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May 11, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-11

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f

THE WEATHER
FAIR-CONTINUEDI
COOL TODAY

4 Ar

ttl 1

UNITED PRE

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

0

I

VOL. XXVII. No. 156.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1917.

PRICE FIVE

r '

PICK JACKSONAN
EMERY TOMNE
0OILY IN1978
ALLEN SHOENFIELD,'18, AND NOR-
SMAN H. IBSEN, '18, GAR.
GOYLE EDITORS
BOARD OF CONTROL IN
MEETING YESTERDAY
E. E. Schacht, 'SE, to Edit Michigan-
ensian, and A. L. Kirkpatrick '1,
to Be Business Manager
Men to fill the offices of managing
editor of The Michigan Daily, the Gar-
goyle, and the Michiganensian were
elected yesterday at a meeting of the
board in control of student publica-
- tions. Nominations were also made
for student members of the board in
control.
H. C. L. Jackson, '18, and C. Philip
Emery, '18, were elected managing
editor and business manager respec-
tively of The Michigan Daily. Jackson
is now telegraph editor of The Daily,
and Emery is one of the assistant bus-
iness managers.
Allen Shoenfield, '18, was elected to
the nosition of managing ecitor of the
Gargoyle, and Norman H. Ibsen. '18, to
the office of business manager. Shoen-
field besides having been a member of
the Gargoyle staff has also written for
the Inlander and The Daily,. Ibsen has
been working on the business staff of
the Gargoyle.
Elmer E. Schacht, '8E. wlil hold
the ohce of managing editor and A. L
Kirkpatrick, '18, that of business man-
ager of the Michiganensian. Both of
these men have worked on the Mich-
iganensian staff for three years.
Nominations for student members of
the board in control of student publi-
cations are: Glenn M. Coulter, '18L,
Lee E. Joslyn, '19L, H. S. Taylor, '17E,
Waldo M. McKee, '18E, Robert C. Pat-
terson, '18; Lester E. Waterbury, '17.
J. L. Stadeker, '18, Paul M. Haler, '18,
Albert E. HorneJr. '18, and Joseph
R. Darnall, '18M, (by petition).
Elections for the Inlander were not
made at this time.
SOPH LITS NOMINATE HERRICK
AND LOUIS FOR ASST. TREAS.
Letters of resignation from Presi-
dent Carl Mason and Treasurer James
M. Bailey were read at the .meeting
of the sophomore lit class held yes-
terday afternoon in the Economics
building. The class moved not to ac-
cept the resignations due to the short
time yet remaining for the officers to
serve, but decided to elect as assistant
for the treasurer, Harry Louis and
Douglas Herrick being nominated for
that office.
Cecil Miller and Edwin Cunliffe
were nominated for Student council-
men, and elections of officers fo the
spring games resulted as follows:
Captain of pushball contest, E. E. Wie-
man; captain of the lightweight tug-
of-war, H. R. Telfer; captain of re-
lay, 'R. R. Beardsley. The election
of the Student councilman and the as-
sistant treasurer will be held today
in the campus elections.
PROF. HERBERT R. CROSS
INITIATED BY TOASTMASTERS
Toastmasters, campus honorary so-
ciety, held a banquet in honor of the
members who will leave for military
service, last night at the Catalpa Inn.

Prof. Herbert R. Cross of the fine
arts department was initiated into the
society. Plans for the spring party
were also discussed.
Donald Smith, '17E, acted as toast-
master, and speeches were given by
John C. B. Parker, '17, and Harold
Fitzgerald, '17, Robert W. Collins, '17E,
and Professor Cross.
TAU SIGMA DELTA CHOOSES
MEN FOR SPRING INITIATION
Tau Sigma Delta, the national hon-
orary architectural fraternity, elected
four junior engineers at its annual
spring election. Scholarship is the
primary qualification for meibership
to this organization, the candidates be-
ing chosen from the highest one-fifth
of the class.
The initiates are: Paul 0. Davis,
Orrin F. Stone. Phillip B. Maher, and

