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May 03, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-03

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1THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
TODAY

I an

:4Iatii

UNITED PRESS
DAY AM) NIGHIT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 149. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT

iSE APTIVATED BY

J1'ighty Redmen
Pick 'Em Twelve

AMERICANS FACE
SUBMARINE DANGER

New York Promoters Get $1,900,000
by Operations of Dummy Directors

Iichiganiua Make Paleface
Gauntlet heap Fast,
Ugh!

Run

War Must Be Carried to Germany
It Is to Be Kept from This
Side of Atlantic

If

AP-

CNTIIAI() RESP~O.ND)STO
rIIAUSE W11,1,21.FIVEII
JEN CORE5

MME. GALLI-CURCI ILL;
SUBSTITUTE UNKNOWN
Chicago Symphony Orchestra and So-
loists Will Appear in Con-
cert Tonight
Mine. Louise Homer appeared as
contralto soloist with the Chicago
Symphony orchestra at the first fes-
tival concert in Hill auditorium last
evening and her charming personality
and artistic singidg completely cap-
tivated the audience. Mme. Homer
sang four arias which showed the
range and flexibility of her rich con-
tralto voice to advantage. In response
to the spontaneous demonstration of
appreciation, Mine. Homer generously
responded to five encores which in-
DR. ALBERT A. STANLEY, WHO,
will conduct a t 'hcocert this eve-
ning in Hill auditorium.
eluded "Star Spangled Banner,"
"Calm as the Night," "My Heart at
Thy Dear Voice," and "Sing to Me,
Sing."
Opened with America
The program was opened by "Amer-
ica," sung by the Choral union and
audience combined. Then followed the
Overture "Othello" played by the
Chicago Symphony orchestra, conduct-
ed by Frederick Stock. This composi-
tion, which is filled with color and
movement, was well adapted for the
position of opening number.
The orchestra was heard to good
advantage in Brahm's Symphony No.
3, F major. The other orchestral
numbers on the program were: Delius'
"Dance Rhapsody," whose oriental
character and modern harmonization
made it a number of unusual interest,
and the Symphonic Poem "Finlandia"
of Sibelius.
Mine. Homer's encores were ably;
accompanied by Mrs. George B.
Rhead.
Concert from Wagner
The concert this evening will con-
sist of Wagne's prelude, "Parsifal,"
and "The Dream of Gerontius," by
Elgar, sung by the Choral union with
the following soloists: Morgan Kings-
ton, tenor; Christine Miller, contralto,
and Gustaf Holmquist, bass. The
choral. work will be accompanied by
the Chicago Symphony orchestra, con-
ducted by Albert A. Stanley, and Earl
V. Moore, organist.
Owing to illness, Galli-Curci, the fa-
mous coloratura soprano, who was to
have appeared at the concert tomor-
row evening, will be unable to be pres-
ent. The name of the artist who will
appear in her place has not been an-
nounced.
LECTURE ON RUSSIA
Prof. C. L. Meader to Speak Before
Cosmopolitan Club
Prof. C.. L. Meader, of the latin de-
partment, will lecture on "Democracy

in Russia" at 4 o'clock this afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Meader will describe the
various forms of democracy which
have existed among the Russian peo-
ple for the last two centuries, and will,
give special reference to the recent
revolution and its results. The speak-
er spent several months in Russia,
and is well-informed on his subject.

