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October 15, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
ANN .ARBOR--
GE',NERALLY FAIR
WAR31EIZ

y2
7GN

UNITED PRE;S WIRE
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER IN
ANN ARBOR

VOL. XXVII. No. 12. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1916. PRICE FIVE CEI

STUDENTS SHOVEL
DIRT TO DEDICATE
UNION TO ANGELL

Dormitory Pictures
in Woman 's Paper
Two views of MartLa Cook dormi-
tory, one exterior and one interior,
are shown in the picture section of
the ,"Woman's Home Companion" for

I

Maulie 's

Eyes

Are on the Goall

TAKE PART IN EXCAVATING
BASEMENT OF BUILD-
. TNG.

FOR

FRESHMEN JURGED TO WORKI

Movies are Taken of Work
Starts Ieal Construction
of Union

That

Forty long handled shovels and
eighty strong arms kept three carts
busily moving yesterday morning when
the student dedication of the Michigan
Union in honor of Dr. James B. Ang-
ell was observed.
As soon as every student had thrown
a few shovelfulls of dirt he passed
the spade to the student behind him
and the driver of each cart had to
drive only once through the space be-
tween the students to fill the cart,
Before the dedication took place the
crowd had time to watch the actual
work on the building excavations. A
gasoline tractor, a big excavating
plough that carried the dirt up to a
wagon by means of a moving belt and
three black mules were the appar-
atus used in this work. E. H. Speare,
the photographer, appeared on the
scene' early and took some movie
films of the work.
Before the dedication was over the
marshals in charge of the event be-
came impatient at the small size of the
crowd and scoured the campus and
State street in search of freshmen who
were urged to come over and help ded-
icate the Union.
The dedication starts the work on
the excavations which will probably
continue for about 40 working days.
After the excavations are finished
work will start on the big basements
of the building.
WOMEN TO CAMPAIGN
lY FOR DAILYSUBSCRIBERS
Committee of 10 to Carry Successful
House-to-House Canvass
Into New Fields.
Continuing The Daily's sweeping
campaign for subscriptions, which has
resulted this year in the largest cir-
culation in the history of the paper,
the women of the University will be
given an opportunity to demonstrate
their interest in campus activities,
when a committee composed of 10
women carry on a canvass of sorority
houses, league houses and dormitories
during the coming week.
The committee, which has been de-
cided upon by means of an elimination
process, is to be announced early this
week in The Daily. The campaign
will be under the direct charge of a
university woman.
Circulation continues to increase
owing to the energetic house-to-house
canvass being carried on, and it is
predicted that the final count will be
far in advance of the present total,
which is 1867 for local subscriptions,
and 276 for foreign. At least 2,200 pa-
pers are run off the press each morn-
ing, in comparison to 1,650 last year,
and 1,750 In 1914.
HINDU POET WILL LECTURE
Speaks November 15 Under Auspices
of Oratorical Association
Rabindranath Tagore, the Hindu
poet and philosopher, will give a lec-
ture here on November 15. This is
the first time that Tagore has been
heard in this country, and the lecture
to, be given here is one of a series of
about ten which he will deliver this
year.
Tagore comes here under the
auspices of the Oratorical association
and some of the other speakers an-
nounced for this year are Suemus Mc-
Manus, the Irish poet, who comes next

month; Clum's travelogue and moving
pictures, October 24; Richard LeGal-
liene and the Hon. Francis Nielsen,
M Af whne ann c of~*n n n ~nO a wll

