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October 17, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-17

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THE WEATHER
ANN ARBOR-
SHOWERS AND
COOLER

GAN

UNITED PRESS WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

L. XXVIL No. 13. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS
_________________________________________I.

GERMAN COUNTER
TTACKSHURLED
BACK IN, GAICIA
HE A VY FIGHTING CONTINUES
ALONG RUSSIAN-TEUTON
FRONT
ROUMANIANS AGAIN ADVANCE
Berlin Reports Severe Defeat of En-
emy in Enveloping Movement
in Alt Valley
Petrograd, Oct. 16.-The Teutons
have launched repeated counter at-
tacks in the great battle now raging
north of Korytuica but have been re-
pelled with heavy losses. Heavy fight-
ing is occurring along the wide porti-
tions of both the Voihynian and Gal-
cican fronts. Obstinate battles con-
tinue north of Zborow and north of
Stanislau where a Teutonic attempted
advance was driven back by Russian
fire. In the Carpathians the enemy
attacked fiercely in the region of
Korosniezo and near Karilbaba
but were repulsed, the Russians
taking 1,171 prisoners. South of
Dorna Vatra near the Roumanian front
here the enemy took the offensive with
large forces.
Roumanian Army in Fragments,
Berlin, via wireless to Sayville, Oct.
16.-Only pitiful fraguients of Rou-
mania's army that invaded southeast-
ern Transylvania escaped to hiding
places in the mountains, said the mili-
tary critic of the semi-official' news
agency in a review of the Roumanian
operations today. The Iirst Roumanian
army and a lager part of the second
were practically annihilated in the bat-
tles around Hermannstadt. Near
Kronstadt the second Roumanian army
lost nearly two divisions in retreating
from an Austro-German enveloping
movement on both sides of the Alt
valley.
New Advance in Alt Valley.
Bucharest, Oct. 16. - Roumanian
troops have occupied the villages of
Stanagligoman Giocado Bronului and
Cioicastri Catului in their new counter
offensive against the Teutons in the
Alt valley region.
Allies Loose Heavily on Somme.
Berlin, via wireless to Sayville, Oct.
16.-The great allied attack north of
the Somme beginning last Friday is
believed to have been an attempt on
a grand scale to break through the
German lines, said a semi-official
statement today. Prisoners report
that the allied losses, especially those
of the English, were greater than in
any previous attack on this front.
EXPECT BIG APPROPRIATION
Naval Department May Cost $380,000,-
000 or More This Year.
Washington, Oct. 16.-Naval ap-
propriations are likely to break rec-
ords again at the coming session of
congress. This became known today
in connection with the announcement
that the house naval committee, fore-
seeing a vast amount of work ahead,
will meet November 2, to begin con-
sideration of the naval bill.
In naval circles it was predicted
the appropriations, unless the "little
navy" members slaughter the bill, will
mount up to $330,000,000 or more.
The navy department is now working
on the estimate. The bill of last ses-
slo4 carried $313,000,000.

"Y" MEN MEET AT ALBION
Frank Olmstead, Michigan Man, Elect-
ed Secretary
Representatives from all the Y. M.
C. A.'s of the state are holding a con-
vention at Albion, this week Friday,
Saturday and Sunday. Frank Olm-
stead, '17, member of the University
"Y" has been elected state student
secretary of the association.
Prominent speakers on the program
are Bishop Henderson of Detroit and
"Dad" Elliot.

Women Helpwen
Daily Circulation
With "Show More Interest in the
Campus" as a slogan, 13 university
women launched the campaign for
more subscriptions to The Michigan
Daily in the sororities, league, and
girls' rooming houses last night.
Before the end of the week this com-
mittee will have completed a personal
canvass, and in view of the first night's
results, it is predicted that at least 100
more subscriptions will be added to
what is already The Daily's largest
circulation. The committee is as fol-
lows: Vera Brown, . '18, chairman;
Alice Burtless, '17; Henryetta Brande-
bury, '18; Margaret Birdsell, '18;
Helen Camins, '18; Louise Hatch, '18;
Mary Holmen, '19; Alice Kraft, '18;
Gladys Leonard, '18; Nellie Leonard,
'18; Blanche Lane, '18; Glayds L.
Whelan, '17, and Caroline Wittman, '19.

