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May 04, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

HE WEATHER
PROBAIBLY RAIN
TODAY

I
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UNITED PRESS
DIY AND) NIH T
WIRE SERVICE

;I

VOL. XXVII. No. 150. NN A{RBOR, MCHGAN FRIDAY, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN1
1 .r ... ..,... . mu am e++m rxa®o ii'+_ -. Ifl'TflEir iEi fl nl n i

CHRISTINE MILLER,
HLMOVIST, AND
KINGSTON APPEA
SECOND MAY FESTIVAL CONCERT
PRESENTS WORKS OF ED-
WARD ELGAR
LUCY GATES TO TAKE
PLACE OF GALLI-CURC
Children's Chorus, Leginska, and Chi-
cago Symphony to Be heard
Tsis Afternoon
By Frank A. Taber
The second Festival concert, which
%ias given in Hill auditorium last even-
ing, consisted entirely of works of Ed-
ward William Elgar. His Incidental
Musical and Funeral March from
"Grania and Diarmid," Opus 42, which
was played by the Chicago Symphony
orchestra as the first number of the
regular program, is a work of unusual
beauty and charm and was rendered
in a faultless manner.
The principle work, however, was
"The Dream of Gerontius," sung by
the Choral union, the solo parts be-
ing taken by Morgan Kingston, tenor;
Christine Miller, contralto, and Gustaf
Holmquist, bass, accompanied by the
Chicago Symphony orchestra and Earl
V. Moore, organist.
Morgan Kingston Is Gerontius
Mr. Kingston sang the taxing role
of Gerontius and varied the somewhat
narrative quality of the text with
dramatic fevor. His voice is of pleas-
ing quality and proved adequate for
all demands.
ChristinesMiller sang the role of the
Angel and pleased her audience alike
by her artistic interpretation and at-
tractive stage presence. Her voice is
rich and full, and her enunciation
splendid..
Holmquist Sings in Two Roles
Mr. Holmquist sang the roles of the
Priest and the Angel of the Agony and
gave an intelligent interpretation of
each. These roles were better suited
to the range of a baritone and did not
give the singer an opportunity to dis-
play the real bass register of his voice.
The singing of the Choral union in
the first part of the work was some-
what uncertain but in the second part
the singers proved amply capable of
rendering all the tonal lights and
shades in this difficult score.
Musically, the composition is an
excellent one, but owing to its com-
plexity and never ceasing movement,
is an unusually difficult work to listen
to. The points at which the listener
can sit back and relax are all too few,
and the work is not of the type which
appeals strongly to the average list-
ener.
"Consecration" by Choral Union
"The Consecration Hymn," which
was sung before the regular program
by the Choral union, accompanied by
orchestra and organ, was an impres-
sive and effective number.
A varied program will be presented
at the concert this afternoon when the
Children's chorus will sing and
Leginska, pianist, will appear as so-
loist. The Chicago Symphony orches-
tra will play a Mozart symphony.
Lucy Gates Replaces Galli-Curi .
Miss Lucy Gates, coloratura so
prano, has been secured to sing at the
concert this evening in place of Galli
Curci, who was obliged to cancel her
engagement on account of illness.

Miss Gates has been a prominen
member'of the Royal Opera company
of Berlin for several years and has
only recently returned to this coun
try. On Wednesday evening of thi
week she substituted for Galli-Curci a
Newark, N. J., and singing before a
audience of 10,000 people created
a profound impression. At the con-
cert this evening Miss Gates will sine
the same numbers which Galli-Curc
was to have sung.
- Galli-Curci in Next Pre-Festival
It is announced that Galli-Curci wil
appear here at one of the pre-festiva
concerts next season.