November. The photographs show
education de-luxe, for there seems to
be very little studying being done in
either view. No book, magazine or
single vestige of paper is visible. In-
stead, the interior view shows four
girls around one of the round-topped
gate-leg tables, seated in Windsor
chairs, and very sedately drinking tea.
The corner of one the fire-places juts
into the picture, the curtained windows
are in the background and as the
writer in the magazine said "well-
chosen lighting fixtures delight the
girl student's' esthetic senses." Al-
together, it is going to be hard to
make father believe that daughter is
telling the truth when she tells him
how hard university life is, and how
strict they are at the dormitory.
The exterior photograph shows the
front entrance to the dormitory. Three
girls are standing just outside the
door, engaged in earnest conversation.
A short paragraph under the view
reads. "No, this isn't the entrance to
a palace-ust one of the doors of the
Martha Cook Dormitory at the Uni-
versity of Michigan."
Late News Briefs
Newport, Oct. 14.-The German sub-
marine U-53 is rapidly drifting into the
"phantom" class so far as her pres-
ence off the New England coast as a
menace to allied shipping is concerned.
Not a word regarding the whereabouts
of the Teutonic raider was received at
any of the government radio stations
today.
Columbus, Ohio, Oct. 14.-Two per-
sons were killed and oe -probably
fatally injured when the New York
Central flyer from Cincinnati crashed
into an automobile at a grade cross-
ing here tonight. The dead are Miss'
Clara Edwards, 18 years old, high
school girl of Summerford, Ohio, and'
Robert Steel, 18 years old, of Lafayette,'
Ohio.'
Portland, Ore., Oct. 14.-Dr. Marie
Equi, local suffrage leader and Wilson
partisan, was thrown into jail here
this afternoon for hackling the mem-
bers of the Hughes Women's special'
train.
Mock Reception Is
Staged f or lovies
"I say, old man, where are you go-
ing in evening dress in broad day-
light?" "Are you getting your fresh-
man Initation all over again?" "Did
you have to walk home from Ypsi or
did you take a milk wagon?" These
were some of the questions hurled at
the heads of twenty campus celebri-
ties as they wended their several
ways in the direction of South Uni-
versity avenue at 9 o'clock yesterday
morning. Lest their reputations be
injured, let us say they were the lucky
youths invited to the mock reception
held on the promenade of Martha Cook
residence for the sole benefit of the
movie camera-man who was energet-
ically turning the little, crank to run
off one of the most decorative scenes4
of the municipal film. A lunch was
served during the course of the "party"
and much of the morning was spent
in dancing, after the movie man had
departed to snap some surveying part-
ies and the boulevard.
Miss Miriam E. Hubbard, '16, and J.
Rex St. Clair, '18E, are the principal
characters in the plot and the "recep-
tion" was held for their especial ben-
efit. These will be the last exposures
taken of the plot but today the church-
es and residences of the city will be
filmed. On Monday the manufacturing
plants will be the subjects and then
the entire photographic work will have

been completed. Yesterday afternoon
the game and crowds at Ferry field
played an important part and the Golf9
club, observatory, and University hos-
pital were also visited.

-Photo by Lyndon

NAME WORKERS
FR HBIGSMOKER,
Wider and, Smokes to be at Waterman
Gym When "M's" are
Awarded

FRESHMAN WOMEN
BANQUET AT GYM
Women's League and Y. W. C. A. Lead
Gathering of New
Women.

SMOKER TO BE ON NOVEMBER 241 CRUISE ON 'GOOD SHIP MICHIGAN'

Slides of the "M" men to be thrown
on the screen when they appear on
the platform, 600 gallons of cider, 60,-
000 cigarets, are the innovations an-
nounced by the committees in charge
of the Michigan Union football smok-
er to be held in Waterman gymnasium,
November 24.

"The Voyage of the Good Ship Michi-
gan" started last evening with the
opening banquet of the Y. W. C. A.
on Barbour deck. Dean Jordan acted
as pilot, Miss Eva Lenert as captain,
while the crew was represented by
Josephine Randall, '17, first mate; Mrs.
T. E. Rankin, watchman, and Elsa

Harry Gault, '17L, will act as mast- Paul, '17, second mate. Approximately
er of ceremonies, and Staats Abrams, 400 girls were on board as passengers,

'17E, will be the student speaker. Two
faculty speakers and an alumnus
speaker whose names have not yet
been decided upon will complete the
list.
Eddie Palmer, '17, general chairman
of the smoker announced the commit-
tees yesterday as follows: tobacco
and pipes committee, R. W. Collins,
'17, chairman; Jack Hibbard, '18E,
Fitz Van Brunt, '18E.
Committee on "eats" - Stanley
Smith, '17, chairman; Robert Patter-
son, '18; R. Gault, '19.
Tables and bleachers committee--
T. F. McAllister, '18, chairman; R.
M. Langley, '18E; E. C. Schacht, '18E.
Stands, chairs, and hat rack com-
mittee-A. Sternberg, '17E, chairman;
Matt Tower, '19; and A. Livingston,
'183.
Gym decorations and picture com-
mittee-T. H. Cox, '17, chairman; Ruf-
us Knight, '19; H. B. Coulter, '18.
Finance committee-Charles Fisch-
er, '18, chairman; Cecil Andrews, '18.
Publicity committee-E. E. Pardee,
'17; S. G. Pratt, '18E.
TRYOUTS WILL BE HELD FOR
NOVEMBER BAND BOUNCE
To give the campus the best pos-
sible show, 'and the greatest variety
of acts, Manager Atlas of the Varsity
band announced a new scheme for se-
curing material for the annual band
bounce.
Tuesday afternoon from 3 to 5
o'clock competitive tryouts will be held
in room 328 natural science building.
All those who have any ability along
vaudeville lines are urged to appear
at this time.

