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May 10, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC

DAILY

DRILL TO E
DURIN IS UMMER

R COURSES TO BE
1EI) IN UNIVERSITY
NEXT SEMESTER

OF-

tary training under Major
as W. Castle will be continued
gh the summer session of the
rsity, according to information
out yesterday afternoon by
ent Harry B. Hutchins. This
iecided upon Monday night, when
,egents' committee on military in-
ion, composed of Regents Bulk-
nd Hanchett, and the deans of
arlous schools and colleges, diet
asident Hutchins' office to decide
n matters relative to military'
ng on the campus. Major Castle
resent at the meeting.
was also decided that military
es will be introduced in the Uni-
y next year under General Or-
No. 49. This year because of the
time available, nothing but drill
can be attempted, but in the
e it is planned to have regular
es of a military nature as a regu-
rt of the University curricula.
eral plans were also formulated
meeting to co-ordinate the work
different campus drill organiza-
but definite plans in this con-
n are not yet ready to be put
peration.
CUSS FOOD SUPPLY
er Confers with Wilson; Does
Not Want Dictatorshp
shington, May 9.-Herbert C.
r held an hour conference with
dent Wilson this afternoon on
>od situation. Hoover discussed
haracter of the organization nec-
y to protect the food supply of
country and the allies, telling
hadl been done in Europe along
lines.
did not indicate after the confer-
what part if any he might take
nerica's food control system. "I
want to be food dictator of the
d States," he said. "The man who
that job will die on the barbed
entanglements of the front line
nchments."
,C. A. SEEKING SUMMER
WORK FOR MEN IN EAST
ployment Secretary R. F. Wu-
i, '17, of the Y. M. C. A. is send-
>ut letters to employers in De-
iBuffalo, Rochester and other
a in the east sking them to place
orders for men for summer work
him. Any student who wishes to
an application with Secretary
isch for employment this sum-
is asked to do so at once.
as Aggies Prefer Farm Work
wrence, Kan., May 9.-"Back to
and friends, back to home and
er" sounds better than "tenting
e old camp ground" to agricul-
students at the University of
as. -One hundred have withdrawn
ctual enlistment, while 114 have
rawn to go back to the farm.
xperiment at Botanical Gardens
a 17,000 evening primrose plants
which Prof. H. H. Bartlett of
otanical department and 12 stu-
have been experimenting have
set out in the botanical gardens.
rimeuts in evolution with the
s have been conducted for some
indoors.

* * * * * * * * *.* * * * * * * *
* .
AT THE THEATERS
* 4
* TODAY *
* *
* Majestic-Comedy drama, "The *
* Heart of Texas Ryan." *
* Rae -- Viola Dana in "The *
* Threads of 'Fate." *
* _ _*
* Arcade-George Walsh in "High *
* Finance.' Also Charlie Chap. *
* lii in "Easy Street." *
* Orpheum-Kathlyn Williams in *
*"Out of the Wreck." Also car- *
L oons and Ford tra-vels.
AT THE WHITNEY
Otis Skinner's new play "Mr. An-
tonio," coming to the Whitney theater
Wednesday, May 16, centers around
the part of a modern Samaritan play-
ed by a cheerful Italian organ grinder.
Mr. Antonio belongs to a group of
small town people who condemn one
of their number when he succumbs to
the temptations of the metropolis.
This new play is the work of Booth
Tarkington and was written especial-
ly for Mr. Skinner.

Pledges frlexio 's
Strict Neutrality
Mexican Ambassador Bonillas As-
sures Government Country Will
Not Enter War
Washington, May 9.-Pledge of Mex-

Post. The information was given out
by the ambassador after questions had
been cabled to Mexico City and author-
ization for replies received from Presi-
dent Carranza, it was stated.
Bonilas declared Mexico has no
powerful wireless stations as report-
ed and those being operated are strict-
ly censored. There are no German of-
ficers in the Mexican army, he said,

co's neutrality, the ambassador as-
serted.
"Mexico has not placed an embargo
on fuel oil or other necessities which
belligerents now import from Mexico,"
he said, "and as it derives revenues
which are of importance to its present
economic situation no changes are to
be expected in this regard."
1linois Students Sign for Service
Champaign, Ill., May 9.-Twenty
men of the University of Illinois took
the oath of allegiance to the Ameri-

ico's strict and unyielding neutral- and no German financial institutions
ity in the war is given in an interview have any connection with the govern-
with Mexican Ambassador Bonillas ment. The greatest care will be ex-
printed this afternoon in the Evening ercised to prevent violation of Mexi-

can ambulance field service before
5,000 spectators last night. They will
sail from New York May 19.
Prof. Aubrey Tealdi lectured yester-
day in Olivet on "Landscape Gard-
ening."
Dr. A. M. Barrett spoke at the Ypsi-
lanti Normal yesterday on "The Cause
and Prevention of Insanity."

RT a^
FF t tl(
By Th. e T
Hc{g Se -Eli

AT THE WHITNEY *

After a tour of the country follow-
ing its engagement here, D. W. Grif-
fith's "The Birth of a Nation" will be
seen at the Whitney theater for two
days commencing Friday, May 18. This
production, presenting scenes of the
Civil war, took eight months to com-
plete and some of the scenes required
the services of 18,000 people and 3,000
horses.

:

i

AT THE MAJESTIC

There is a genuine forest fire in
"The Heart of Texas Ryan," featuring
Bessie Eyton, George Fawcett, and
Frank Campeau at the Majestic today
and tonight. Immense timber lands
are seen in flames, trees topple over,
and a girl is rescued at the risk of
a man's life.
Halton Powell and his company of
25 are coming to the Majestic in "Step
Lively" for three days, commencing
Monday. The advance sale of seats
will begin Friday morning.
AT THE ARCADE
George Walsh in "High Finance"
and Charlie Chaplin in "Easy Street"
are at the Arcade theater today.
George Walsh, one of. the greatest
football punters in Fordham college,
carries out the theme in "High Fin-
ance" that money is easy to get if you
don't care how you get it. So when
he is cut off from his allowance he
makes good his theory.
Committee to Plan 1917 Fresh Frolic
Plans for the annual freshman
frolic will be made at a meeting of
the committee of fresh lit class this
afternoon. The dance will be held
at the Armory on either May 25 or
June 1, and the ticket sale will be'
limited to 150. Freshmen will be
given, first choice and if there are any
tickets left the sale will be opened
to the sophomore,. As is custonary
at this affair, the men will wear blue
coats and white Crousers.
Are they Human? Are they Me-
chanical? Those Grafonola Twins.
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at the
Allmendingr Music Shop, 122 E. Lib-
erty St.--Adv. 10-12

1857 Dry Goods, Furniture and Women's Fashions 1917

SWING-OUT, Monday,
May 14th. Cap and
Gown orders filled imme-
diately. Correct Costumes
for Men and Women in all
Departments.
Women's Section-Second Floor

. . . . . . . . . . . ._
.- . ...-:.... . .. . . .._::. . .-
. . . . . . . . ......:. . t:V..

kuppenheimer Clothes are for sale in Ann Arbor by

.ten t'S

Section - Third Floor

211
S. Main St.

N.

F. ALLEN

CO.

211
S. Main St.

li

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