rhons Initiate
Light Fresh Laws
Archons, junior law society, held its
spring elections yesterday afternoon.
The following eight fresh laws were
initiated: J. E. Chenot, W. O. R. John-
son, L. E. Joslyn, L. D. Larke, J. W.
Sargent, L. E. Waterbury, R. H. Wil-
son, and E. L. Zeigler.
After initiation at the Archons'
rooms, a steak dinner was given at
Bessimer's. President James H. Cart-
wright welcomed the new members1
and called upon Professor Evans Hol-
brook of the law department, andI
James Chenot for short talks.
/ants Wilson to
Control Food
Bill Introduced Would Permit Wilson
to Fix Prices, and Direct
Use of Edibles
Washington, May 3.-A new food bill
which makes the president virtually
food dictator, was introduced in the
house today by Chairman Lever ®f
the agricultural committee. The bill
gives the president absolute control
over shipments of, speculation in, and
even use of, food. The president is
authorized to fix minimum and maxi-
mum food prices, to seize food ship-
ments, to limit or stop the use of grain
in the production of alcohol, or
alcoholic or non-alcoholic beverages.
SENIOR SWING-OUT
COMES ON MAY 16
Block "1" to Be F(;rmed in March'
After Address by President
Hutchins
Senior Swing-out day will take place
this year on Wednesday, May 16.
All seniors will assemble in their
caps and gowns on the campus walks
at 4:05 o'clock. The senior lits wP
meet on the walk between the Mu-
seum and University hall; the en-
gineers and architects on the digonal
walk between Uniyersity hall and the
flag pole; the laws between the flag
pole and the Chemistry building; the
pharmics on the walk in front of the
cannon memorial; the homoeops at
the north entrance of the Economics
building, and the dents at the south
entrance of the Economics building.
Announce Line of March
The march into the Hill auditorium
will begin at 4:15 o'clock, the classes
falling in line in the following order:
Lits, engineers and architects, medic
laws, pharmics homoeops, and dents.
All will remain standing until the en-
tire senior body has entered. The
exercises will begin at 4:30 o'clock.
The Rev. Leonard A. Barrett will give
the invocation and the benediction.
A solo by Chase B. Cikes will pre-
cede the address to be given by Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins. The serv-
ices will close at 5 o'clock, the seniors
leaving Hill auditorium in the forma-
tion in which the entrance was made.
The seniors will then complete ac-
tivities by marching down State street
to South University avenue, east on
South University avenue to the en-
gineering'arch, passing up the diag-
onal walk to the flag pole, turning to
\the right and marching toward Water-
man gymnasium, and ending by a
- march west on North University av-
e enue, thus completing a block "M".
Seniors to Wear Caps and Gowns
r Members of the senior classes are
especially urged to wear their caps
t and gowns on every Wednesday and

Y Friday after Swing-out day until Com-
s inencement. Those seniors who have
- not ordered their caps and gowns
s should do so immediately in order to
t avoid the rush later that might lead
n to delay in the fulfillment of orders.
d

SCIENCE E X HIBSI TIO0N
DISPLAY OF 'ARIEN, IERIR-
lITHE, AND FOREST PRODUCTS
CONTINUE TODAY
Attendance at the Natural Science
exhibit is up to expectations and con-
siderable interest is manifested by the
visitors in the various displays. The
building will be open from 8 to 1':
o'clock, from 2 to 5 o'clock, and from
6:45 to 7:45 o'clock today.
:especial interest is shown in the
botanical garden display, the herbar-
ium room, the forestry display, the
wall cases in the corridors and the
psychology experiments.
Lectures and Pictures Today
Following is the list of lectures and
moving pictures for today: Lectures:
11 o'clock, room M-224, "Gems and
Gem Minerals, (illustrated), by Prof.
E. =1. Craus; 3 to 5 o'clock, room B-
207, "Plants that Feed on Animals and
Methods of Taking Their Prey" (illus-
trated), by Prof. S. B. Pollock; 3
o'clock, room F-213, "A Ranger in the
National Forest" (illustrated), by Prof.
P. S. Lovejoy; 4 o'clock, room B-421,
"Mushrooms and Destruction of Trees
by Fungi," by Prof. C. H. Kauffman.
Moving pictures: 10 to 11 o'clock,
"Work in the National Forest"; 11 to
l2 o'clock, "Relation of Animals to Ag-
riculture"; 2 to 3 o'clock, "The Min-
ing of Minerals"; 3 to 4 o'clock, "The
Growth of Plants." All moving pic-
tures will be shown in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.
Camp equipment for the forester,
the heliograph at work, the effect of
erosion on barren ground, methods of
cerosoting, and a large exhibit of
weoJ products used in the present
war, are some of the many things of
popular interet in the iorestrj c-
hibit.,
Tree is 1,460 Years Old
In the siviculture department is al
section of a large Oregon red-woodI
tree. It is ten feet in diameter and 1,-
460 years old. Fire regulation and the
prevention of forest fires are explain-
ed in detail. Photographs show fire
warmnius in the western part of the
1cuntry.
That the present war is very de-
pendent upon the wood supply is illus-
trated by a chart in the wood products
exhibit. Several tables are filled with
the manufactured wood products.
R. M. CARSON SPEAKS
AT U. OF MINNESOTA
Michigan Orator Competes in North-
ern Orati al League To-
night

