping problem.

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