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May 10, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-10

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
I ,ANI) COOIL

ri an

aiti

i

UNITED PRESc
DAY TN!) lIGHT
WIRE SERI CE

0- t

VOI. XXVII. No. 155. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1917. PRICE FlVE% CI

ITS TO ORGANIZE
FOR DILL TODAY
Students to Assemble at West Side of
Campus at 4 O'clock
for Roll Call
ELECTION CARDS FOR WORK
MUST BE IN BY ::30 O'CLOCK
Men Attending Eight of Nine Periods
to Be Given One Hour Credit
Toward Graduation
Drill for all students of the literary
college will start this afternoon
promptly at 4 o'clock.
The seniors will assemble in front
of Alumni Memorial hall, the juniors
in front of University hall, the sopho-
mores north of the juniors, and the
freshmen in front of the Museum. All
men are expected to ,be in ranks at
4 o'clock, but the roll will not be
called until 4:05 o'clock, giving those
having 3 o'clocks time to get to the
assembling place.
All those taking the course must
enroll before 3:30 o'clock this after-
noon to get in the battalion. The
election cards are to be handed in to
the registrar's office.
All men attending eight out of nine
drills will receive one hour credit.
Sickness or other causes for which
the student is not responsible will not
excuse him from the drill.
The officers will be chosen from
those in the battalion who have had
training in military schools and in
camps. Those who do not care to
maintain discipline as meted out by
the officers or obey commands with-
out question are asked to refrain from
enrolling.
Six ten Elected
Into Quarterdeck
Six initiates of Quarterdeck, marine
engineering society, spent, part of the
afternoon yesterday paddling the large
scow taken from the naval tank up
the diagonal walk. The initiates were:
Paul B. Taylor, '1E, C. S. Lawton,
'18E, Clark Swartfigeur, '18E, C. F.
Mayer '18E, E. C. Burns '18E, H. F.
Robinson, '18E.
A banquet was to have been held
last evening, but due to the fact that
it conflicted with the war smoker the
banquet will be held tonight. The
speakers will be Prof. H. C. Sadler,
Prof. E. M. Bragg, L. R. Hussa, '17E,
and C. S. Lawton, '18E.
ALCHEMISTS TAKE IN
SEVEN NEW MEMBERS
Chemical Society holds Annual Ban-
quet in Honor of Initiates
at Catalpa Inn
Alchemists initiated seven men yes-
terday afternoon. The initiates were:
Howard W. Sheldon, '17E, Earl C.
Fries, '17E, Fred W. Sullivan Jr., '18,
Warren W. Otis, '18E, Harold R. Snow,
'18E, C. Phillip Beats, '19E, and Hu-
bert S. Leader, '19E.
Prof. W. G. Smeaton, Prof. H. H.
Williard, L. B. Hadley, '17E, and Fred
W. Sullivan Jr., '18, were the speak-
ers at the banquet given last evening
at the Catalpa Inn.
PARDEE, '17, ELECTED
Light Balloting Cwracterizes Senior
Vote for President

Characterized by light voting the
election of the senior literary class
yesterday resulted in Earl E. Pardee,
'17, being chosen president. C. M.
Jickling, '17, was elected class treas-
urer.
Germany to Make Peace Terms Soon
Amsterdam, May 9.-Members of the
German Reichstag were .quoted in
Berlin dispatches today as predicting
Chancel von Bethmann-Hollweg's
reply to questions on Germany's war
aims would be preceded by an official
peace pronouncement on behalf of the
central powers. Date for the chancel-
lor's speech was not specified. x
German Professor Gets Federal Job
New York, May 9.-W. A. Hervey,;
professor of German at Columbia, has
been called to Washington to take a,
position with the government.

