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May 08, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-08

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E WEATHER
1R-CONTINUED
COOL TODAY

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NI%-IT
WIRE SERVICE

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I -.

VOL. XXVII. No. 153. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 8, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT

SENIORS-JUNIORS
ASSEMBLE TODAY
Upper Classes of Literary College to
Organize for Military Train-
ing
PLAN TO PLACE REGIMENT
OF LITS ON FERRY FIELD
Sophomores and Freshmen Meet To-
morrow, According to New
Arrangement
The first of a series of meetings to
be held by the classes of the literary
college this week to make plans for
the definite organization of military
training in the college will be held at
5 o'clock this afternoon in University
Hall.
In order to speed up the military
work and save two days time, it has
been decided that both the senior and
junior classes will meet at this time,
while' the sophomores and freshmen
will meet tomorrow at 5 o'clock. The
former plan was to have each class
meet on a separate day of the week.
The present plan, as formulated by
the military committee, are to place
an entire literary regiment on Ferry
field to drill with the engineers and
laws as soon as possible. Drills will
be held every afternoon, if possible.
The time of drill and other details
are yet to be determined.
The committee in charge of the
meetings is composed of Major C. W.
Castle, Dean John R. Effinger, Prof.
Jesse S. Reeves, and Prof. S. L. Bige-
low.
ENINEERS FORM FIRST
EXPEDITIONARY FORCE

Triangles Take
in"o Neophytes
Junior Engineering honorary Society
Holds Initiation Banquet
at Union
Ten engineers attracted much at-
tention yesterday by standing for
hours in the engineering arch in
strange apparel. Those who knew
were able to say that this was the
spring initiation of Triangles, junior
engineering honorary society.
The new Triangles are: Robert L.
Biggers, W. R. Cruse, W. H. Dorrance,
R. A. Haigh, H. H. Horwitz, E. M.
Miller, C. W. Porter, C. M. Sparks, Rex
St. Clair, and C. T. VanDusen.
The initiation banquet was held at
the Union. Norman Ibsen, '18E, acted
as toastmaster, calling for, speeches
from the following: C. A. Hart, '18E,
H. A. Taylor, '17E, C. M. Sparks, '19E,
Prof. A. E. White, and Prof. J. A.
Bursley.
Prof. J. G. Callan of the University
of Wisconsin was the guest of the
evening.
MOVIES TO ILLUSTRU TE
PROBLEMS OF SALESMAN

E.

S. BABCOX OF FIRESTONE
COMPANY, TO EXPLAIN
PICTURES

WAR DEPARTMENT ISSUES
DERS FOR RAISING NINE
REGIMENTS

OR-

Washington, May 7.-The war de-
partment issued orders late today for
the raising of the first American forces
to be sent to France. The first ex-
peditionary force to set foot on French
soil will be. a large number of the
engineer corps. The orders provided
for the raising of nine additional regi-
ments of engineers who will proceed
to France "at the earliest possible
moment for work on the lines of com-
munication."
Use Volunteer System
Recruiting points for these nine
regiments will be New York, Chicago,
Pittsburg, Detroit, Alanta, San Fran-
cisco, Boston, and Philadelphia. The
war department made the following
official comment in connection with its
announcement.
The nine regiments which will be
raised by the volunteer system, are
additional to any troops thus far men-
tioned. Authorization for obtaining
these men is granted under the na-
tional defense act which permits of
recruiting added units for special serv-
ice such as engineering, aviation, and
the like.
Work Behind First Line Trenches
Two officers of the regular army
will- be attached to each regiment of
engineers. The work of the expedi-
tionary force will be 'done close be-,
hind the first line trenches. Their
task will be working on the rail lines
of communication which are frequent-
ly blasted or wrecked by shell fire.
Many of the men will be recruited
from the ranks of railroad men. No
man without requisite technical
knowledge will be accepted.
Require Fewer Officers
Army men who have been opposed
to the Roosevelt division idea hope
that the sending of the engineers will!
quiet the demand for a Roosevelt con-
tingent. The engineers will require
only 18 regular army officers to head
them, and hence the one big objection
to the Roosevelt idea will be over-
come, namely, that the regular army
would be depleted of officers for train-
ing purposes.
MAJOR WRIGHT TO ADDRESS
CLASS IN MILITARY WORK
Major Wright, U. S. A., of the en-
gineering corps, will speak to students
in the course of elements. of military
engineering in Hill auditorium at 7
o'clock tomorrow night. All men tak-
ing the course are urged to be pres-

