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May 04, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-04

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.1£1*1L..4 4V4'S1R4V171*4\ L_.

HUNilK IUDJ RMIMh
x TO INFLUENCE POLICIS
"U. S. AND SLAV EMPIRE SHOULD)
CO-OPERATE' SAYS PROF.
MEADER
"Russia needs America, and Amer-
ica needs Russia. Both countries rea-
ize this and are striving for a closer
relationship. Russia exerts and will
continue to exert an influence on world
policies, and the United States should
co-operate with her," said Prof. C. L.
Meader of the general linguistics de-
partment yesterday in his lecture, "De-
mocracy in Russia."
In his remarks concerning the real
democracy in Russia, Professor Mead-
er said: "The zemstvos, or elective
township assemblies, are the most ful-
ly organized and most effective of all
the Russian organizations. Their
wide range of activities includes the
levying of 'soldiers, the maintenance
of prisons and courthouses, roads,
medical and charitable institutions, a
mutual insurance bureau, fire depart-
ments, control of taxes and education,
and the development of agriculture,
industry, and trade.
"The peasant family is fundament-
ally a labor organization where each
member does his or her part," con-
tinued the speaker. "The village com-
munes have disappeared since the
passing of crtain laws in 1906. The
government felt that these were labor
unions and should be broken up.
"Contrary to general opinion, the
nobility is democratic," said Professor
Meader. "It does not possess a dis-
tinct class conscience. This is in a
large measure due to the heterogene-
ous origin of its members, for the
nobility contains Muscovites, Lithuan-
ians, and Poles, as well as Slavs. A
few of the nobles are enormously rich,
but a greater part are poor.
"Realism, the most striking char-
acteristic of Russian literature, is but
a manifestation of democracy," added
Professor Meader. "The authors are
representative of every class in the
empire. Russian literature has been
closely identified with legislation, and
was largely instrumental in the eman-
cipation of the serfs in 1861.
"It is unlikely that any reversion to
the old regime will occur," said Pro-
fessor Meader in conclusion. "The
question is how radical the new gov-
ernment will be."
PROF. C. 0. DAVIS WRITES ON
SECONDARY SCHOOL EDUCATION
Traces Growth of the Present-Day
High School, Discussing
Problems
Prof. Calvin 0 Davis of the educa-
tion department is the author of a
book entitled "Pblic Secondary Edu-
cation" recently published by the
Rand, McNally company.
This book treats of the history of
public secondary education in the
United States, dwelling particularly
upon the work done in Michigan along
these lines. In connection with the
early development of education in this
state there are chapters dealing with
early branches in the University of
Michigan, the academy movement, and
the rise and development of the pres-
ent day high school. The legal, social,
and educational problems which gave
impetus to the growth of the latter
institution, and affected its character
are discussed at some length.
At the request of Prof. C. H. Judd of
the University of Chicago, who recent-
ly conducted a school survey in Grand
Rapids, Professor Davis took charge

of the work in all grades above thE
sixth grade, and his findings are cor
tained in the portion of the school
survey published which is devoted to
the secondary schools. Prof. Charles
S. Berry of the education department
is the author of the report on defec-
tive and exceptional students which
also appears in this publication.
RECOMMEND 14 STUDENTS TO
OFFICERS' TRAINING CAMPS
One hundred and forty-five students
have been examined, passed, and rec-
ommended for the reserve officers'
training camps, to open May 14. The
men will be notified, if they are ac-
cepted, by the commanding officers of
the respective camps.
Men enrolling in the officers' reserve
corps will receive pay, probably $100
a month, for the time spent in the
training camps. This is the assur-
ance sent to the Michigan division of
the Military Training Camps associa-
tion from Wharton Clay, executive
secretary, in Washington.
Food Control Secretary Resigns:
London, May 3.-Captain Bathurst,
parliamentary secretary of the food
control department, has tendered his
resignation, according to a report
this afternoon by the Exchange Tele-
graph company.