Mlighty Warriors
Scalp Palefaces

Men of Micliigamua Gather at
wam for Second Spring
Initiation

Wig-

Michigamua held a second spring
initiation last night in its wigwam,
taking in the following 10 new pale-
faces:
Merle B. Doty, '18E.
Clarence A. Hart, '18E.
Albert E. Horne Jr., '18.
Norman H. Ibsen, '18E.
Gordon C. Mack, '18.
Robert T. McDonald, '18.
James II. Sharpe, '18E.
Victor H. Simmons, '18.
Robert W. Watson, '18M.
Richard F. Weske, '18E.
NEW YORKERS GREET
FRENCH COMMISSION
TENS OF THOUSANDS ASSEMBLE
IN STREETS T1'O CHEER
WAR PARTY
By George Martin
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
New York, May 9.-The climax of
the tour of Marshall Joffre, Vice-
Premier Viviani and the other mem-
bers of the French war commission
was reached this afternoon when the
French representatives arrived in New
York. Tens of thousands were mazs-
ed in the streets of lower Manhattan
to greet the commissioners.
Skyscrapers Jammed with Spectators
The Battery where the commission-
ers landed from Jersey City shortly
before 5 o'clock, was banked with men
am women. The crowd broke through
the police lines shouting and waving
flags and cheering Jofre. The trip
up Broadway was an ovation. Each
window of the great skyscrapers was
jammed with humanity. From the
brokers' offices great roles of ticker
tape came fluttering down upon the
Frenchmen. Flags were everywhere.
$cool Children Cheer Commissioners
M.ssed in front of the City hall
were hundreds of school children who
broke into cheering and singing as
the autos bearing the commissioners
rolled up. Joffre and Viviani had in
the machines enormous bouquets of
American Beauty roses presented to
them by the customs house employees.
One of the greatest crowds that ever
gathered about the City hall was
massed in the park and lined far down
Broadway and Park Row. The com-
missioners were received at the City
hall by Mayor Mitchell and other city
officials. I
CONFEREES AGREE
ON PAY INCREASE
Make Progress in Efforts to Reach
Agreement .on Conscrip-
tion Act
Washington, May 9.-House and sen-
ate conferees on the army bill this
afternoon agreed on its pay increase
feature and as a result all enlisted
men now receiving less than $21 per
month will be raised $10 a month.
The conferees were reported to be
making some progress in their efforts
toward agreement on the conscrip-
tion act, although Senator Chamber-
lain was skeptical that complete
agreement could be reached.
It was understood that the Roose-
velt division amendment probably
would be stricken from the bill by
the conferees, that the arm'y prohibi-
tion amendment feature would be re-
tained, and that the draft age limit
would be fixed at 21 to 31 years.
JUNIOR LITS NOMINATE REEM
AND JACKSON FOR COUNCILIAN

Guy A. Reem and Harold C. L. Jack-
son were nominated for the office of
student councilman at the class meet-
ing of the junior lits held yesterday
afternoon. The election will be held
on Friday at the campus elections.
The resignation of George B. Dan-
iels, class secretary, who is a member
of the naval militia, was announced
and Karl L. Wehmeyer, chairman of
the finance committee, was automatic-
ally acclaimed treasurer. Announce-'
ment was also made of the informal
class party to be held May 29 at the
Union.