"The Link," a four reel motion pic-
ture illustrating the development of
a saleman as conceived by the Fire-
stone Tire and Rubber company, will
be shown at 7:30 o'clock tonight in
the auditorium of the Natural Science
building. E. S. Babcox, advertising
manager for the Firestone company
will deliver an explanatory lecture in
connection, and talk on the relation-
ship existing between the salesman
and advertising man.
The film has been shown before
sales conventions and advertising
meetings all over the country. It
deals with the problems that confront
the new salesman and the stumbling
blocks he must overcome before suc-
cess can be attained.
This lecture will be the last of the
series planned by the Tryads for the
benefit of the 400 students of the Un-
iversity taking advertising and selling
courses. No admission will be
charged.
OBJECTS TO EMBARGO
Tmvnsend Opposes Device Attempting
'lo Coerce Neutrals
Washington, May 7.-That this coun-
try by the use of an embargo will
try to coerce neutral countries into
participation in the war was the dec-
laration of Senator Townsend of
Michigan late this afternoon. He an-
nounced he would not support the
embargo section.
"The course we propose to take now
is going to intensify this war," he
said. "It will line up nations against
us who are now friendly." Senator
LaFollette of Wisconsin then intro-
duced an amendment prohibiting the
use of the embargo to coerce any na-
tion into the war.

MDAME DPRIEZ
TALKS N BELGIUM
"What Has Happened in Belgium"
Subject of Speech To-
night
GOVERNOR ALBERT E. SLEEPER
TO PRESIDE AT MASS MEETING
Naval Militia, Ambulance Unit and
Training Corps Will March
to Auditorium
With the purpose of presenting to
the students of Michigan the present
condition of the Belgian people, a
mass meeting will be held at 8 o'clock
this evening in Hill auditorium, at
which Governor Albert E. Sleeper will
preside, while Madame Dupriez, wife
of Prof. Dupriez, late of the Univer-
sity of Louvain, and now of Harvard,
will be the principal speaker. Her
subject will be, "What Has Happened
in Belgium," and will be illustrated
with lantern slides.
The naval militia, the ambulance
unit, and the military training corps
will assemble at Waterman gymnas-
ium at 7 o'clock, and from there,
headed by the band, will proceed to
the auditorium. During the program
the women of the University will pre-
sent a silk flag to the recently organ-
ized ambulance corps. The band will
furnish a program of French and
American national songs.
The first balcony will be reserved
for the women, who will attend the
meeting in a body. A special seat sec-
tion will be reserved for the military
and ambulance units.
The meeting takes place under the
auspices of the Student council, the
Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A., the Wom-
en's league, and the Michigan Union.
It will be open to the public, and no
pledges or collection will be taken.
RECEIVE $300 FOR
AMBULANCE CORPS
First Contributions Come from Mr.
Henry W. Douglas and
Mrs. Douglas
First contributions to the Michigan
ambulance corps were received yester-
day from Henry W. Douglas, '90E, of
Ann Arbor to the amount of $200, and
from Mrs. Henry W. Douglas for $100.
All checks should be made payable to
Thomas F. McAllister, '18, treasurer,
607 South State street.
Twenty-five men have signed up for
the first unit which will sail June 2
for Bordeaux, France. A second unit
will be organized if sufficient interest
is manifested. Thirty-five students
have signified their intention to loin
the second corps.
CERCLE FRANCAIS Tq HOLD
BANQUET THURSDAY EVENING
Members of Cercle Francais will
meet socially for the last time this
year at a banquet to be held at 7
o'clock Thursday evening at the Delta
cafe. The event will constitute the
initiation into the organization of a
number of students proficient in
French, including all those who took
part in the French play who were
not previously initiated.
Following the banquet the members
will be addressed in French by Prof.
Edward L. Adams and Prof. Arthur G.
Canfield. An informal dance will con-
clude the event. All Cercle members
who will be able to attend should in-
form Marie Cornwell or Leland