Draft Engineers
For War Smoker'
With flaring posters and threatening
war bulletins, the first announcements
have appeared on the campus for the
war smoker of the Engineering society
to be held Wednesday, May 9, at the
Union. Among the features of the
evening will be addresses by the of-
ficers of the University military regi-
ments, and a variety of sketches, songs
and vaudeville skits.
Eight hundred tickets are now on
sale by every tenth engineer and with
the conscription notices which have
been passed out it is expected that
every engineer will attend.
VIVIANI THANS U Sa
FOR JOINING FRANCE
TELLS CONGRESS THAT WE HAVE
SWORN TO DO A REPULIC'S
DUTY
Washington, May 3.-France and
America have sworn on the grave of
George Washington, on the death beds
of soldiers killed in the present war,
and on the graves of all European bat-
tlefields to do .a republic's duty of
bringing other countries to independ-
ence, vice-premier Viciani told the
house today from the speaker's ros-
trum.
A free translation of his speech by
Representative Medill McCormick is,
"Never until my dying day shall I
forget the acclamations of the Ameri-
can people. If I do not thank you
adequately it is not because our grati-
tude is lacking, but because the words
with which to express it are insuf-
ficient. We feel that your sympathy
ficient. Wee feel that your sympathy
and your enthusiastic assistance comes
not only from your heart, but from the
jealousy which you have for your
honor. We have seen that you fullfil
not only the obligations of national
'honor but all at once we have seen
unfolded in its charming intimacy the
complexity of the American soul.
American Soul Is Paradox
"When one meets an American he
meets a practical man, living for the
soul the frankness and vivacity of a
affairs of his time, but at the same
time one discover in the American
new life, the strength which comes
from devotion to an ideal, and so, in
that American soul we have before us
the paradox of the combination of the
practical and the ideal.
"There is a parallel between your
cause and ours. You, like ourselves,
carry the mandate of a free people to
maintain certain ideals, to exchange
certain opinions regarding the tre-
mendous problems arising from the
war to the end that two nations may,
side by side, achieve equality, and lib-
erty. Opposed to us is an absolute
monarch who seeks to compel others
to do his will.
"Swear on Grave of Washington"
"If your national hero, George
Washington could rise from his grave
and behold today's war he would him-
self proclaim that after a nation has
created independence it is bound to
defend it before all the world, and not
only to maintain its independence, but
to create also independence for other
nations. We have sworn on the grave
of Washington to fight to the end, but
not only has it been sworn on the
grave of Washington, but also on the
graves of the uncounted soldiers who
have fallen in this war. It has also

been sworn on the death beds of those
who have died in the hospitals of Eu-
rope, and it has been sworn on the
cradles of the newly born. It has been
svorn by every lover of freedom from
the crade to the tomb. It has been
sworn."
COMPULSORY RATIONING SEEMS
INEVITABLE IN GREAT BRITAIN
London, May 3.-"The submarine
menace is formidable, but the cabinet
has calculated on greater wastage in
shipping than has already been ac-
complished," declared Lord. Curzon,
mier ber of the war cabinet today at a
r3eeting in Caxton hall.
"The menace will not affect the ulti-
mate issue of the war," he concluded.
Lord Curzon declared compulsory
Sioning in England was inevitable,
and said the Russian situation was
"still not without anxiety."
RABBI NATHAN KRASS SPEAKS
TO JEWISH STUDENTS SUNDAY
Rabbi Nathan Krass of Brooklyn,
N. Y., will address the Jewish Stu-
dents' congregation at 6:45 o'clock
Sunday evening in Newberry hall. The
topic of his lecture is to be announced
later.

COUNTING STUDENTS
RECEIVE APPOINTMENTS

Are You a Senior?
Pay Diploma Fee

FOUR GRADUATES OF CLASS
MQRE DESIRABLE
POSITIONS

Are you a senior? Then your diplo-
GAIN am fee is payable now.

