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May 06, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-06

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4

THE WEATHER

FAIR AM) WARMFR
TODAY

.. J"" VP ut ,

Dai1

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

.,._.-.

VOL. XXVII.. No. 162. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 6, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENTS

- ------------ 7

LIT COLLEGE TO
MAE PLANSFOR
MILITARYDRL
ALL CLASSES TO HOLD NEETINGS
EACH AFTERNOON BEGIN-
NING TUESDAY
MAJOR C. W. CASTLE
TO DIRECT TRAINING
Entire Body Will Be Formed Into a
Regiment; Begin Work
at Once
Definite plans for the organization
of all men in the literary college for
military drills were worked out yes-
terday morning by a committee com-
posed of Major C. W. Castle, Dean
John R. Effinger, Prof. Jesse S. Reeves,
and Prof. S. L. Bigelow.
The plan which will go into effect
at once provides for four meetings to
be held at 5 o'clock in University hall
on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday of this week. All men
in the senior lit class will meet on
Tuesday to take part in the organiza-
Military mass meetings for
organizing literary students for
drill will be held at 5 o'clock in
University hall on the follow-
ing days:
Senior lits .............Tuesday
Junior lits......... Wednesday
Sophomore lits......Thursday
Freshman lits..........Friday
tion of a class company. 'he junior
lits will meet on Wednesday afternoon
for the same purpose. Sophomores
will meet on Thursday and freshmen
on Friday.
The meetings will be in charge of
Major Castle, under whose direction
the organization will be effected. All
members of the literary faculty who
have had experience at Plattsburg or
elsewhere are urged to attend and
help in the movement. It is the de-
sire of the committee to bring about
a definite military organization of all
students in the literary college for the
purpose of drill. The entire body will
be formed Ilto a regiment. Military
instruction will begin at once.
The drills will be held on Ferry
field. 'Men of adequate military ex-
perience will be provided. A great
deal can be accomplished before the
end of the semester with the co-opera-
tion of the classes. The hours of drill
and other matters of detail will be de-
cided upon "in 'the meetings.

Carson Second in
Torens ~cContest
Nor tin uiistern 'lTaW an Easy First
It t Maiy Scoolsoinetiiig
hitiners
aGph 1 Carson, '1 , won seCond
place with his cration, "The Scholar
and the Socialist,.' in the Northern
Grattrical league contest n inneap-
ohs l'rday night. Northw estern took
an ('L Y i fat Ceordie to a tele" cam
rci C ed fron C rsoii a cterdjy mjorn-
T i orators coipeting )In the con-
and iin Lt year Nathan
Vime ,',won third place.
The Northu ci ratoria league was
found in 18) and competitions have
been held annually. Michigan has
Son nin e f rst.- Prizes of $100 and $50
are a warded to the wm iners.
AFSIVALBRO&H
TO LOETAS NGH

THE BEAT KIND OF A SUMMER TONIC
FOR YOURSELF-FOR YOUR COUNTRY
44
-~- -
rl--,
0 -
C\ -
c "4,
lC1

Boilermakers Out
for Bloody Quest
Triangles, Junior Engineer Honorary
Society, Initiate Ten Mem-
day Afternoon
With scrubbing brushes and the
pleasant patullations of "big sticks,"
and vitalizing paddles, Triangles,
junior engineer honorary society, be-
gin their spring drive tomorrow after-
noon "under the arch." Ten men will
endeavor to wipe the stains of ob-
loquy, and the blood and footprints
from the ancient brass shrine of the
engineers.