Soph Prom Holds
Forth in Armory
Sl nu r Co himes Are Order for the
Annual Dance
Tonight
Syncopated music by the Wright
orchestra will furnish rhythmical ac-
companiment for the soph prom danc-
ers at the Armory tonight. Sport coats
and white trousers will be the order
for the men.
The music will begin at 9 o'clock,
concluding two hours after midnight.
The women's programs will be in the
nature of black leather card cases with
gold 1919 numerals stamped upon
them. The men will be supplied with
a combination program and bill folder
case.
UNIVERSITY IJOMEN TO
HAVENER ORMITORY
DlETROIT ALUMNAE EXPECTED TO
GO AHEAD WITH PLANS
AT ONCE
A third dormitory for women, for
the past two years the dream and
goal of alumnae all over the state,
will be realized before next fall, ac-
cording to a rumor which came from
official circles yesterday.
The Detroit branch of the associa-
tion of Michigan women has decided,
because of the war, not to wait to
raise the money for a dormitory com-
parable in size with the two now in
use, but to expend the funds they now
have in a small one.
The report stated that the associa-
tion intends to purchase a house, re-
model it, and furnish it in readiness
for the opening of college in October.
The residence, which will probably be
called "Alumnae House," is said to be
planned on a partly co-operative basis,
will accommodate about 16 girls be-
side the social director, and contain
comm rlo parlors, dining room, and
dormitory.,
Claire M. Sanders, '04, of Detroit
is treasurer of the association and
many other prominent Detroit and Ann
Arbor women are interested in the
plan.

FIGHT ONTO PASS
BIG REVENUE BILL

Joffre and War Commission are
Greeted; by Thousands in N..

Y.

(hoverunent's $1,800,000,000
Meets with Oppos.
sition

Request

by George Martin
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
New York, May 10.-Marshall Joffre
heard the shrill cheers of thousands
of women and children today when the
French war commission traveled a
path of swirling flags and surging
crowds to Prospect park, Broklyn,
where the Lafayette monument was
unveiled.
More than 50,000 people greeted the

Frenchmen at the park. Ten thousand
little school girls almost hidden in a
fluttering field of American and French
banners sang the "Marseilles" as the
commissioners approached the shroud-
ed monument. Standing beneath a
huge American banner, Vice-Premier
Viviani received 10,000 francs raised
by popular subscription for war re-
lief and a silver loving cup. Joffre
received a sword.

KITCHIN LEADS DEBATE FOR
PASSAGE OF APPROPRIATION

Declares United States Should
War Expenses as They
Arise

PayI

Washington, May 10.-One of the bit-
terest intersectional fights in the his-
tory of congress was forecast when the
government's $1,800,000,000 revenue
bill, one of the largest single taxa-
tion measures in history, was formally
taken up for consideration by the low-
er body this afternoon.
The oratorical battle began when
Kitchin, in charge of the measure,
presented it with a plea for "all Amer-
icans to do their bit to finance the
war." "This bill must pass so our
children's children will not have to
pay for the war of this generation,"
he said. "This must be a pay-as-we-go
war."
Claim Southerners Burden North
Northern men, Democrats and Re-
publicans alike, claimed the southern
members in control of the house have
"burdened the country above the Mas-
on-Dixon line with the war taxes but
have let the south off lightly. They
attacked particularly what they called
the "sectional system of taxation pur-
sued in the bill."
Five billion dollars, Kitchin said
must be spent by the United States in
the next year. "Billions of dollars of
bonds have been issued that will be a
burden on our children and our child-
ren's children unless we employ tax-
ation," he said.
Must Raise Every Dollar
"When this bill comes to a vote the
house must put this present burden
on ourselves who declared the war, and
show the necessary spirit of sacrifice.
No American can say, I, refuse to pay
my part.' I hope no man here will
complain that this bill taxes his state
and his district. There are a few pro-
visions in this billIwould vote for
in ordinary times but we must raise
every dollar on it. Our expenses in the
next year are already estimated at
$3,800,000,000. A man who wanted to
pay his taxes by bonds would be a
coward. I think we ought to pay half
the expense by taxation."
"We can't finish this debate before
some time Saturday," said majority
leader Mann, when Kitchin tried to
limit debate to two days. Kitchin did
not press his attempt. He began im-
mediately to explain the bill.
Fordney Says He Will Vote for Bill
Representative Fordney of Michi-
gan, ranking Republican member of
the ways and means committee, an-
nounced he would support the bill as
it is. Kitchin said he did not believe
the business men and manufacturers
were slackers. "They will stand by
this bill," he said. "If we refuse to
tax all the industries that have said
they will be ruined 'by this bill we
could not raise $100,000, but they will
come across."
Kitchin insisted there had been no
politics in the framing of the bill. He
said unless the tariff provision is
adopted shoes and other necessities
will have to be taxed. If Great Brit-
ain's income and excess profits taxa-
tion were enforced in the United
States, Kitchin said $5,500,000,000 could
be raised by them. Kitchin concluded
his speech at 2 o'clock. Immediately
a bombardment of questions started.
The 5 per cent tax on new automobiles
and new tires was subjected to at-
tack by many.
CERCLE FRANCAIS BANQUET
LAST SOCIAL AFFAIR OF YEAR