Three men of the present class in'
financial, artuarial, and statistical ma-
thenatics have received appointments.
and four graduates have been promot-
ed.
llubert B. Sturtevant, '17, has a pos-
ition with the North American Life andt
Casulity Co., of Minneapolis, Minn.;r
Edmund L. Shinnick, '17, with the Mid
land Insurance Co. of St. Paul, Minn.,f
and Alva J. McAndless, '17, with thei
Grange Life Assurance association oft
Lansing.
Ralph R. Lounsbury, '16, who was
instructor in accounting during thei
first semester of the present year, has
been made actuary of the insurance
department of Nebraska and is located
at Lincoln. Volney H. Wells, '16, in-
structor in mathematics for several
years in the University, has been ap-
pointed assistant professor at the Uni-
versity of Pittsburg, and will offer sev-
eral courses in financial, statisical,
and actuarical mathematics in hisanew
position.
Carl Mitteheltree, '16, formerly of
the Cleveland Life Insurance Co., has
been made actuary of the Columbus
Mutual Life Insurance Co., of Colum-
bus, Ohio.
Rolland V. Mothersill, '11, succes-
sively actuary of the Western Union
Insurance Co. and state actuary of
the insurance department of Californ--
ia, has accepted a position as statis-
tician and actuary of the Standard Ac-
cident Insurance Co. of Detroit.
* * ** **4* *.* * ** * * * *
* .*
x AT THE TH EATERS *
* --*
* TODAY *
* - --*
*Majestic-H. B. Warner in "The *
* Danger Trail." *
* _ _*
* Arcade-Harold Lockwood and *
* May Allison in "The Hidden *
* Children." Drew comedy. *
* Orpheum- Blanche Sweet in *
* "Those Without Sin". Bray *
* cartoon. *
* _ *
* Rae-"Brother Officers." Hearst *
* -Pathe Magazine. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * 4' * * * * * * *
. AT THE MAJESTIC
H. B. Warner, the noted actor, has
joined the Selig company and Miss
Violet leming, the popular actress,
has been selected as his new leading
lady. The first drama in Vhic they
will appear is "The Danger Trail." It
is a thrilling drama of the snow coun-
try. Violet Heming was born on the
Isle of Man. She supported George
Arliss and plyed "Rebecca" in "Re-
becca of Sunnybrook Farm." W. Law-
son Butt plays the role of Jean Croi-
sett the half-breed.. Butt is an Eng-
lish actor who created the role of
"Boris" in "The Garden of Allah."
Richard Thornto is another ciever
actor in the drama. "The Danger
Trail" is announced to appear at the
Majestic today.
There is opportunity in The Michi-
gan Daily Ads Read tnem.

Notices to this effect have been post-
ed on the campus, and Secretary Shir-
ley W. Smith is requesting that early
settlement be made in order that the
work on the diplomas may be complet-
ed on time. No student will receive a
diploma unless his fees are paid by 4
o'clock on June 1. This will also ap-
ply to those seeking teacher's diplo-
mas.
All candidates for degrees or teach-
er's diplomas must fill out cards im-
mediately at the office of the secre-
tary of their respective school or col-
lege, and after paying the treasurer
and having their cards receipted, must
file the part designated with their sec-
retary.
The University offices will be closed
on Saturday afternoons, and also on
Decoration day, May 30.
CLARK AGINST PRESS
CENSORSHIP CLAUSE

Freshmen I
Festival,
Miss Christine Miller, A
ton and Gustave Holmq
the only sweet singersa
Ann Arbor last night.
tion they had a company
singing, climbing trees
ing various other stun
managership of a smallr
om ores.
The performance was
interesting stage when t
Hill auditorium dismiss
thousands poured into th

RIDERlESS HRSES IM 50
Upal I RECRUITS IN AUSTRALIA
Artists Sydney, New South Wales, May 3.-
W. M. Hughes, the prime minister of
Morgan Kings-, Australia, addressed a mass meeting
uist were not of 20,000 here this week, appealing for
performing in recruits. While he was speaking some
As competi- troopers of the light horse led intc
y of freshmen, the square 50 horses, without riders
and perform- carrying cloths inscribed: "Who will
its under the fill an empty saddle?"
group of soph- Mr. Hughes pleaded: "You are liv-
ing; you are Australians; your coun-
s at its most try is in danger. God will be witi
the concert at you."
ed and the Within 10 minutes every horse had
.e streets. a rider, and the jangling bits and clat-
ter of hoofs roused the crowd to a