U-BOAT PROBLEM
ANSWER SEEN BY.
BOARDCHAIRMAN

CONd 'u RT

VO-

1y hrank Taber
The twenty-fourth annual May Fes-
tival was brought to a crowning cli-
max when Verdi's "Aida" was given
last eveninginn Hlll auditorium by the
CI"r 1 union, Chicago Symphony or-
chestra, Earl V. Moore, organist, and
the ,following soloists: Margarete
Matzenauer, )e Lu ca, Mar tinelli, Maud
Fay, Holmquist, Lois Johnston, and
Chase B. Sikca, all under the direc-
tion of Dr. Albert A. Stanley.
This i~nnortad opera, with its beau-
tifol solos and stirring choruses, is
wcl1 suited to be given in concert, and
its rendition last evening was, in every
repect, an inspiring one.
y1c M atitue Sings
t ar, with her marvel-
ns. rich and dramatic, mezzo-soprano
tmi. sang the role of "Ameris" and
would te difficult to imagine an ar-
ist better qualified to sing this tax-
ing r ale. lar low tones were rich
ud fll while her high tones were
mai-ingly clear and powerful. Her
intcrprctations were characterized by
emotional feeling 'nd great dramatic
intensity.
Ov log to the absence of Arthur Mid-
ieton, Custaf Iolmquist took both
the roles of "Ramphis" and "The
King," and in each case acquitted him-
self with credit.
u
7 ~7
"'w V I ors atd Ft-
ey 3:a i ahNet Wed-

FRESH LITS WNILL HOLDJ
MILITAYEPMETING
MAJOR CASTLE HAS PROMISED TO
HELP YEARLINGS REOR-
GANIZE
In order to stir up the spirit of the
class with regard to military train-
ing, the fresh lits will hold a military
"I ep' meeting at 4 o'clock on Tues-
day al'ternoon in the auditorium of the
Natural Science building.
Officers of the class have instituted
a new plan for the drill work and will
put it before the class at this time,
with the hope that new interest may be
taken. Major Castle has virtually
promised to assist the class with their
reorganization and will be one of the
speakers at the meeting.
Arrangements have not been com-
pleted as yet, but efforts are being
made to obtain a number of men close-
ly connected with the military situa-
tion at the University to address the
assembly.
BIG LOAN INCREASES
Subscriptions to "Liberty Loan" Reach
$480?,000 Per Minute
Washington, May 5.-At the rate of
$28830,600 an hour, or more than
$480,000 per minute, the rank and file
of America is paying for America's
part in the war to establish world de-
mocracy. Secretary McAdoo tonight
issued a statement giving the total
subscription to the "liberty loan" for
the day at $172,983,000. New York
City headed the list with a total of
$53,000,000, including two offers of
$10,000,000 each.

fSTART BELGIA RELIEF
WORK NEXT TUESDAY
CONCERT-ENTERTAINMENT TO BE
HELD IN HILL AUDI-
TORIUM
To Hill auditorium's long list of
mass meetings for the good of man-
kind will be added one more Tuesday
right, in the nature of starting the
campaign for Belgium relief.
With the Varsity band present, the
probability of Gov. A. E. Sleeper pre-
siing, steroptican views illustrating
the address of one who has seen the
barbaric destruction of the civilization
of Belgium, and a novel flag presenta-
tion], the evening will be in the nature
of a' concert-entertainment.
Madame Dupriez of Cambridge,
Mass., whose husband was formerly a
language professor of Louvaine, has
been secured to give a short talk on
the necessity of relief, showing lant-
ern slides of ruined Belgium cities.
University women will attend in a
body, as will the two divisions of the
Michigan naval reserves, and the
members of the Universities first am-
bulance corps. During the evening a
silken flag will be dedicated to the
corps by University women.
Every student and citizen is invited
to attend. No collection will be made.
Three Eastern Golfers Tied in Meet
Atlantic City, N. J., May 5.-The
qualifying round of the spring golf
tournament of the Atlantic City Coun-
try club resulted in a triple tie, B. W.
Corkran, Baltimore, P. S. P. Randolph,
Jr., Philadelphia, and Maurice Risley,
Atlantic City, each returning a card
of 83. More than 100 players started
in the qualifying round.