9OD LIT STUDENTS TAKE 'NO SEPRATE PEACE
PART IN INITIAL DRILL! BY U. S. SAYS LANSING

COL. P. E. BURSLEY STARTS
ANIZATION OF
MEN

OR-

Nine hundred literary students, tak-
ing the new course in military drill,
filled the west walk of the campus
from North University to South Uni-
versity avenues, took part in the drill.
Colonel Philip E. Bureley was in
command and appointed temporary of-
ficers. Following the drill Colonel
Bursley stated, "I am very much
pleased with the turnout and expect
that many more will come out for
Monday's drill. Some probably took
advantage of the lenience with which
the first absence was considered. If,
however, after today, two absences
are recorded against a student, the
credit for the course will be lost to
him. To be marked as present, all
those who take the drill must be at
hand at 4:05 o'clock. We expect to
start at that time always."
Pre-medics who were out yesterday
for drill with the lit students will be
asked to withdraw because it con-
flicts with the drill which is done in
the Medical school. Permanent of-
ficers will be elected at next Monday's
drill.
,j*rvard to Eraezt Me ioral 'to V terans
Cambridge, May 10.-Harvard will
honor her 19 European war veterans
by erecting a memorial to their
memory.

ADMINISTRATION DOES NOT LOOK
FOR NEW GERMAN
PROPOSAL
Washington, May 10.-Stating that
the department had no intimation of
any forthcoming peace proposals from
Germany, Secretary Lansing late to-
day declared the United States would
"probably act only in concert with
the allies upon any peace proposals
that should materialize."
This is the first official announce-
ment that America is actually work-
ing in full accord with the allies. It
has been well known heretofore, both
from the speech of President Wilson
and from veiled comments of Secre-
tary Lansing that the United States
intended to make no separate peace.
It has not been known, however, that
a virtual agreement to this effect had
been reached. America's peace terms
are known in a general way from the
president's speech, but up to the pres-
ent time all administration leaders
have refused to be specific about
America's war aims or peace terms.
In brief, the United States is in the
war until Germank's ruthless subma-
t mnan'ce is elmĀ°,inaled and until
: German ruthless .ss is crushed so
that it cannot again rise to threaten
the peace and security of the whole
world.