Thompson at the earliest possible mo-
ment.
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB OFFICERS
WILL BE NOMINATED TONIGHT
Nominations for next year's officers
of the Cosmopolitan club will be in
order at a meeting to be held at 7
o'clock this evening in room 301 Uni-
versity hall.
Another meeting will be held at 7
o'clock Thursday evening in room 301
University hall at which the election
will take place. Nominations will be
announced in Wednesday's Daily.
Senior Lits Pay for Invitations Today
Today is the last opportunity given
to senior literary students to pay for
their invitations to the Commencement
exercises. The money will be receiv-
ed this afternoon from 1 to 5 o'clock
in the Library.,

Alhletic

The following men, nominees for the Union, will be voted upon
Friday, May 11, the regular campus electiop day:
PRESIDENT-Glenn M. Coulter, '1SL, C. W. Fischer, '18, J. D. ilib-
bard, '1SE, A. A. Schupp, '17E.
RECORDING SECRETARY-C. C. Andrews, '18, H. E. Braun, '19L,
H. C. L. Jackson, '18, R. T. McDonald, '18, I. R. Winslow, '19L.
LITERARY VICE-PRESIDENT-A. G. Gabriel, '18, A. G. Ippel, '18, C.
W. Neumann, '18, R. C. Patterson, '18, E. Wunsch, '18.
ENGINEERING VICE-PRESIDENT-S. S. Attwood, '1SE, H. W. Col-
lins, '18E, W. S. Dinwiddie, '1SE, E. G. Dudley, '18E, W. M. Mc-
Kee, '18E.
LAW VICE-PRESIDENT-G. F. Hurley, '18L, L. E. Joslyn, '19L, W.
D. Nance, '19L, G. L. Ohrstrom, '19L.
MEDICAL VICE-PRESIDENT-J. R. Darnall, '18M, R. M. McKean,
9183f, T. L. Tolan, '18M.
COMBINED DEPARTMENTS VICE-PRESIDENT - D. L. Mitchell,
'1819 J. L. Powers, '18P.
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVES FOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS-
Dean Henry M. Bates, Prof. William A. Frayer, Dr. Reuben
Peterson.
The following men, nominees for athletic managerships, will be
voted upon Friday, May 11, the regular campus election day:
FOOTBALL MANAGERS-Chas. F. Boos, '18, Leland N. Scofield, '19L.
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-DeeForest W. Buckmaster, '19, John D.
Cameron, '19, Alfred Mason, '19, Donald M. Springer, '19E, Robert
L. Storrer, '19E, Harlon N. Walker, '19, William D. Craig, '19,
Matthew S. Towar, '19.
BASEBALL MANAGERS-Stephen G. Pratt, '1SE, Jasper B. Reid, '19.,
ASSISTANT MANAGERS-Ferdinand C. Bell, '19, Clark Bishop, '19,
Robert Daugherty, '19, Sherman Fitzsimons, '19E, Austin Har-
mon, '19, Frederick B. Lyons, '19, Donald Yerkes, '19, Arthur E.
Zigler, '19.
TRACK MANAGER-Eldridge Dudley, '18E, Frederick J. Thieme, '18E.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-J. C. Finn, '19, S. S. Sanders, '19, James H.
Clarke, '19, P. 0. Avery, '19, G. B. Pearson, '19, L. L. Matthews,
'19, Carl Rash, '19, Harry Cosset, '19.
INTERCOLLEGE MANAGER-Arthur T. Heuer, '18, Carl Neu-
mann, '18.
ASSISTANT MANAGER-John D. Watts, '18, George Codd, '20, Harry
M. Carey, '19.
ANNUAL SENIOR SWING ENGLISH LBOR CHIEFS
SET FORWARD TO MAY 14r OFFER! AMERICA ADICE