COUNCI PLANS SPRING
GAMES FORNEXT EEK
CONTESTANTS WEIGH IN TODAY
AND TOMORROW AT GYM-
NASIUM
Plans for the annual spring con-
tests to be held Friday and Saturday,
May 18 and 19, have been nearly com-
pleted by the Student council commit-
teemen in charge. The tug-of-war will
take place at 4 o'clock Friday after-
noon across the Huron and the relays
and pushball contests will be held at
10 o'clock Saturday morning on Ferry
field. Pep meetings will be held next
we.ek on Wednesday night for the
freshmen and the following night for
the sophomores.
Weighing in for tug-of-war contest-
ants will be held today from 3 to 5
o'clock and tomorrow from 1 to 3
o'clock in the locker room of Water-
man gymnasium. There will be 40
men picked for each of the three teams.
The lightweight contestants must
weigh less than 135 pounds, the mid-
dleweights between 135 and 160
pounds, and the heavyweights more
than 160 pounds.
The chairmen of the relay race,
pushball contest, and tug-of-war com-
mittees are B. A. Stenberg, '17E H.
A. Taylor, '17E, and W. H. Hogan, '17,
respectively.
SENATORS ACTIVE;
FEAR COTURE GAG
Members Introduce Flood of Amend-
ments to Prevent Passage of
Espionage Bill
By Robert 3. Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 9.-Fearing a
closure gag on discussion of the ad-
ministration's espionage bill, senators
this afternoon loosened a flood of
amendments which would serve to pro-
tect the interest of the American press.
"Owing to the fact there is now on
the vice-president's desk a motion to
invoke closure and thereby cut off
full and free discussion of this meas-
ura, I am taking the course of intro-
ducing an amendment to the bill now,"
Senator Lafollette of Wisconsin said.
Senator Johnson of California then
Qumped up and said, "To be on the
safe side I wish to introduce an
amendment to strike out the censor-
ship section of the espionage bill."
Cummins, Iowa, followed Johnson with
an amendment making the censorship
feature of the bill inapplicable to the
proceedings of congress. Kirby and
Kellogg also followed with amend-
ments.
VOTES WILL BE CAST FOR ALL
CAMPUS ELECTIONS TOMORROW
All-campus elections will be held to-
morrow. The organizations to be rep-i
resented in the ballot are the Michi-
gan Union, Student council, board in
control of student publications, Ath-
letic association, and the engineer
honor committee. Class student coun-
cilmen will also be elected. The bal-
loting will take place from 7:30 to
6:30 o'clock in front of the Library
if the weather is favorable, or if not,
in the corridor of University hall.
10 WOMEN ELECTED
- TO SENIOR SOCIETY
olonorary Society to Hold Initiation

and Banquet Tuesday
Evening
Ten members of the class of 1918
have been elected to Senior society,
honorary society for independent wom-
en. They are Ruth Bailey, Marin Gal-
ton, Olive Hagen, Marjorie Kilbury,
Alice Kraft, Marie Macaulay, Mildred
Migheil. Olga Perschbacher, Grace
Rose, and Jessie Saunders.
The initiation will be held at 6
o'clock on Tuesday, May 22, after
v hich a banquet at Foster's tea room
will be given in honor of the new
members.

GEMANS AND BITISH
IN DEADLOCK BATLE
TEUTON ATTACK ADVANCES IN
MASSED LINES; ARTILLERY
FIRE CONTINUES
By William Phillip Simms
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
With the British'Armies in the Field,
May 9.-Tremendous attacks of massed
forces, violent artillery fire on both
sides, doggedly stubborn resistance
and equally determined attack marked
the fighting of last night and today
around Bullecourt and Gavrelle.
British Repel Attack of Teutons
No amount of losses inflicted by
British gun fire seems to stop the
German attack until the massed lines
literally melt away. One such attack
was thus repelled by the British forces
around the "Gavrelle wind-mill last
night. It was preceded by a terriffic
German bombardment of the position.
At almost the same instant the enemy
massed for an attack near Fresnoy,
three miles to the north of the wind-
mill. They were dispersed by crush-
ing artillery fire. British counter at-
tacks followed soon after and directed
at German positions west of the vil-
lage strengthened the British lines.
German's Show Nervousness
The fighting front now runs just
adjacent to the western limits of
Fresnoy. Throughout last night the
Germans showed the most intense
nervousness, particularly around
Bullecourt. There the Teuton guns
sprayed a constant fire in front of
the British trenches, the enemy evi-
dently fearing another attack. Prus-
sian artillery was exceedingly active;
during the night between Cojeul river
and Monchy, as well as at intervals
along the Scarp river front.
CANADIAN CLUB WILL ELECT
OFFICERS AT DINNER TONIGHT
Election of officers for next year
will take place at the dinner given;
tonight by the Canadian club. Thei
dinner will be held at 7 o'clock at
Willetts' cafe and will end the activ-
ities of the club for this year.