MIJNIIIUb HLAE
MAY BE APPOINTED

Wilson Likely to Choose Minister
Control Affairs in
United States

to

Campus £dln
Day Is May 1i
Officers for Union aid University
Councils and Boards to Be
Chosen
Michigan's third annual all-campus
election day is scheduled for May 11.
At this time officers will be elected
for the Michigan Union, the Athletic
association, the Student council, the
board in control of student publicati-
women's judiciary council. Balloting
cations, and, in all probability, for the
will take place in the center of the
campus instead of in University hall,
as formerly. Nominations are to be
announced in the near future.

CONFERENCE OF GOVERNORS
DISCUSSES ORGANIZAT1ON PLAIN

Coffman D escribes America's
Problem as One of "Big
Business"

War

Washington, May 3.-Intimation that
President Wilson may appoint a
"minister of munitions" or at least one
in embryo was made today before the

defense conference of governors here A loree!

vys tic

by Walter F. Gifford, director of coun-
cil of national defense.
Sitting with the defense council,
representatives of 48 sovereign states
heard the announcement, and were
told that success of the country's arms
depended upon their aid.
Plans Urged for Co-operation 1
Each state was urged to organize as
follows: A state council of defense
for direct co-operation with the na-
tional council, and for interstate co-
operation, state committees of finance,'
publicity, medicine, and sanitation,
food supply and conservation, indus-
trial survey to sound out industrial
capacity and resources, survey to find
men for army, labor and military af-
fairs, and to co-operate with the war'
department in raising the great draft
army, and local councils of defense
in municipalties to co-operate with
the state councils.
Problem One of "Big Business"
America's war as a gigantic problem
of "big business" was discussed by
Hloward E. Coffman, chairman of the
munitions board of the national coun-
cil. "We are undertaking the biggest
business and industrial organization
job ever attempted in the history of
the world," said Coffman.
"We have before us three great trade
problems to facilitate the flow of raw
material and manufactured products
to our allies, the needs of our own
great building program, and to supply
these needs with the least possible
disturbance of the industrial and com-
inercial activities of our country. In
regard to this last, it is of the very
first importance that the country con-
tinue its ordinary business undis-
turbed. Practically evey concern
could turn over to the government'
from 25 to 50 per cent of its output
and still run its independent business
successfully. Moreover the need of
war must be met from profits and not
from diminishment of capital."

Carav-Appears
Ann Arbor's calm and placid thor-
oughfares will be desecrated by some-
thing other than weary and brain-
fagged students this afternoon.
For be it known that nine meek and
faltering sophomores will defile the
trails among the burning sands un-
der the careful guidance of those who
dwell along the banks of the far-dis-
tant Nile, and who have tortuously
counted every single solitary stone in
the mighty pyramids.
Sphinx initiates today and the bat-
tle cry of the Egyptians will be the only
classical music that the day shall
promise for these nine members of
the sophomore class.
The mystic caravan is gathering.
Aloree!
ORLAND A. MILLER
DIES -JROM POISON

