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October 15, 1916 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ATTLES

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BOTH TEAMS PLAY TERY
RAGED GAE THROUGHOUT
Neither Side in Particular Danger
From Scores; Fresh Lose Best
Chance to Count
Michigan State Normal, known in
local circles as Ypsilanti, duplicated
their performance with the 1915 All-
Fresh of last year when they held
McGinnis' verdants to a scoreless tie.
Penalties and fumbling on both
sides of the scrimmage line cut off
several opportunities for counters.
Both sides suffered almost equally
from Referee Sampson's whistle.
The best chance the freshmen had
to score was brought about by the in-
fliction of a 15-yard penalty to the
Normals. This placed the oval on
Ypsi's 5-yard line where Hole kicked
to the 27-yard stripe. The fresh lost
five yards when a lineman got over-
anxious. Ginnebach then lugged the
leather seven yards, and Barber dove
to the 22-yard line. Here with three
yards to gain on the fourth down, a
forward pass rolled over the goal and
the opportunity was gone.
Knox began the game in reality
when he recovered a fumbled punt on
Ypsi's 28-yard line. Dunbrook, who
starred throughout the game, nailed
Ginnebach for a 3-yard loss. "Bill"
Edwards, who played on the soph lits
last year, split the line for 10 stripes
before Shadford was compelled to
punt. West then cleared 11 more by
turning right end just before the half
ended.
In the second half the yearlings
worked several passes but were al-
ways stopped before they got within
scoring distance. Barber began tear-
ing the line to shreds aided by some
big holes opened by Lambert and Cul-
ver, West also did some effective
work, while Ginnebach, helped wear
down the Yps forwards. Weadock
finally punted to Barnes, who was
dropped in his tracks by Elmer Cress.
Edwards made five by circling the
end, but failed through Culver. Hole
kicked over the fresh goal. West
thereupon lugged the ball to the 29-
yard line, and cleared five more
through center.
Barber then did some more plough-
ing, and the game ended with the
freshmen rushing the ball to Ypsi's
32-yard line.
The lineup and summary:
Freshmen (0) Ypsilanti (0)
Elmer Cress.. L.E........Dunbrook
Chapman .......L.T........Hammond
Earl Cress .......L.G.......... Tutant
Lambert ...,.....C.......Longnecker
Fortune ..........R.G.........Sherzer
Culver.........R.T......,.....Reed
Knox ........R.E..........Adrian
Weadock.........Q.........Shadford
Barber ..........L.H..........Barnes
Ginnebach ......R.H.........Edwards
West ...........F............;Wison
Score by quarters-
1 2 3 4 Final
Freshmen ......... 0 0 0 0 0
Ypsilanti.........0 0 0 0 0
Substitutions: Freshmen - Fried-
meyer for Fortune. Ypsilanti-Price
for Tutant, Mitchell for Price, Hole
for Shadford, Crane for Wilson.
OT H GRR SULTS
West

CAN YOU I
Football must be one of those games
that isn't played, out in the country.
It probably is regular, metropolitan
pastime that is enjoyed only by city
folks, and must be played to the ac-
companiment of roaring traffic and
rushing street cars.
You're wrong, we're not trying to
kid Ann Arbor!
Or, ,on the other hand, the great
American college game probably is
one that the feminine mind doesn't
grasp. The vast complication of plays,
the smashing rushes, the long end
runs, probably don't mean a thing to
the young lady who gasps at the right
time and then shrieks with delight
when "Wallie" Niemann grabs a
fumble.
Referee-Paul B. Sampson (Spring-
field). Umpire-Armstrong (Ypsi-
lanti). Head linesman-Robbins (Mich-
igan).
Time of quarters-10 and 7 1-2 min-
utes.
MORE MEN WANTED FOR &U,0
With Syracuse Meet Only Two Weeks
Off and Only 20 Men Out,
Choice Is Narrow.
More men are wanted for cross
country. The meet with Syracuse is
but two weeks away and Coach Far-
rell has only 20 men to work with.
Substracting the freshmen from the
total, there is left a squad of about
14 from which to select the Varsity
team. Inasmuch as the team that
runs against the Orangemen will con-
sist of ten men, there is mighty little
latitude allowed the coach in picking
his team.
The competition this year is the
best ever offered the hill-climbers, two
meets having already been scheduled
and another one being under consid-
eration by the athletic office. In face
of this increased inducement, the
squad this year is smaller than ever
before. Practice runs are to be held
every afternoon this week at 4 o'clock
and all men who desire to try out
are urged to report to Coach Farrell
at this time.
There is a possibility that an all-I
fresh team will be formed if enough
interest is shown to warrant such a
move and all first year men wishing
to work out are requested to report at
the same time as the Varsity squad.
AMBULANCE DRIVER HIGHLY
COMMENDED FOR HIS WORK
Washington, Oct. 14.-For courage-'
ously driving a motor ambulance
through fire-swept zones and exposing
himself to enemy fire while succoring
the wounded, Chaplai Le Roy N. Tay-
lor, U. S. Navy, has been highly com-
mended in a report just received from
Colonel J. H. Pendleton, commanding
the expeditionary force of United
States Marines operating in Santo
Domingo.
In a letter to the Navy department,
Major General George Barnett, com-
manding the United States Marine
Corps, officially expressed his admir-
ation for the coolness and daring dis-