While the lazy Shawandasee,
Lazy south wind, Shawandasee,
Whispered softly Indian legends,
Forth there sprang from lodge and
wigwam,
Warriors of the Michigamua;
Donned their war paint and their
feathers,
Echoed loud blood curdling war-cries
Swiftly darting toward the oak tree,
Swift as arrow seeks the red deer
So they sought their hapless victims.
Went they first to ancient wigwam,
Where had dwelt the Great Chief
Angell,
Whom they loved and whom they hon-
ored,
In their songs they sung his glory.
While the palface, weak as 'women,
Waited there to run the gauntlet, x
Fearful, made to bear the torture,
Soon were carried to the campfire
Taken to the tribal wigwam,
There to smoke the pipe of friendship.
Hailed as brothers by the nation,
Thus came into Michigamua:
S. S. Atwood, '18E, Alan W. Boyd,
'18, Elbridge G. Dudley, '18, C. W.
Fischer, '18, H. C. L. Jackson, '18, A.
L. Kirkpatrick, '18, A. V. Livingston,
'18, F. K. Miller, '18, W. L. Peach, '18,
P. T. Raymond, '18E, Guy A. Reem,
'18, E. C. Schacht, '18E.
OPEN NATURAL SCIENCE
EXHIBIT THIS MORNING
MOVING PICTURES, AN!) ILLUS-
TRATED LECTURES ON
PROGRAM
Moving pictures showing mother na-
ture at work, popular lectures on nat-
ural science, museums filled with
specimens in the various departments,
growing plant displays, psychological
experiments and numerous insects
displays, are among the many inter-
esting things in the spring exhibit ar-
ranged by the departments in the
Natural Science building which opens
at 9 o'clock this morning and extends
till 7:45 o'clock tomorrow night.
The zoology has prepared some
unique displays in the class cases sta-
tioned in the corridor of the second
floor. The hours during which the ex-
hibit is open are from 9 to 12 o'clock
in the morning, and from 2 to 5 o'clock
in thze afternoon, and from 6:45 to 7:45
o'clock in the evening.
Following is the program of lec-
tures and moving pictures: Today--
"Geysers of Yellowstone National
Park" (illustrated), by Prof. William
H. Hobbs, 10 o'clock, room G-217; 3
o'clock, "Plants That Feed on Animals
and Methods of Taking Their Prey"
(illustrated), by Prof. J. B. Pollock;.
3 o'clock, room F-213, "The Forester
on His Job," by Prof. P. S. Lovejoy;
4 o'clock, room B-421, "Mushrooms
and the Destruction of Trees by
Fungi," by Prof. C. H. Kauffmann.
(Motion pictures in Natural Science
auditorium) 10 to 11 o'clock, "The
Growth of Plants"; 11 to 12 o'clock,
"Fish Culture"; 2 to 3 o'clock, "Forest
Fire Fighting with the Aeroplane"; 3
to 4 o'clock, "The Mining of Minerals."
a
GERMANY APPEASES
ARGENTINE SINKING
Will Indemnify Country and Salute
Flag at Earliest Oppor-
tunity
Buenos Aires, May 2.-Germany has
given full satisfaction to Argentina for
the torpedoing and sinking of the Arg-
entine ship Monte Protegido, it was
announced this afternoon.

Germany has advised the Argentine
government that full details of the'
sinking have not yet been received,
but that the Berlin government in-
tends to indemnify Argentina and sal-
ute the Argentine flag at the earliest
opportunity.
Wheat Jumps with Futile Peace Talk,

Pittsburg, May 2.-One of the great-
est clean-ups in the history of wild
finance was disclosed here today as
the investigators under State Insur-
ance Commissioner O'Neil delved into
the books of the Pittsburg Life and
Trust company.
Within two days, he said, a group
of New York promoters, headed by

GOVERNMENT TO CORRECT
SITUATION IN SOME WAY

All

.+E j

Attorney Clarence Birdseye, got con-
trol of the big concern and milked it
for $1,900,000, through the operations
of a set of dummy directors. Warrants
have been issued for Birdseye and five
associates. In its April statement the
company claimed assets of $24,000,000
with insurance in force aggregating
$118,000,000.