FROSH TO BATTLE
SOPHS IN RUSH
ON FERRY FIELD
ANNUAL CONTEST TO BE STAGED
ON SATURDAY AT
10 O'CLOCK
TO HOLD PEP' MEETINGS
Freshmen to Meet Wednesday and
Sophomores Thursday
Evening
Saturday is the day, 10 o'clock the
hour, and Ferry field the place where
and when the annual Fresh-Soph rush
is scheduled to take place. There will
the long-suffering yearling be given
an opportunity to avenge himself for
the many insults heaped upon him by
the second year men.
As on the morn of the M. A. C.
game of last year, and many years
previous, it will be the lot of the
younger men to defend the three poles
and the banners of their class against
the strategic onslaughts of the sopho-
mores.
Directly following the pole rush, the
cane spree will be staged. In this
event an equal number of men are
picked from each class and are paired
off with one member of each class on
a single cane. At the end of a certain
length of time the side having the
greatest number of canes wins the
spree.
For the past few years the second
year men have been victorious in the
fall contests while the freshmen have
evened matters by winning those held
in the spring.
As a stimulant for the fray, pep
meetings will be held Wednesday and
Thursday evenings. Here will be
gathered a battalion of speakers who
will do their best to impress upon the
minds of the underclassmen the kind
of spirit they must show when they
appear Saturday morning.
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB PICKED
Announce Names of Those Who Sur.
vived Try Outs; To Hold
Meeting Tonight

Cercle Francais
Director Resigns
Mr. Harry V. Wann, of the French
department, who for the past two years
has been the director of the Cercle
Francais, resigned his position in the
French club at the first meeting of the
organization held last night in the
Cercle's rooms in University hall.
Press of work as an instructor in'
the University, and as a student in the
Graduate school was the reason given
for his retirement. A new director
for the club probably will be an-
nounced within a few days.
Work was also begun last night on
the club's program for the year, which,
besides the usual list of faculty lec-
tures, will include two plays. One
will be given shortly before the Christ-
mas holidays, and the other will be
presented in April. The program of
faculty lectures will not be ready for
publication until after the election of
a new director for the club.
The Cercle will hold another meet-
ing next Monday night, at which the
annual fall elections of the club will
be made. The officers for the year
1916-17 are: President, Lloyd Curby,
'17L; vice president, Marie Cornwell,
'16; secretary, Margaret Kerr, '18;
treasurer, Leland Thompson, '18.
Bflue Sky Lawa
Cases Commence

J. FRAN4K HIANLY
TO SPEAK IN CITY
THIS MOHNING

PROHIBITION CANDIDATE
ARRIVE AT 8:15 O'CLOCK
MICHIGAN CENTRAL

R iL
ON

Arguments
Start

Involving Three Cases
in Supreme Court at
Washington.

IRA LANDRITH.
Prohibition candidate for vice presi-
dent who comes here with Hanly party
FORESTERS RD.SD STEAK FRY
Cascade Glen Scene of Activities To-
night; Speeches on Program
Here's a real steak fry!
Foresters generally advocate "con-
servation" of our national resources,

but tonight's event at Cascade Glen As a result of the try outs held
will find them leaning over their fires, Monday and Thursday, the following

cooking their raw steaks to suit theirI
individual tastes. But the committeel
in charge reports that cider, dough-
nuts, and pickles, will be added to the1
menu to make the annual Camfire
feed and talk a big success.
The procession will meet at the new
science building at 6:15 o'clock tonight,
and march to Cascade Glen, where the
men will split up into groups of from
three to six and build separate fires.;
After the feast, Professor Roth,
toastmaster, will call on various men
for short speeches. It is also expect-
ed that Prof. P. S" Lovejoy, will con-
tribute some of his famous tales of
Paul Bunion, the mythical wonder of
the Pacific northwest.
COUNCIL REFERS QUESTION
City Fathers to Hold Meeting to De-
cide $75,000 Bond Issue
The question of bonding the city of
Ann Arbor to the sum of $75,000 for
extending and improving the water
supply, was referred to a special joint
meeting at the regular session of the
city council last night.
At this meeting, which will be held
in the near future and which will
be attended by the aldermen, the board
of water commissioners, the city en-
gineer, Gardiner S. Williams, and Titus
Hutzel, the route for the new water
main will be determined.
WASHTENAW HUGHES MEN AS-
SEMBLE AT ARMORY BANQUET
Six hundred enthusiastic Republi-
cans turned out at the banquet of the
Washtenaw County Republican com-
mittee held at the Armory last night.
Among the speakers were Chairman
George Sample, Secretary V" E. Van
Ameringen, H. W. Newkirk, Hon. P.
H. Kelley. and Senator F. L. Covert.