and for them Miss Aimee Renkes, '20,
acted as spokesman.
In all the talks, emphasis was placed
upon the goal of ideal womanhood, to
which this "Good Ship Michigan" was
steering under the direction- of the
Women's League and the Y. W. C. A.
Following the launching of the
"ship," passengers and crew adjourned
to the ship's cabin for a series of
stunts. The girls of Newberry Resi-
dence gave a clever portrayal of the
opening days of college. Various types
of students were imitated and these
were later assembled in a class called
"Practical Philosophical Philanderings
of the Plenipotentiaries and the Popu-
lar Peoples," with Evelyn Moore, '1?,
in the capacity of Professor Flunker.
The Synphonic league presented as
their share of the entertainment a
series of "Red Letter Days in the
School of Music," including the faculty
reception, Paderewski concert, the
John MacCormack concert and the
May festival concert featuring "Samp-
son and Delilah."
Mortar board and Senior society
produced a sensational "Mock Movie"
entitled, "The Turquoise Turmoil."
WILSON WINS OVER HUGHES
ON STRAW VOTE IN ALPHA NU
At the first regular meeting of the
Alpha Nu Literary society held last
night, a straw vote was taken on the
presidential race. Thirty-six ballots
were cast and of the number 24 were
cast for Wilson and 12 for Hughes.
At the next meeting, a prohibition
program followed by open discussion
is to be held and a vote will be taken
on the question of state-wide prohibi-
tion in the state of Michigan.

Roosevelt Raps
Wilson Methods
(By J. P. Yoder, United Press Staff
Correspondent.)
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., Oct. 14.-Char-
acterizing the Adamson eight-hour law
as "subordination of duty to political
profits" and as "deeply prejudical to
the real and permanent interests of
the laboring men," Colonel Roosevelt
tonight made his third campaign
speech in the interests of the Republi-
can candidate, Hughes. Sixty thousand
persons turned out to greet the Colonel
here.
Excepting passing references to the
Mexican situation, and to the tariff
issue, Roosevelt confined himself to
attacking not only the eight-hour law
but President Wilson himself for the
way the latter handled the threatened
railroad tie-up. He impugned the
president's courage and questioned his
political honesty "in yielding to
threats."
JMass fleeting and
'Eats 'for Women
When 3 o'clocks ,are done, and
your're feeling full of fun, come on
over to the gym to a meeting full of
vim. Then across to Palmer field,
where your appetites .will yield, 'round
a rousing big' bonfire to the wienies
you'll acquire.
Tag day Friday went off with 9 rush.
All were eager to wear the little blue
tags and to pledge their loyalty to
the support of women's athletics. And
now comes th.e big mass meeting for
all members. Four o'clock is the time,
Barbour gymnasium the place, Monday
the day. Every Michigan woman in-
terested in athletics is invited to the
meeting and the wiente roast on Pal-
mer field which is to follow it. Butch-
ers and bakers are busy filling the big
orders for wienies and buns. A load
of wood awaits cremation In the in-
terest of the hungry crowd. All is in
readiness to give the athletic depart-
ment a good start for the year. Those
who have not already become ac-
quainted with this organization should
not fail to do so now. Monday is not
too late to sign up. Membership cards
may be had at the mass meeting, and
the department is anxious to secure
the membership of all who care for
athletics whether or not they may take
an active part in them.
MENORAH TO HEAR DR.WOLMAN
Speaker to Discuss "Economic Status
of the Jews" This Evening
"The Economic Status of the Jews"
is the subject of an address to be de-
livered before the Menorah society
when it meets for the first time this
year at 8 o'clock this evening in New-
berry hall, by Dr. Leo Wolman of the
faculty of the economics department
and formerly of Johns Hopkins uni-
versity, where he received his doctor's
degree.
Dr. Wolman was special agent for
the United States commission of in-
dustrial relations in 1914. He has
made a deep study of the subject he
is to talk on tonight.
Abraham J. Gornetzky, '17, of Michi-
gan Union opera fame, will perform
on the piano. Plans for the coming
semester also will be announced.
J. F. SCOTT, ,16L, AND MISS
EDNAH O'CONNOR, '16L, MARRY