Nominees for Union and

Ianagers hip

AMBULANCE UNIT
STARTS TOMORROW
AS 'FIGHTING MEN'
SUPPLY 11RANCH WILL ATTEMPT
TO SEND 45 MEN EACH
WEEK
TO CARRY MUNITIONS
TO FRENCH FIGHTERS
Work of Carrying Munitions Regard.
ed as highly Important and
Dangerous
Paris, May 7.-A unit of Americans
who will be officially classified as
"fighting men" will begin work at the
front Wednesday, carrying munitions
to French fighters. A. P. Andrews, .in
charge of the American ambulance
corps, made this announcement today.
Organize Supply Branch
Andrews indicated that the work of
carrying munitions to the French
fighters was being organized as a sep-
arate branch of the American ambul-
ance corps, and that hereafter at-
tempts would be made to send a unit a
week (45 men) to the front in such
service. French army trucks will be
used for the transports. Heretofore,
the American ambulance corpamhas
confined its activities to furnishing
merely non-combatant forces to the
French army.
Are Actual Fighting Forces
With the organization of the mun-
itions supply branch, however, the
Americans enter the scope of co-
operating in actual fighting forces.
The work of carrying munitions for-
ward is one frequently frought with
great danger. Such supply trains are
always sought for by German guns and
the uninterrupted flow of munition to
the fighting men in the trenches is of
the utmost importance.
SENIORS NOMINATE
PARDEE AND CHURCH
Elect President Tomorrow; Jicking
Without Opposition for
Treasurer
Earl E. Pardee, '17, and Conrad N.
Church, '17, were selected as candid-
ates for president of the senior lit
class at the nominations held yester-
day afternoon. C. M. Jickling, '17, Was
nominated for class treasurer with
no opposition. The election will be
held from 2 to 5 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon in the Library.
The class treasurer reported $800 in
the treasury. No other business was
transacted.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE SENDS WIRE
TO SECRETARY OF WAR BAKER

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS TO
VISIT CANADIAN

STUDENT COUNCIL CHANGES DATE
AND PLANS FOR ELEC-
TION DAY
Preparations for all-campus election
day, Friday, May 11, and senior Swing-
out, which takes place the following
Monday, May 14, were decided upon
at the Student council meeting Sun-
day afternoon. The council also voted
to co-operate with the Belgian relief
committee together with the Union,
the Women's league, the Y. M. C. A.,
and the Y. W. C. A.
The campus balloting will take
place from 7:30 to 6:30 o'clock Fri-
day in front of the Library If 'the
weather is fair or if otherwise in Uni-
versity hall. The organizations rep-
resented will be the Michigan Union,
the Student council at large, the board
in control of student publications, the
Athletic association, and the engineer
honor committee. Class student coun-
cilmen will also be elected at that
time.'
Class nominations will be held this
week before Friday.
The date for senior Swing-out has
been advanced two days to May 14,
because so many seniors are planning
to leave school. All seniors are urged
to make preparations for securing
their caps and gowns as soon as pos-
sible.
'20 ASSEMBLY OFF
-Fresh Lits Not to Meet This After-;
noon as Scheduled
Due to the absence of the principal1
speakers for the occasion, the fresh
lit assembly which was scheduled for;
this afternoon has been postponed.,
The assembly will be combined with;
the freshman meeting announced by
the faculty for Friday afternoon to be,
held in University Hall.
Dean John R. Effinger, who has been,
conferring with President Harry B.,
Hutchins and Major Charles W. Castle,
promises something of vital import-
ance to the freshmen. It is therefore;
urged that every member of the fresh-
man class be present at the meeting
Friday afternoon.
Cornell Designated AviatIohn School
Ithaca, N. Y., May 7.-Cornell has
been designated one of the six institu-
tions in the country to establish train-
ing in aviation under the government.