made the Girls' Glee club: First so-
pranos, Edna Toland, '20; Katherine
Johnson, '19; Glayds Lynch, '20; Wil-
trud Hildner, '19; Katherine Kilpat-
rick, '20. Second sopranos, Nona
Myers, '20; Mildred Mighell, '19; Olive,
Wiggins, '19; Eva Sharrow, '17. First
altos, Jeanetta Pixley, '20; Margaret
Henkle, '17; Grace Hesse, '18; Aletha
Baldwin, '20; Louise Irish, '18. Second
altos, Lois May, '18; Margaret Hurst,
'19; Louise Kroeger, '20, and Emily
Powell, School of Music.
Christine Stringer, '17, has been ap-
pointed as general manager of the
club. The attendance committee is
composed of Helen Bush, '20; Marion
Calton, '18, and Olive Wiggins, '19.
The publicity committee, Mildred Mig-
hell, '19; the ticket committee, Grace
Raynsford, '18.
An important meeting of the club,
which both old and new members are
expected to attend, will be held to-
night, from 5 o'clock to 6 o'clock in
room 7 at the School of Music.
Mlake Plans for
junior girls Play
The first steps toward the writing
of the Junior girls' play was made
yesterday afternoon when Prof. J. R.
Brumm addressed a meeting of the
junior women in Barbour gymnasium.
In his address, Professor Brumm gave
numerous suggestions for the writing
of the book and the music. It was also
announced that the first outlines of the
plays must be in the hands of the
committee by 4 o'clock Wednesday,
October 25.
Clarissa Vyn, chairman of the junior

Washington, Oct. 16.-Arguments in
cases affecting the blue sky laws of
three states-Ohio, Michigan, and
South Dakota-were begun in the su-
preme court this afternoon. Attorneys'
general of the states handled their3
side of the controversy and former
Attorney General Wickersham in be-
half of the Investment Bankers' as-
sociation appeared as one of the coun-t
sel attacking the constitutionality of
the law.
In the Michigan case, Commissioner
of Banking Merrick, State Treasurer'
Haarer, and Attorney General Fellows
appealed in the N. W. Halsey and com-
pany, and Weiss Fibre Container com-
pany cases.
MoXil0 , Alabama, Oct. 16-Spot cot-
ton sold today at 17.12 cents, the high-
est price known since the civil war. 1
New York, Oct. 16.-A spurt of full
activity such as characterized the re-
cent boom on the stock market, featur-
ed late trading on the exchange today.
United States steel jumped to 111y%,
up 3%. Bethlemem steel sold at 547,
up 15 for the day. The close was
strong.
Long Branch, N. J., Oct. 16.-Am-
bassador Gerard will come here for a
conference and lunch with the Presi-
dent on Monday, it was said this after-
noon.
Berlin, via wireless to Sayville, Oct.
16.-Seventy-four aeroplanes of which
21 were French and 53 English, were
shot down and fell into German hands
during the month of September.
Calumet, Oct. 16,-One of the heav-
iest early snow storms in ten years hit
the copper country in Michigan today.
Three inches of snow fell before noon
and the stormf was then at its height.
Lake Superior shipping ran for shelter
before the gale.

J. FRANK HANLY.
Prohibition candidate for president,
who speaks here today.
PLANS COMPLETED
FOR 1920 SMOKER
Fifteen Hundred Yearlings Expected to
Consume Cider and Smokes
at Union
Final arrangements for the Fresh-
men's reception next Tuesday evening
have been made and all that is needed
to complete the affair is the appear-
ance of 1,500 freshm'en at that time.
Some of the best talent on the
campus such as Grover, star of last
year's opera, DeButts, "shark" pianist
and his orchestra will help entertain.
McKee of the 'Varsity band, will per-
form on his saxaphone. In addition
to this, two 1920 men will offer some
violin selections.
All freshmen in the University are
urgently requested to come to enjoy
cider and smokes. It is not necessary
to be a member of the Union to be
admitted. The only requirement is
that every man wear his cap. Every-
thing will be free.
Freshmen are asked to come directly
to the Union at 7:30 o'clock. The en-
tertainment will begin promptly at that
time. The committees in charge are
as follows:
General chairman, H. E. Storz, '19.
Arrangements committee, Edw. Rapp,
'19E, chairman; William Yaeger, '19E,
Phil Basch, '19. Entertainment com-
mittee, H. E. Stor, '19, chairman; R.
Reavill, '19, J. I. McClintock, '19.
Address Women
On Point System