Ceremony Takes Place in St. Cloud,
Minnesota.
It has been learned that J. F. Scott,
'16L, and Miss Ednah O'Connor, '16L,
were married at St. Cloud, Minnesota,
on October 3. Mr. Scott is a member
of Phi Alpha Delta fraternity and was
the editor of the "Crease" last year.
He was a prominent player on his class
baseball and football teams and chair-
man of the senior social committee.
Junior Dents Nominate Class Officers
The following nominations have been
made by the junior dental class for
the coming elections to be held Mon-
day at 10 o'clock: President, F. J.
Bauman, D. W. Bach; vice president,
L. M. James, Jr., K. J. lifarcinklewicz;
secretary, Miss H. M. Smith, F. H.
Kelly; treasurer, H. C. Cramer, W. J.
Mason; athletic manager, J. O. Good-

SMT UNION WITH
FOUR ~TOUCHDOS
VISITORS PUT UP STRONG GAME
AND FIGHT ALL
WAY
NIEMANN GETS FIRST COUNTER
Forward Passes Play Considerable
Part in Wolverine Offense; Duel
Between Punters
Michigan encountered considerably
more resistance yesterday afternoon
than was experienced when the Wol-
verines entertained Carroll, and Mount
Union held the Varsity to a 26 to 0
store.
Mount Union's line was infinitely
stronger than that which essayed to
check the rush of the Wolverines
earlier in the week, and Yost's men
did not parade about the field in quite
the same care-free and unhindered
fashion. O'Connor at tackle headed
the defensive movements of the vis-
itors and his supporting cast was with
him every minute.
The Wolverines braced considerably
after a ragged introduction and with
Sparks and Maulbetsch carrying the
ball effectually, the Maize and Blue
scored four touchdowns. Brazell con-
tributed the most spectacular play of
the afternoon when he intercepted a
forward pass and raced 65 yards for
a touchdown. The Michigan back
nabbed the ball near the side of the
field and his flight was straight over
the line.
The game resolved into a punting
and fumbling duel at the outset.
Finally Sparks dropped the ball on
Michigan's 33-yard line and the Mount
Union team recovered. Peach stepped
to the fore at this juncture and inter-
cepted a pass. With the thoughts of
his atrocious fumble still rankling
fresh in his memory, Sparks ripped off
35 yards and placed the ball in mid-
field. Mount Union was penalized and
a moment later Sparks shot a pass to
Bulr Dunne who advanced to the 28-
yard line. On a kick formation Michi-
gan fumbled, but the Mount Union boys
considerately lost possession of the
ball in the same fashion. Bull Dunne
clutched another forward pass and
took the ball to the 5-yard line. Sparks
advanced four yards and on the fourth
down with a yard to make the ,ball
was entrusted to Maulie. The cap-
tain shot over but fumbled and Wal-
lie Niemann reclaimed it for a touch-
down.
The second touchdown was the re-
sult of a fumbled punt by Mount
Union. Weske fell on the ball on the
15-yard line and on the very first play,
Maulbetsch tore straight through the
line for a touchdown, bowling over sev-
eral tacklers and mussing up his op-
ponents in general. The half ended
with Michigan leading 12 to 0.
The Wolverines' third score of the
afternoon was the result of two ex-
cellent forward passes. With the ball
in the middle of the field, Sparks threw
to Peach who was downed on the 28-
yard line. A moment later the same
identical play carried the ball up to
within three yards of the line and Pat
Smith, who had been sent in, charged
over for six points more.
All three of the ends that worked
in yesterday's game gave a good ac-
count of themselves. Phil Raymond
worked nicely on defense, spilling the
Mount Union backs behind the line on

two or three occasions.
Moyer, the visitor's left half, gained
several times for Mount Union and
Cholly played an excellent game for
the defeated clan.
Coach Yost was satisfied with the
game as a whole, although the fre-
quent fumbles early in the contest
didn't please the head boss particu-
larly. Michigan's forward passing was
worthy of note and it proved to be a
valuable asset.
Touchdowns-Maulbetsch, Niemann,
Smith, Brazell.
Goals following touchdiown-Maul-
betsch 1 out of 3, Willard 1 out of 1.
Referee-Snyder (Harvard). Um-
pire-Kennedy (Chicago). Head lines-
man-Sampson (Iowa).

Presbyterian Church
HURON and DIVISION STS.

10:30 A. M. Mr Barrett

The Divine Fire

Noon

- Prof. W. D. Henderson speaks to students

7:30 p.m. Robert E. Speer

Cornell Enrollment Shows
Enrollment of Cornell univ

la

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