STUDENTS VTEIN::;
CAMPUS ELECTION
TO BE HELD TODA'.
BALLOT BOXES IN FRONT 0
LIBRARY FROM 7:30 TO
6:30 O'CLOCK
ATHLETIC COUPON 23
REQUIRED FOR VOTIN(
Michigan Union, .Athletic Assoeatlo
and Student Council
Represented
Today is the. date set for the al
campus election. The balloting wi
take place from 7:30 to 6:30 o'clock
Tables will be placed in front of t
Library if the weather 'is favorab
or, if not, the votes will be cast i
the corridor of University hall.
The organizations to be represente
in the election are the Michigan Unioi
the Student council, the Athletic a
sociation, and the engineer honor con
mittee. Nominees for student men
bership on the board in control a
student publications will not be vote
upon because the constitution of th
organization demands that nomine
must be announced two weeks befoi
an election takes place.
Jackson Declines J-llt Nomnatlon
Albert Foley, who was third in t
nomination for junior lit Student couw
cilman, will be voted upon in plac
of H. C. L. Jackson, who has resignee
Jackson has also resigned as a non
inee for recording secretary of ti
Union.
In voting for athletic officers athet
coupon number 23 must be presete
before the bllot will be accepted.
Men for the officers of presiden
recording secretary, class and con
bined department vice-presidencies C
the Union will be voted upon and tb,
fk:ulty representatives of the boaTrd
directors also will be elected. Th
campus at large and class nomine
for the Student council will be electe
with the exception of the junit
pharmic representative, H. B. MWi
Hams having been chosen already.
Athletic llanagers to Be Eleted
Campus officers for the positionst
athletic managerships will be chose
by the ballot. The officers are t
football, baseball, and track managet
with their assistants. Engineer sti
dents will be elected to serve on t
engineer honor committee.
PHI SIGMA TAKES IN 13 MEN
IN INITIATION LAST NIGH
Thirteen men were initiated In
the Beta chapter of the Phi Sigm
honorary biological society, at a hee
ing held last night. An initiation bal
quet will be held for the new me
bers on Saturday at Mack's tea room
The initiates are as follows: Prc
H. H. Bartlett, Frank N. Blanchar
grad., Ray C. Friesner, grad., The
phile Raphael, A. M., Charles E. Sand
grad., Roy C. Thomas, grad., Paul
King, '17, Norman F. Miller, '19M, L
Bonar, '18, W. Parker Stowe, '18
Frank L. Tobey, '18, Lester C. Tod
'18M, H. E. Bozer, '19M.
RED CROSS CLASSES FORCED
TO DISCONTINUE MEETING
Classes in home nursing and hygiei
under the auspices of the local R

Cross will no longer meet, since Hele
Sellman, '06, former assistant supe
intendent of the Saginaw General ho
pital, who has been in charge of tl
classes, has been called away sudde:
ly.
Arrangements for tie refund of tl
fees already paid by students enrollE
in the course have been completed ar
money can be had by applying at Ba
bour gymnasium.
WOMEN NOMINATE COMMITTEES
AT CLASS MEETINGS TODA
Committees for Junior Girls' pla
freshman spread, and judiciary con
cil will be nominated at class mee
ings of freshman, sophomore ai
junior women at 4 o'clock this afte
noon in the parlors in Barbour gyi
nasium. Members of the prese
judiciary council will preside over t
meetings and a complete attendan
of all non-graduating women is d

1. ^- .

.1

ANGELL

WILL SPEAK

Chktago lan to Address Phi Beta
Kappa Reception Tonigbt
Dean James R. Angell of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, will give the principal
address at the annual reception of Phi
Beta Kappa, the literary scholarship
honor society, to be held at 8 o'clock
to iht in Barbour gymnasium.
The reception is for all members of
the society. It has always been the
custom of the society to hold an an-
nual, banquet after the election of
iembers but on account of thu war
situation it was decided to dispense
with a banquet this year.
VERNE E. BURNETT, '17, MADE
ASSOCIATE EDITOR OF MAGAZINE
Verne E. Burnett, '17, formerly as-
sociate editor of The Michigan Daily,
has been made associate editor of the
American Boy magazine in Detroit.
Under the direction of Griffith Ogden
Ellis, '95L, Walter K. Towers, '10-'12L,
and E. P. Grierson, '12, this magazine
has increased its circulkatiou until it
ranks among the 20 largest magazines
of the country.
PROL}ESSOR WENLEY REPRESENT
GLASGOW AT INSTALLATION
Prof. R. M. Wenley of the philosophy
department, will represent the Univer-
sity of Glascow at the inauguration of
Dr. Walter A. Jessup as president of
the University of Iowa, according to
word which Professor Wenley has just
received.