Plant Tubers on
University Land
Use 40 Acres Available to Grow Pota.
toes for Hospitals This
Summer
Potatoes for use in the University
hospitals will be grown on about 40
acres of University land this summer
with the buildings and grounds force
doing the cultivating.
The 40 acresAis all the land avail-
able without plowing up the site of
cap night festivities and, the ground
used in surveying practice, Secretary
Shirley W. Smith said yesterday. Ten
acres lies in the old botanical garden
and the remainder near the boulevard,
including a tract donated by Regent
J. E. Beal.
N
PREPARE FOR DRA9FTING
IN WASHTENAW COUNTY
REGISTRAR A. G. HALL SUPER-
VISES REGISTRATION
OF MEN
Registrar Arthur G. Hall has been
appointed by the Washtenaw county
committee that has charge of registra-
tion of persons subject to the selective
draft to supervise registration under
the draft on the campus. The Washte-
naw county committee' was appointed
by Governor A. E, Sleeper.
Dr. Hal' will register all male stu-
dents within the prescribed ages who
are citizens of the United States. Cards
will be printed for this purpose and
all students subject to call will be
required to fill them out.
A census will be taken of all men
on the campus who are liable to be
called out under the act of congress
despite the locality of their home city.
The cards when filled out will be
sorted into lots containing names of
studen's living in Washlenaw county,
students living in other parts of Mich-
igan, and students living in othert
states. Then if the men are to be
called from their home city the cards
will be forwarded there.

ITARY SPIRIT
RULES AT SMOKER
AND WAR LECTUR
SHOW SIX REELS OF PICTURE
OF BRANCHES OF
SERVICE
U. S. ARMY OFFICERS
SPEAK AT MEETINGS
Prof. I. C. Sadler Discusses Subma-
nine Menace; Warfare May Be
Brought to America
Military matters reigned supreme
last night with members of the en
gineering college, beginning at T
o'clock in Hill auditorium with six
reels of motion pictures and a lecture
on army life by Major M. J. Phillips
and concluding with a smoker at the
Union.
Major Phillips was a member of
General Kirk's staff of the Michigan
national guard, and is at present sec-
rotary of the war preparedness board.
The motion pictures were both inter-
esting and instructive, showing the
mobilization aL Grayling, and the var!-
ous branches of the service in action.
Infantry, cavalry, and signal corps
flashed busily across the screen.
From Hill auditorium the engineers
departed for the Union to swell the
already assembled throng in the big
Union dance hall. Don E. Smith, 17E,
as master of the ceremonies, intro-
dluced the speakers.
Major C. W. Castle, U. S. A., spoke
on the relation of voluntary drill on
the campus to actual service in the
field.
Pof. Herbert C. Sadler of the ma-
rine engineering department asserted
that unless the United States quickly
ame forward with ships to replace
those detroyed by the submarne
menace, the underseas craft of the cen-
tral powers would very soon cut off
America from the rest of the world,
and marine warfare would be carried
to her very doors.
Major C. A. Vernon of Ann Arbor,
veteran of three wars, addressed h
engineers, giving them bits of sond
advice and wishing them success In
their future military undertakings.
Cercle FraGncais
Initiates Today
Society to Take in .l New Members
at Banquet at Delta To-
.' night
Cercle Francais will initiate 21 new
mem:b:ers when the society banquets
at 7 o'clock tonight at the Delta cafe.
Members of the French faculty and
their wives will be guests of the so-
ciety.
Following the banquet, speeches
will be delivered by Prof. Edward L.
Adams, director of the Cercle, Prof.
Arthur G. Canfield, Lloyd. Curby, '19L,
Adele Crandall, '17, and Ludwig Kui-
jala, '19. L. S. Thompson, '18, will act
as toastmaster. An infor' I ance
will conclude the event.
Secretaries Attend Western Meeting
Secretary Shirley W. Smith has left
with Mr. J. C. Christensen, assistant
secretary and purchasing agent, to at-
tend the annual meeting of business
officers of middle west universities to
take place tomorrow and Saturday at

the University of Minnesota.
Consider Applications for Farms Today
Applications of students who wish
to leave the University to work on
farms will be considered by the mili-
tary trainig and service committee
which meets this afternoon.