WANT U. S. TO AVOID COSTLY MIS-
TAKES EXPERIENCED BY
ENGLAND
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspoident.)
Washington, May 7.-Labor chiefs
of two nations representing millions
of workers today took up the problem
of turning England's costly labor mis-
takes into a guide chart for the United
States. In the first of a, series of con-
ferences the labor mission sent by
England met today with labor leaders
of this country.
The English mission was headed by
Honorable C. W. Bowermai, privy
councellor, member of the house of
commons, and secretary of the British
Trades Union congress. Samuel Gbm-
pers, president of the American Feder-
ation of Labor, and chairman of the
labor committee of the council of na-
tional defense, lead the American dele-
gation.
Avoid Costly Labor Errors
All of the vast experience and know-
ledge of handling labor in war time
was placed at the disposal of the Am-
erican government by the Britishers.
"We are laying before your govern-
inent through the labor committee of
the council all we have learned in the
last two years of bitter experience
about directing organized labor in
time of war," said Bowerman. "Amer-
ica can avoid all of our errors and
start right. We hope also to bring
about a better understanding between
labor. of England and labor of your
country."
Three aims were today formally out..
lined as the object of the visit here,
as follows: to knit the organized labor
of the United States and England to-
gether for closer co-operation during
and after the war, to guide the Unit-
ed States around the mistakes of Eng-
land, and to aid the United States gov-
ernment to get the best results out of
organized labor.
U. S. May Adopt Priority System
That the United States may adopt
the English system of "priority" for
speeding up work on material was
forecast by one labor leader after the
conference. Under this system any
material in any stage of manufacture
which is to be used for war purposes
is given priority over other work. By
this method the government does not
commandeer factories nor direct labor,
but attains the same results.

PLANT

A party of chemical engineers will
cross the Canadian border Saturday
for the first time since the outbreak
of the European war. Prof. A. H.
White of the chemical engineering de-
partment, will take junior engineers
across to visit the plant of the Canad-
ian Salt company in Windsor.
The electrolytic method of manu-
facturing chlorine and soda will be ob-
served at the Canadian plant in the
afternoon. In the morning a visit will
be made to the works of the Detroit
Chemical company, where nitric and
sulphuric acids are manufactured.
The party will start at 7 o'clock
Saturday morning and expects to re-
turn the same evening.
South American Union Meets Tonight
Members of the South American
union will hold a meeting at 7:15
o'clock this evening in Lane hall.
There are to be two speakers and fol-
lowing their talks an impromptu mu-
sical program will be rendered. This
is the second meeting of the union and
all members are requested to be pres-
ent.

At its regular meeting held yester-
day afternoon in Newberry hall, the
Michigan Women's League for Con-
structive Service heard the report of
the committee which interviewed Dr.
Victor C. Vaughan after his 'return
from Washington and resolved to send
the following telegram to Secretary of
War Baker:
"We heartily endorse the report
made by the committee of physicians
headed by Doctor Vaughan regarding
the prohibition of liquor and prostitu-
tion within an effective zone about
army camps. We trust that the report
will be adopted in its entirety."
DR. OTTO KRESS LECTURES
ON "PULP AND PAPER WORK"
Dr. Otto Kress will lecture on
"Pulp and Paper Wbrk at the Forest
Products Laboratory" at 11 o'clock
this$iorning in room 303 Chemistry
building.
The speaker will visit the pulp and
paper laboratory of the department of
chemical engineering before deliver-
ing his lecture.
TOASTMASTERS TO BANQUET
AT CATALPA INN THURSDAY
Members of Toastmasters' club will
banquet at 6 o'clock next Thursday
evening at the Catalpa Inn to bid bare-
well to John C. B. Parker, '17, and
Harold Fitzgerald, '17, who are soon
to leave for officers' reserve training
camps. At the same time, Prof. H. R.
Cross of the fine arts department will
be initiated into the society.

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