EXPECTED TO ATTACK WILSON
Ira F. Landrith, Vice Presidential
Candidate, Accompanies
Hanly
J. Frank Hanly, Prohibition can-
didate for president; Ira Landrith,
candidate for vice president, and Oliver
W. Stewart, chairman of the Prohibi-
tion campaign committee, will arrive
this morning at 8:15 o'clock on the
Prohibition special train, enabling the
candidates to address the people at
the Michigan Central depot.
Considerable attention has been 5at-
tracted by the speeches of the can-
didates, who are attacking Woodrow
Wilson and Judge Hughes vigorously.
Democrats and Republicans have
turned out in great numbers to hear
what the Prohibitionists say about
their candidates.
Hanly has the distinction of being
one of the last of the "log cabin can-
didates," being born in a log cabin,
struggling hard in early life, and fight-
ing his way through difficulties to a
plane of power in the Republican party
and serving the people of Indiana for
several years as congressman and
governor.
Landrith is a southern statesman,
educator, editor, orator, and political
leader of national and international
reputation, sacrificing several hundred
dollars a week, because he believes in
the Prohibition cause. The editor is
one of the founders and held the posi-
tion of secretary for many years of the
Tennessee Anti-saloon league.
The Hanly-Landrith special will
visit more than 500 important towns
and cities throughout they United
States before election day. The tour,
which will probably excell any similar
tours by the Republicans or Demo-
crats, and which will eclipse all. past
Prohibition party campaigning, was
made possible through the efforts of
the Prohibition pioneer, Oliver W.
Stewart, of Chicago, and his co-
workers. The local visit was arranged
through supporters of the Prohibition
candidates in this section. The party
will leave here for Jackson, Mich.,
where a monstrous mass meeting is
scheduled.
LEWIS ADDRESSES HUGHES MEN
Dean Discusses Political Situation at
Smoker

New York, Oct. 16.-John B. Foster,
secretary for the New York Giants
baseball team, which also is the Na-
tional Exhibition company, announced
today that he is ready to receive ap-
plication from the public for seats at
the Army-Navy football game, which
will be played November 25 at the
Polo grounds.
FRESHMEN WOMEN POISONED
AT Y. W. C. A. BANQUET
It was rumored yesterday that
nearly 40 freshman women, who at-
tended the banquet tendered them at
the local Y. W. C. A. Saturday even-

"How Michigan women win their
circled 'M's' and sweaters under the
point system" was the essence of an
address given by Miss Ida M. Evans
to nearly 200 women at Sarah Caswell
hall yesterday afternoon. Consider-
able "pep" was instilled into the meet-
ing by frequent cheers led by Olga
Shenkman, '17, and her assistants.
After the address by Miss Evans, a
short business meeting was held at
which the officers of the women's ath-
letic board for the coming year were
elected as follows: Business manager,
Anna Lloyd, '18; publicity manager,
Marjorie Votey, '17; secretary, Con-
stance Winchell, '18; treasurer, Marie
Macaulay, '18; senior representative,
Janet McFarland, '17; junior repre-
sentative, Louise Irish, '18; baseball
manager, Doris McDonald, '19; hockey
manager, Doris Hafford, '17; basket-
ball manager, Lucille Duff, '19; tennis
manager, Margaret Atkinson, '19; hike
manager, Jessie Saunders, '18; track
manager, Ethel Glauz, '19; archey
manager, Carrie Baxter, '17, and fresh-
man r.epresentative, Dorothy Williams,
'20. It was also moved that a money
prize be given, the amount to be
named later, for the best chant for
putting "pep" into the hockey teams
this fall.%
The members of the athletic depart-
ment then adjourned to Palmer field,
where a committee had. prepared a
lunch composed of wieners and rolls,
the latter being toasted over a big
bonfire.

Before an audience of nearly 400,
Dean William Draper Lewis of the
University of Pennsylvania law school
last night addressed the Michigan Re-
publican club at the Union. Dean
Lewis explained his reasons for leav-
ing the Progressive party, of which
he was formerly a prominent member,
and his reasons for advocating the
election of Hughes for president.
He recited in detail the Republican
charges of the failure of Wilson in
handling the Mexican situation, ,the
Lusitania incident, and the Adamson
bill, the three problems that he con-
sidered the most vital and important
that the present administration had
dealt with. Each of the problems were
considered with special reference to
what Mr. Lewis characterized as "the
inability of the president to meet a
strong executive situation."
The meeting was enlivened by the
invitation of Mr. Lewis at the begin-
ning of his speech that his hearer ask
any questions that touched on the
present campaign, and his promise to
answer them to the best of his ability.
During the course of his address, Mr.
Lewis was obliged to go into the Pana-
ma tolls act, the Danbury hatters case,
the U-53 controversy, British censor-
ship of the mails, the Columbia in-
demnification bill, and several others.
Round-Up Club Smoker Thursday
Members of the Round-Up club will
hold their first smoker of the year at
the Michigan Union Thursday night.
The committee in charge has arranged
an interesting program with several at-
tractive features.

Supporters of Wilson to Meet Tonight.
Supporters of Woodrow Wilson will
meet at the Sigma Delta Kappa house,
555 South Division street, at 7:30 o'-
clock tonight to reorganize the Wil-
son club. President E. O. Snethen,
'18L. of last year's Wilson club has

play committee, announced the ap- ing, were attacked with slight symp-
pointment of the following as her as- tons of ptomaine poison. None of the
sistants: Marian Williams, '18; " Anna cases are of a serious nature. The
Lloyd, '18; Helen Brown, '18, and cause was finally attributed to creamed
Henrvetta Branderbury. '18. chicken served at the banquet.

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