Nation's Task Is to Co-ordinate
of Country's ActIvities to Vin-
dicate Demoeracy

Washington, May 2.-Secretary of
State Lansing this afternoon voiced
an official warning to the country on
the submarine menace. "We might as
well wake up to the fact that the situa-
tion is serious," he declared.
Following the statement of Secre-
tary of the Interior Lane earlier in
the afternoon that the Germans were
estimated to have sunk 400,000 tons of
shipping in one week, and that the
war would have to be carried to Ger-
many if it was to be kept from this
side of the Atlantic, Lansing's warn-
ing created the deepest impression in
Washington.
It was recalled that at the outset of
Germany's submarine campaign the
Berlin admiralty declared it would re-
gard the warfare a success if 1,000,000
tons a month were destroyed. The
rate of destruction reported by Lane
would be 1,600,000 tons a month. The
secretary indicated that this govern-
ment intends to make every effort to
correct the situation, though he re-
fused to say in what manner.
Lansing's statement came in the
course of questions on possible Ger-
man proffer. He indicated the gov-
ernment has not changed its position
of turning a deaf ear to any proposals
other than strictly bona fide offers.
President Wilson, addressing members
of the state's defense council at the
White House this afternoon told them
that the main task now before the
nation was to co-ordinate all activities
of the country so that democracy
would be vindicated.
MICHIGAN OPPOSES
FIXED FOOD PRICES

Plan Base Hospital for
Guard at Gray-
ling

NationalI

Lansing, Mich., May 2.=Michigan's
food preparedness board in session at
the capital today announced its oppos-
ition to the proposal for establishment
of maximum and minimum prices for
food products.
Announcement was also made that
none of the state's $5,000,000 war fund
will be used for agricultural loans.
It will be retained for military purpos-
es only. The establishment of a base
hospital for the national guard at
Grayling was planned.
13 OF CREW MISSING
Patrol Vessel Brings in 33 Survivors
of Rockingham
London, May 2.- Thirteen men of
the crew of the American steamer
Rockingham; torpedoed and sunk by a
German submarine, were missing to-
day. A patrol vessel brought in word
of the tragedy and 33 survivors
Those rescued were picked up yester-
day in two boatloads. One boat with
13 men is still missing. Shipping rec-
ords show the Rockingham;was a ves-
sel of 2,348 tons.
Successfully Raid German Trenches
Paris, May 2.-Intense artillery fire
in the Mont Haute and Mont Carnillet
regions and a successful French raid
on German trenches around Etarges
were among the incidents of last
night's fighting on the French front,
today's official report said. Repulse
of German attacks between Cerny
Murtebise and Craonne was also re-
ported. In the region of the Ladies'
Highway artillery firing increased.
Illini Farmers Reach Regina, Can.
Champaign, Ill., May 2.-The Illinois
university farm corps assigned to Sas-
katchewan was given a royal recep-
tion upon its arrival in Regina. They
were welcomed in Winnepeg by gov-
ernment officials, and were entertain-
ed there by the University of Manito-
ba. A dance and banquet were given
to the students in- the evening.

ARTILLERY DUEL LATS
GERMNSROM HILLTOP
FRENCH EVERYWHERE VICTOR-
IOUS IN ONWARD RUSH
FROM TRENCHES
By Henry Wood
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
With the French Armies in the
Champagne, May 2.-France is wag-
ing her greatest artillery battle of the
war to blast out the German hold on
the crest of Moronvillers, the Gibraltar
of the Champagne plains.
Within hearing of the continuous
thunder of her cannon, almost within
sight of them, French soldiers are
working along side of peasant women,
girls, and little children in plowing,
sowing, and harrowing the ground,
fighting France's economic battles as
their brothers in the trenches just
ahead fight the military campaign.
The battle line extended over more
than eight miles. All through the
night the isolated Germans sent up
multi-colored distress signals, seeking
assistance from the rear, while in
front of their trenches, over no man's
land, their illuminating shells mo-
mentarily turned night into day.
Simultanecisy with this all-night
combat on the face of the earth an
equally fierce aerial battle raged in
the star lighted heavens. Both French
and German army commanders sent
behind the other's line big bombard-
ing squadrons of aeroplanes. At 12:40
o'clock in the afternoon the French
infantry leaped from their trenches
and rushed up the slopes of Mont Haut
and Cornillet. In the first onward rush
the French were victorious every-
where.
MERLE DOTY CHOSEN
Y. M. C. A. PRESIDENT
E. K. Cunliffe, '19, Chosen Vice-presi-
dent; J. E. Robinson, '19,
Secretary
Merle B. Doty, '18E, was yesterday
elected president of the Students' Y.
M. C. A. for the year of 1917-18. He
was chosen by a small majority over
his opponents. Edwin K. Cunliffe, '19,
was chosen vice-president, receiving
nearly all of the votes cast for that
office. J. Ellsworth Robinson, '19, was
elected secretary-treasurer.
UNION COMMITTEE PICKS CHAIR-
MEN TO HEAD OPERA FOR 191S
Alan V. Livingston, 'SE, was elect-
ed general chairman of the 1918 Mich-
igan Union opera at the meeting of
the committee of committees of the
Union held yesterday afternoon.
Frederick J. Thieme, '18E, was
chosen master of costumes and Wil-
liam S. Dinwiddie, 118E, master of
properties. The position of stage man-
ager was awarded to Arthur G. Ga-
briel, '1, and Harold W. Collins, '18E,
was made stage electrician. Sherwald
W. Sedgwick, '19, will be chairman of
the music committee.
Books Contain Stories by Students
"The Animal Kingdom," a set of
childrens' books recently published
by the Educator's association, contains
stories by Linton B. Dimond, '16, Har-
old L. Cook, '17, and Margaret Wenley.
This set of books will be placed on
sale during the coming summer by a
number of University girls, and two
per cent of the receipts will be devot-1
ed to the Belgium relief fund. 1