Nominees for Offices to Be Voted
On All-Campus Election Friday
The following men, nominees for the Union, will be voted upon
Friday, May 11, the regular campus election day:
PRESIDENT-C. W. Fischer, '18, J. D. Hibbard, '18E.
RECORDING SECRETARY-G. C. Andrews, '18, H. E. Braun, '19L,
H. C. L. Jackson, '18, R. T. McDonald, '18, R. R. Winslow, '19L.
LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENT-A. G. Gabriel, '18, A. G. Ippel, '18, C.
W. Neumann, '18, R. C. Patterson, '18, E. Wunsch, '18.
ENGINEERING VICE-PRESIDE NT - S. S. Attwood, '18E, H. W. Col-
lins, '18E, W. S. Dinwiddie, 18F, E. G. Dudley, '18E, W. M. Mc.-
Kee, 'ISE.
LAW VICE-PRESIDENT-G. F. Hurley, '18L, L. E. Joslyn, '19L, W.
D. Nance, '19L, G. L. Ohrstrom, '19L.I
MEDICAL VICE-PRESIDENT---J. F. Darnall, '181, R. t1. McKean,
'18M, T. L. Tolan, '184,
CQMBINED DEPARTMENTS VICE-PRESIDENT - D. L. Xibehell,
,18D, J. L. Powers, '18P.
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES FOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS -
Dean Henry M. Bates, Prof. William A. Frayer, Dr. Reuben
Peterson.
The following men, nominees for athletic managerships, will be
voted upon Friday, May 11, the regular campus election day:
FOOTBALL MANAGERS-Chas. F. Boos, '18, Leland N. Scofield, '19L.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-DeForest W. Buckmaster, '19, John D.
Cameron, '19, Alfred Mason, '19, Donald 1. Springer, '19E, Robert
L. Storrer, '19E, Harlon N. Walker, '19, William D. Craig, '19,
Matthew S. Towar, 019.
BASEBALL MANAGERS-Stephen G. Pratt, '18E, Jasper B. Reid, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, Clark Bishop, '19,
Robert Daugherty, '19, Sherman Fitz-Simons, '19E, Austin Mar-
mon. '19, Frederick B. Lyons, '19, Donald Yerkes, '1.), Arthur E.
Zigler, '19.
TRACK MANAGER-Eldridge Dudley, '1SE, Frederick J. Thieme,'18E.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-J. C. Finn, '19, F. S. Sanders, '19E, James H.
Clarke, '19, P. 0. Avery, '19, G. B. Pearson, '19, L. L. Matthews,
'19, Carl Rash, '19, Harry Cossett, '19.
INTERCOLLEGE MANAGER-Arthur T. Heuer, '18, Carl Neu-
ann, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-John 1). Watts, '18, George Codd, '20, Harry
M. Carey, '19.
The following men, campus at large nominees for the Student
council, will be voted upon Friday, May 11, at the regular campus
election day:
Chester W. Clark, '18, Robert T. McDonald, '18, Clarence A. Hart,
'18E, Alan V. Livingston, '18E, Rollin R. Winslow, '19L, and
Ernest L. Zeigler, '19L.
1918 MEDICS-E. C. Baumgarten, C. A. Bosworth.
1918 PHARMICS-E. R. Crandall, H. B. McWilliams.
1918 HOMOEOPS-L. J. Boyd, Edward C. Stebbins, C. S. Emery.
1918 LITS-H. C. L. Jackson, G. A. Reem.
1918 DENTS--H. C. Cramer, F. H. Tinsman.

Spanish Club Holds First Meeting
An entire program rendered in
Spanish, and a business meeting car-
ried on in that tongue will distinguish
the first regular meeting of El Ataneo
Cervantes, the club recently formed by
students in the Spanish department
held qt 8 o'clock tonight in Lane hall.

* ALL CLASSES TO PAY FOR
NEW ROPE FOR TUG-OF-WAR
Bills for the new tug-of-war
rope to take the place, of the old
Sone which was destroyed last year,
have been sent out to the treas-
urers of the classes on the cam-
pus. Money for the rope must be
in very -shortly if the tug-of-War
" contest is to be held as usual this
* year.
*

*
'(C
*
:*

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