IVNE VUBGE ULD
STORAGE CONCERNS
BE ClODMNED
SENATE IN MOOD TO LEGISLATE
AND CURB SUPPLY
SPECULATION
PLANTS DESTROY FOOD
TO KEEP PRICES UP
Senator Reed Opposes Drastic Plans
Proposed by Stone and
Borth
By Robert J. Bender .
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 3.-Charging that
cold storage concerns in the United
States are actually destroying food
in their plants, and on farms in order
to keep up prices, Senator Stone of
\issouri today suggested that the gov-
ernment commandeer these plants
during the war on place them under
supervision. Stone's revelation came
during a wide ranged discussion of
the embargo provision of the adminis-
tration's espionage bill.
Destroy Food in Storage and Fields
"I am reliably informed, so reliab-
ly that I believe it is actually true,"
Stone said, that cold storage managers
not only take food out of their own
plants and destroy it in order to keep
up prices, but go out into the coun-
try and buy food in fields and gardens,
and then allow it to rot on the ground.
Should it not be a crime for these and
other buyers to destroy healthful foods
of any kind before they had been prop-
erly inspected and condemned?"
Seiate in Mood to Legislate
Taken with Senator Borah's strong
denunciation of the packing interests
it is now obvious that the senate is in
the snood to take the most drastic ac-
tion in the history of the country to
curb speculation in food stuffs. That
bills will be introduced empowering
the government to commandeer pack-
ing and cold ztorage plants during the
7ar appeared certain today.
, Reed Opposes Drastic Plan
The food situation is paramount in
the minds of the senate now. It ran
intermittently through the entire de-
bate today. Reed of Missouri took ex-
ception to the drastic plans proposed
by Stone and Borah. "The question
to solve is not higprices or low
prices or losses," he said, "but the
question of production and how to de-
liver the products."
WILL STOP STRIKES
Government to Intervene in All Food
Riots .

l'oroner Says Student Committed
cide, But No Cause Is
Known

Suil-

Orland A. Miller, dent special, was
'ound dead, fully clothed, lying on
the bed in his room at 506 East Ann
street by his landlord, Mr. C. C.
Hadley, at 8 o'clock yesterday morn-
ing. Death resulted from poison taken
with suicidal intent, Coroner Burch-
field said after an autopsy had been
held by Dr. A. S. Warthin at 1 o'clock
yesterday afternoon. An inquest will
not be held.
Mr. Hadley's suspicion was aroused
by the fact that Miller drove his car
into the back yard Wednesday after-
noon and asked to leave it there for a
few minutes, but left it there througn-
out the night. Mr. Hadley was on his
way to the attic when he noticed Mil-
ler lying clothed on the bed, and he
immediately entered the room and
tried to arouse Miller but found him

Ralph M. Carson, '17, will delivgr
his oration, "The Scholar and the So-I
cialist," in Minneapolis tonight in the
annual contest held in the North-
ern Oratorical league. He will compete
with orators from Minnesota, North-
western, Oberlin, Wisconsin, Illinois,
and Iowa.
The Northern Oratorical league was
founded in 1890 and competitions have
been held annually. *Since the firstj
year, Michigan has won nine firsts.
Last year Nathan E. Pinney, '16, rep-
resented the University and was given
third place. Prizes of $100 and $50
are awarded to the winners of first
and second places, the money being
donated by the Hon. Frank O. Bowden
of Chicago, now governor of Illinois.

551 DEAD IN BLASTS
German Powder Factory Explosions in
Two Towns Reported

Enforce Sunday "Blue Laws" In Iowa
Des Moines, Ia., May 3.-Enforce-
ment of the Sunday "blue laws"
throughout Iowa will commence with-
in the next ten days and all Sunday
amusements will be closed, according
to an announcement made today by At-
torney General Havner.

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TAKE DRILLEI2,T £1CUJEE
ON FERRY ILl) TtDAY
Dne to the inclement weather
last Tuesday, the picture of
laci vs companies on the cam-
pus which are drilling was not
tfken. If the weather this aft-
ernoon is fovorable this picture
will be taken at 4:10 o'clock on
Ferry field.. Commanders are
asked to aid in getting their
units on the field in time.
* * * * * * * * * * *

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Committee toSelect Opera Scenario
A committee to review and select
material for the scenario of the 1918
Michigan Union opera was appointed
yesterday, the members of which are
Prof. Morris P. Tilley, chairman; Ly-
man Bryson, '10, and Francis M. Ba-
con, '02.
KISSES FALL RIGHT AND LEFT
IN hOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Washington, May 3.-ft was the
osculaters day in the house of repre-
sentatives today. It all started when
former Premier Viviani of the French
mission gallantly bent over to giss the
hand of Miss Rankin, congresswoman
from Montana. So did Admiral
Chocheprat, immediately following
Viviani. Marshal Joffre did not, but
a moment later succumbed and im-
planted a moustached kiss on the brow
of the daughter of Representative
Campbell of Kansas. Viviani at his
side then showered kisses on the chil-
dren of members presented to him.