MAGINE IT?
-By The Dictaphone
Maybe you aren't so far off this time
--perhaps we are trying to kid the
girls!
There was three of them-they were
talking it over with just heaps of sat-
isfaction as they were going through
the gate. "Wasn't it wonderful-isn't
Freddie Rehor graceful?" that's the
way they were reviewing the battle.
And then that one spoke up-she had
really favorably impressed us, too.
You know the feminine drawl-yeah
that's the way she said it! And this is
what she said: "Well, who won?"
Editor's note: The opening para-
graph is the only excuse we could
think of for the young lady's ignor-
ance of the gridiron game.
Put Out Twice He
Finally Doffs Cap
Spectators at the Mount Union game;
yesterday, seated in the south stand,:
were enlivened by an impromptu box-
ing contest that resulted from the re-
fusal of-a freshman to doff his year-
ling headgear when passing in front
of the stands. Unheeding the cries
that greeted him from all sides, the
youngster proceeded along the stadi-
um, until his cap was removed for
him. The freshman-his name will
not be mentioned for obvious reasons
-expressed his gratitude to the upper-

I Pop. Mat.
Wed.Best
Seats $0.oo

ARRICK F
DETROIT

Week Oct. x6
Night, Sat. Mat.
25c-5oc-75c-$x
and $1.50

A melee resulted, ending in the ejec-
tion of the impetuous yearling. But
when for the second time he was ob-
served retracing his steps in the stad-
ium, he ware no cap. His classmates
expressed their disapproval of his at-
titude.

Messrs. Shubert Present New York's Favorite Comedian

James T.
Powers

"How BdI
the Little
Bird Know
That?"

classman by a lusty swing1

I I
In a New Farcical Comedy by Mark Swan, Founded on
J. F. Randall's Story of the Same Title
SOMEBODY'S
LUGGAGE
Approved "A Scream of a Splendid
By All Play."- Supporting
New York New York Times. Company
EXTRAORDINARY GRAND OPERA EVENT EXTRAORDINARY
Week Beginning Monday, Oct. 23. Matinees Wednesday and Saturday.
EIGHT COMPLETE AND ELABORATE PRODUCTIONS BY THE
SAN II' A
CARLO GRAND OPERA COMPANY
Most Distinguished and Complete Grand Opera Organization on Tour,
With Twenty World-Famous Stars, Superb Symphony Orchestra,
Large and Brilliant Chorus, Sumptuous Scenic Effects.
NOTE THE ATTRACTIVE REPERTOIRE:
Monday ....................... AIDA Thursday.............LA GIOCONDA
Tuesday.............RIGOLETTO Friday.................LOHENGRIN
Wed. Mat .................. CARMEN Sat. Mat....... .....MARTHA
Wed. Eve........Cavalleria Rusticana Sat. Eve...........IL. TROVATORE
(2) casts) and Pagliacci Musical Director, Sig. Carlo Peroni.
PRICES: soc to $2; Boxes, $2.50; Matinees, Soc to $1.50; Boxes, $2.00.
MAIL ORDERS NOW. REGULAR SEAT SALE NEXT THURSDAY AT 9:00.

to the face.

Big Buick Six Stolen on Norway Road
A big Buick six belonging to Chas.
W. Spooner was stolen between 9 and
10 o'clock yesterday morning while
it was standing in front of his home
at 1824 Norway Road.
Call 600 for expert typewriting.

I IOMi1RR9
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M: A. C., 33; Alma, 0. played by Chaplain Taylor.
Case, 4Q; Kenyon, 0.
Nebraska, 14; Kansas Aggies, 0. [ ililllli1111111111 l111 tI 1 1 1I IIIIlIIf III 11 111111111 C11111111111 1111111111 11111titi 1t 11 1 11 1111111t111111111111|11,
Colgate, 15; Illinois, 3.
Wisconsin, 28; South Dakota, 3.
Ohio State, 128; Oberlin, 0.
Minnesota, 47; North Dakota, 7.
Notre Dames 26; Haskell Indians, 0. -
Chicago, 22; Indiana, 0.
East.-
Cornell, 42; Williams, 0.=
Syracuse, 61; Franklin and Mar-
Swarthmore, 6; Penn, 0.=r
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Harvard, 21; North Carolina, 0.
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