Nominees for Offices to Be Voted
On All- CampusElection Friday'
The following men, nominees for the Union, will be voted upon
today, the regular campus election day:
PRESIDENT-C. W. Fischer, '18, J. D. Hibbard, 'ISE.
RECORDING SECRETARY-C. C. Andrews, '18, H. E. Braun, '19L,
R. T. McDonald, '18, R. R. Winslow, '19L.a
LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENT-A. G. Gabriel, '18, A. V. Ippel, 118, C.
W. Neumann, '18, R. C. Patterson, '18, E. Wunsch, '18.
ENGINEERING VICE-PRESIDENT -S. S. Attwood, '18E, H. W. Col-
lins,'118E, W. S. Dinwiddie, 18E, E. G. Dudley, '1i8E, W. M. Mc.
Kee, 'l8E.
LAW VICE-PRESIDENT-G. F. Hurley, '18L, L. E. Joslyn, '1911 W.
D. Nance, '19L, G. L. Ohrstrom, '19L.
MEDICAL VICE-PRESIDENT-J. 1I. Darnall, '1SM, R. M. McKA,
'1SM, T. L. Tolan, '18M.
COMBINED DEPARTMENTS "VICE-PRESIDENT - D, L. Mitchell,
'18D, J. L. Powers, '18P.
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES FOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS -
Dean Henry M. Bates, Prof. William A. Frayer, Dr. Reuben
Peterson.
The following men, nominees for athletic managerships, will be
voted upon today, the regular campus election day:
FOOTBALL MANAGERS-Chas. F. Boos, '18, Leland N. Scofield, '19L.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-DeForest W. Bucknaster, '19, John D
Cameron, '19, Alfred Mason, '19, Donald M. Springer, '19E, Robert
L. Storrer, '19E, Harlon N. Walker, '19, William D. Craig, -19,
Matthew S. Towar, '19.
BASEBALL MANAGERS-Stephen G. Pratt, '18E, Jasper B. Reid, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, Clark Bishop, '19,
Robert Daugherty, '19, Sherman Fitz-Simons, '19E, Austin Har-
mon. '19, Frederick B. Lyons, '19, Donald Yerkes, '19, Arthur E.
Zigler, '19.
TRACK MANAGER-Eldridge Dudley, 'ISE, Frederick J. Thieme, '18E.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-J. C. Finn, '19, F. S. Sanders, '19E, James H.
Clarke, '19, P. 0. Avery, '19, G. B. Pearson, '19, L. L. Matthews,
'19, Carl Rash,.'19, Harry Cossett, '19.
INTERCOLLEGE MANAGER-Arthur T. Heuer, '18, Carl Neu-
mann, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGER--John I). Watts, '18, George Codd, '20, Harry,
M. Carey, '19.
The following men, campus at large nominees for the utudent
council, will bi . apou today, at the regular campus elecct n:
election day:
Chester W. Clark, '18, Robert T. McDonald, '18, Clarence A. Hart,
'18E, Alan V. Livingston, 'ISE, Rollin R. Winslow, '19L, and
Ernest L. Zeigler, '19L.
1918 MEDICS-E. C. Baumgarten, C. A. Bosworth.
1918 PHARMICS-E. R. Crandall, H. B. McWilliams.
1918 HOMOEOPS-L. J. Boyd, Edward C. Stebbins, C. S. Emery.
1918 DENTS-lI. C. Cramer, F. H. Tiusman,
JUNIOR ENGINEERING HONOR COMMITTEE-C. A. Hart, '18E, F.
J. IKortick, '18E, P. A. Vickers, '18E, E. M. Schaifter, '18E.

CHANGE SENIOR SWING-OUT
DATE TO MONDAY, MAY

13)

Owing to the fact that so many
seniors are planning to leave college,
the date for the annual senior Swing-
out has been definitely changed to
Monday, May '13. All seniors are
urged to procure their caps and
gowns as soon as possible as only
three days are left before the event.
The program will be announced to-
morrow.

Cercle Francais met socially for the
last time this year at a banquet held
at the Delta cafe last night.
Prof. Edward L. Adams spoke on
"The Progress of the Cercle" and
Prof. Arthur G. Canfield on the "Re-
lation of the Cercle to the French De-
partment." Reminiscences were re-
called by Adele Crandall, '17, who
spoke on "The Cercle Three Years
Ago" and the future was treated by
Lloyd Curby, '19L, in his address,
"The Coming Year." Ludwig Kuijala,
'19, spoke for the 21 new members
who were taken into the soiety

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