WANTS $7,0009000 MORE FOR
NAVAL TRAINING STATIONS
Washington, May 3.--Declaring navy
enlistments are coming in so fast that
additional training quarters are im-
perative, Secretary Daniels today per-
sonally asked an additional appropria-
tion from congress of $7,000,000 for
naval training stations.

state of intense excitement.
Before the meeting adjourned
larger number of recruits had bee
enlisted than at any similar meetir
this year.
Rugs perfectly cleaned, washed, at
sized without injury. Koch & Henne.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

II

DECLARES PROVISION
FLAT VIOLATION OF
STITUTION

TO
CON.

BE

Washington, May 3.--Speaker Clark
came forward as the leader of the fight
against the censorship clause in the
administration's spy bill when in de-
bate in the house this afternoon he
declared the clause to be a "flat viola-
tion of the constitution."
Violates Constitution
An agreement was reached to limit
debate on the section to four hours.
Speaker Clark opened the discussion.
"I believe the press censorship clause
in this bill to be a flat violation of
the constitution," he said. "The fact
that editors slander people, abuse them
like pickpockets and lie about them
for doing their plain duty-and I have
received as much as anybody of this
in the last 10 days-won't make me
vote for the proposition. The presi-
dent, I believe, will stick by his prom-
ise not to punish anyone for criticizing
the administration, but the president
would not have anything to do with
the enforcement in this act. That
would be left to some subordinate or
rather to a multitude of subordinates."
Representative Medill McCormick of
Chicago, in a statement today an-
nounced he would introduce an amend-
ment to limit the president's power to
suppress news and comment on
"enumerated war matters." "The cen-
sorship section is of most vital and
grave interest to all the people of the
United States," McCormick said. "For
example, I am told there is consider-
able, although not an overwhelming
amount of minor infectious diseases
among the navy recruits.
Attacks Navy Department System
"I hear, too, that Mr. Daniels let
bids for submarine chasers to brokers,
not shipbuilders, and that the brokers
have not been able to secure contracts
for construction or bond for the per-
formance of contracts which they have
made with Mr. Daniels. This section,
at request of the navy depart-
ment, could prohibit discussion of such
matters by congress."
Use the advertising columns of Th4'
Michigan Daily in order to reach th'
best of AnnArbor's buyers.

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WHAT TO WEAR

For most social occasions this summer a coat with, some sort of
belt, and lwhite flannel trousers will be the correct thing. For busi-
ness-trousers to match the coat. Thus one suit and a pair of flannels
is what you need. A
HART, SCHAFFNER & 3A1RX
suit to be exact. They have a breezy, careful style that appeals to
every wan w ho likes the outdoors; and moreover, they are all wool
and really fit. Ask to see the Varsity Fifty-Five designs.

01 Course You are Skeptical
SO WERE WE!
-till we drove them all winter without a hitch; and a score of friends
wanted them, so we took out the agency. Sold $1,700 worth last month,
and every customer satisfied.
To show you, in smite of your doubt,
WE WILL TAKE THE RISK!
USE
GATES' HALF
SOLE ]I
30 days, and then if for any reason you are not satisfied, drive your
car to our service station; we will remove them and refund every cent
you paid for them.
And a $3,000,000 concern guarantees them
PUNCTURE PROOF
3,500 Miles
"A solid summer of safety," and for 51% less than the average
price of five leading makes of tires.
Call 432-M
Our Representative will Call with a Demonstrator
The I-R-S Co.
International Rubber Sales Co.
W. F. LETTS, Manager
Phone 432-3M Office: 113 S. Main St.
Service Station: 818 S. -1ain St.
SOLE AGENTS FOR WASHTENAW COUNTY

FURNISHINGS TO ACCOMPANY

Manhattan Shirts

Knox Hats

)Iansco Lightweiglit Underwear
Latest and Brightest Neckwear

Collars

" pap)s to come down town."

The home of Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes at south-wes

corner Washington and Main Sts.

Dancing classes and private lessons
r the Packard Academy. tf

_ , i

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