LAW STUDENTS TO GET
CREIT FOR ENLISTING
STATE BOARD DECIDES TO ALLOW
TIME FOR WAR
SERVICE
Law students in the state of Michi-
gan who enlit and are accepted in
some branch of the United States serv-
ice, will be allowed such time as they
miss from schol to be applied to the
required time of laW study, according
to resolutions adopted by the Michigan
state board of hw examiners at its
meeting held in Lansing recently.
Satisfactory eidence must be
shown the board t the effect that the
student has enliste before he will be
given the advantages of the resolu-
tions. The board alo has authorized
its secretary to hold at some date in
the future an examination only for
students who have enlisted according
to these resolutions, wich follow:
1. Resolved, That laI students who
enlist and are accepted in any branch
of the United States service (with
the approval of the La# school au-
thorities or of the pre ptor under
whom they are studying), will be al-
lowed on the required tine of law
study such time (not exceeing, how-
ever, two months in any on year) as
they may on account of service for
the country be prevented fro pursu-
ing their law work;
2. That satisfactory evidenc (pre-
ferably by the certificate of the dean
or secretary of the law school o pre-
ceptor), shall be furnished the loard
of a compliance with this resoluton,
and in case of law school students, of
graduation therefrom, before any stu
dent is permitted to avail himself of
the provisions hereof; and
3. That the board for the conveni-
ence of law students who may come
under this resolution, authorizes its
secretary, in his discretion, to call a
special meeting of the board, at such
time and place as may best meet the
purposes of this resolution, for the
examination for admission to the bar
only of students who come under the
provisions hereof.
UNION NOMINATES
1917-1918 OFFICERS
ICOMMITTEE TO CHOOSE MEN AT
TEN O'CLOCK THIS MORN-
ING
Nominations for next year's officers
of the Michigan Union will be made
at 10 o'clock this morning in the
Union by the nominating committee.
In addition, nominations by petition
will be accepted providing they are
presented by 9 o'clock tomorrow at the
Union desk and signed by 25 or more
petitioners. The constitution of the
Union states that all nominations be
made at least four days previous to
the election. -Owing to' the fact that
campus election comes a week early
this spring, and that the sickness of
the Union president delayed some of
the club's business, it has been impos-
sible to open nominations sooner.
The nominating committee, compos-
ed of A. S. Hart, '17, chairman, rep-
resenting the literary college; Arthur
E. Hecker, '17E, the engineering;
George McClure, '17M, the Medical
school; Harry G. Gault, '17L, the Law
school, and Lawrence Heustis, '17P,
the combined colleges, will select its
men today and publish the list from
Tuesday until Friday in The Daily.
Michigan Dames to Elect Officers
The Michigan Dames will hold a

meeting at 7:45 o'clock tomorrow night
at Newberry hall for the annual elec-
tion of officers.

W. L. SAUNDERS OF NAVAL CON.
SULTING COMMITTEE
"HOPEFUL"
EDISON KNOWN TO
BE EXPERIMENTING
No Definite Single Proposal Now in
Hands of Men Chosen to
Make Defense Plans
New York, May 5.-Solution of the
submarine problem is in sight.
While the greatest inventive brains
in the government service were con-
centrated tonight on technical experi-
ment for the eradication of the U-boat
menace, Chairman W. L. Saunders of
the naval consulting board, avowed he
was "hopeful" of an early solution.
In this connection it was definitely
learned that Thomas A. Edison, presi-
dent of the board, has been away from
his laboratory at Orange, N. J., for
three days working on government ex-
periments. It is understood he is on
one of his famous "work Jags," which
frequently result in astonishing dis-
coveries.
No Definite Proposal
"There is no definite single proposal
before the naval consulting board,"
declared Saunders tonight, "but we
have submitted a number of inven-
tions to the navy department. All
have been tested and found practical.
Personally I am hopeful that one of
these or a combination of them, will
prove to be the solution of the sub-
marine problem.
"I am confident that the submarine
peril will be solved by some of the
inventions now before our board,"
Saunders continued. "Of course, this
is my personal opinion. There are 24
members of, the board and sometimes
they all hold different opinions."
Saunders Makes Denial
Saunders denied a statement quot-
ing him as saying the submarine ques-
tion "had been solved."
"It never will be' solved," he as-
serte'd, "until the submarine is elim-
inated. I think the perif right now is
just as serious as ever, but I do be-
lieve the inventions now in our hands
will meet it. The navy department,