Basle, Switzerland, May 3.-The
powder factory at Furth, Germany, ex-
ploded, killing 521 persons, and a
similar explosion at Proisdorrs killed
30, according to reports received byt
wireless today. .
SUPPLIES FOR FRENCH ARE
SENT BY LOCAL RED CROSS
Owing to the generous response of
the Ann Arbor people, the Red Cross
society recently has been able to send
to France six large boxes of new and
second hand clothing and hospital sup-
plies. Several thousand surgical
dressings are ready for use when ask-
ed for use when asked for by the Red
Cross.
All contributions of old clothing and
shoes may be be sent to the local Red
Cross rooms on Huron street.
Few Tickets Remain for Union Dance
A few tickets still may be obtained
for the Michigan Union dance tomor-
row night. Mr. and Mrs. George
Lewis, and Mr. and Mrs. Howard K.
Holland will chaperon the dance this
week. Those serving on the commit-
tee are: William K. Niemann, '17,
chairman; G. W. Holcomb, '18E, F. B.
Smith, '19, and D. M. Springer, '19E..
Ohio Plants Vegetables to Cut Prices
Columbus, O., May. 3.-In order to
prevent board fr m soaring to pro-
hibitive prices next winter, the Ohio
Union has arranged for tracts of
ground upon' which will be grown all
vegetaoles for use in the Uaon kitchen
next winter.

dead.
Officers Armbruster and Walker,
who responded to Mr. Hadley's callj
to the Ann Arbor police station, were
unable to find any trace of an exterior
cause of death, and summoned Cor-
oner Burchfield.
Extensive search of the room and
belongings of Miller failed to reveal
any cause for suicide. The body was
removed to a local uneertaking estab-
lishment and the parents, who reside
at Detroit, were notified. They ar-
rived yesterday afternoon.
WOMEN ENTER PROMISING
FIELD AS FARM WORKERS
New York City, May 3.-Columbia
women are volunteering for agricul-
tual service. The first call for agri-
cultural recruits was answered by 40
women yesterday afternoon.
Prof. 0. S. Morgan, under whose di-
rection the enrollment is being con-
ducted, stated that woman has a fu-
ture as a farm operator, a farm man
ager, and a co-worker with farm men.
Home economics . can be applied to'
gardening, canning, and practical farm
problems.
There are at present places for
trained women to earn salaries of from
$1,500 to $3,000 working with depart-
ment of agriculture.

jfexico Will Not Embarras U. S. in War
Washington, May 3.-Luis Cabera,
Gen. Carranza's minister of finance,
in a letter to Secretary Lane, pledges,
not only Mexico's neutrality but its in-
tention to do nothing to embarrass the
United States in the war with Ger-
many.

Sub Chasers Built at Milwaukee
Milwaukee, Wis., May 3.-A number
of submarine chasers are to be ,built
at Milwaukee and other lake ports
where are located plants of the Great
Lakes Boat Building corporation, it
was made known today following a
conference of government officials
with officers of the boat building con-
cern.

Chicago, May 3.-The government
will intervene in all food strikes af-
fecting the public, it was officially an-
nounced today by Charles Clyne,
United States district attorney. As in
the bakers' strike, pressure will be
brought to bear, and if necessary
plants or factories will b* taken over
and operated by the government rather
than allow shut downs because of la-
bor disputes.
Conforming to the new policy Hin-
ton Clabaugh, special investigator, to-
day summoned labor representatives
and officials of the Albaugh-Dover
company, manufacturers of tractor
gears, to his office to bring about an
adjustment of differences between
striking employees and employers.
SUFFRAGE AMENDMENT URGED
THROUGH WAR ARGUMENT
Washington, May 3.-Arrangements
l ave been made for a committee of suf-
frage and political leaders to see Pres-
ident Wilson May 14, to urge immedi-
ate submission of a suffrage amend-
ment to the states. They will argue
that the war for liberty and democracy
cannot be carried on wholeheartedly
until women have been given equal
political rights with men.

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