NEED COLLEGE MEN $ v
IN TRAINING CAMIS Wt two Unitad States army ma-
jors, and a faculty member as the
Secretary Baker Warns Against Gen- rteakers of the evening, minstrels,
era oement of Students ngs, and vaudeville sketches, the
T d A "War Smoker" next Wednesday even-
owar rmy ug at the Union looms up as the big-
gest raIlitary affair since the battle
Washington, May 5.--The govern- of Ife Mmrnc. at least on the campus.
ment needs college men in officers' Among the speakers secured for the
training camps, Secretary of War occasion, Major Charles W. Castle,
Baker told college presidents assem- ct drill, will
bled here today. Baker said college ante i n of the pres-
education better fits men for training, et von te work to actual maneu-
but he warned against any general n rgulr army l e.
movement of college men toward the Ma Charles A. Wright, U. S. A.,
army. of the army staff of engineers, will de-
Those disqualified physically or too liver an address on the services which
young, he said, can aid thei country a college man (an render to the coun-
best by continuing their courses andym wr of. Herbert.
preparing for different service later. Sadler of the department of naval
Engineering courses, he said, could be
modified to fit men for commissions in1 speak ou several topics of vital
the coast artillery, and the ordnance t st concerning the present m-
departmentry situation. s speech will be
E\iitLsting to those taking the course
Eelements of miitary engineering.
TO GIVE TALKS ON TEC 'liii Carlos ZanellI, '17E, will sing sev-
1ral songs, including the "Marsei-
Talks by various members of the so- heise" and nb war hymns of several
ciety will furnish the program for 'the of the allied nations. Donald A. Smith,
meeting of the Unitarian Students' so- 'lE, will be on hand with his "Senior
ciety, which is to be held at 6:30 Civil Mirmtrels" who have appeared in
o'clock this evening in the parlors of campus productions heretofore under
the church at the corner of State and the name of the Camp Davis songsters.
Huron streets._ Dan D-utts, '1E, will present a skit
The subject of the talks will be of soii s. assisted on the traps and
"Teaching as a Profession," and th d ums by R. D. Pfohl, '20.
speakers will be Ruth- Lenzner, '17, Norman H. Ibsen, 'i8E, is general
Abigail Blackburn, '18, and Rollin C. chairman of the smoker, which is be-
Hunter, '17. The public is cordially kg given under the auspices of the
invited to attend. Engineering society,

Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division, Streets
Communion Service
Lieut. Arthur E. Boak
Speaks to the University Classes at Noon
Young People's Service at 6:30
First Methodist Church
A. W. Stalker, D. D., Minister

however, has authorized no announce-
ment."
CAPTURE FOUR MILES
OF GERMAN LINES
Froich Gain in Storming Teuton
Position Near Lassaux
Hill
Paris, May 5.-French forces have
captured nearly four miles more of
Cerman trenches on the Hindenburg
line, the French official statement an-
iounced tonight. The gain was made
in storming the German position be-
tween Moisy farm, the Lassaux hill,
and the bridges to Soissons during to-
day's fighting.
"On the captured frontage," the war
office said, "our artillery and ma-
chine guns inflicted exceptionally
Leavy losses to the enemy in repelling
counter attacks."
The ground gained formed one of
the most important salients in the
strong German line lying southeast of
Vaux Aillon.
1 Capture 1,800 Prisoners
* Berlin, by way of London, May 5.-
The capture of 1,800 prisoners on the
French front was reported in tonight's
official statement. Thirty-five machine
guns were taken.
"Near Lens and Fresnoy," the state-
ment said, "weak advances by the
enemy failed. The number of English
prisoners reached more than 1,200. Be-
tween the Aisne and Brimont heights
gn attack by four French divisions
broke down, thanks to stout resist-
ance on the part of our soldiers. East
of Neuville the French,, Who :tem-
porarily penetrated our lines, were
driven out. Here they lost 500 pris-
oners and several machine guns."
80 Yale Students to Sail May 26
L New Haven, .Conn., May 5.-Eighty
more Yale students have signified their
intention of joining the Yale ambu-
lance units to sail May 26.

Morning's Subject at 10:30 is "Loyalty"
Evening's Subject at 7:30 is "The Soul's
Harvest.

p. '1.

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