Flour Goes Down 10 Cents a Barrel
Minneapolis, May 2.-Flour dropped
40 cents a barrel to $14 in the Min-
neapolis market today, with practic-
ally no demand. Cash wheat was
stronger, due to the belief that peacel
rumors were erroneous and more fa-1
vorable northwestern crop news.

10ARE PRESENT AT FIRST
G&EN EURALALUMNI REUNION
VISITORS INSPECT CAMPUS AND
ATTEND BANQUET
YESTERDAY
Due to unsettled conditions in the
country, not as many alumni reported
on the first Alumni Reunion day yes-
terday that undoubtedly would have
under normal conditions. The attend-
ance exceeded the 150 mark and the
day was spent in visiting classes, lab-
oratories, and inspecting the buildings
about the campus.
The main feature of the day was the
banquet at noon in Barbour gymnas-
ium where President Harry B. Hutch-
ins presided. The following topics
were discussed: "Academic Freedom
vs. Academic Duty," by Mr. Stuart
Perry, '97L, of Adrian; "Alumni As-
sociations and Their Relation to the
University," by Mrs. C. W. Hills, '96-
'97L; "Some Problems of University
Administration," by Regent Walter H.
Sawyer, '84M.
Chicago and Buffalo were especial-
ly well represented at the reunion.
That the success of the initial effort
to institute an Alumni Reunion day
at Michigan makes svchan institution
practically a certainty, was the opin-
ion of promoters of the movement.
PRESENT PLAY IN
COSTUME ON MAY 18
"The Merry Wives of Windsor" to Be
Given by Oratorical
Association
For the second time in its history
the Oratorical association will present
a Shakespearian play in costume;
when the comedy "The Merry Wives
of Windsor" will be given on May 18
i University Hall. The only other at-
tempt was in 1896, when the play
"Julius Caesar" was presented.
Experienced actors will appear in
the cast. Mark Bailey, grad., will
take the part of Falstaff, Clifford
Gracey, '17, takes the role of Mine
Host of the Garter, while C. R. Say-
ton, grad., plays the part of Justice
Shallow. Mistress Page and Mistress
Ford are represented by Minan Toles,
'17, and Effie Van Scoten, '17. Claude
Swift, '18, and Howard Haag, grad.,
act the parts of Page and Ford, re-
spectively.
Helen Davis, '17, has the role of
Ann Page, while Clarence Hunter, '17,
George D. Wildner, grad., and Paul
Womeldorf, '18, act as her three suit-
ors, Fenton, Slender, and Simple. The
remaining major parts, Sir Hugh Rok-
in, Doctor Caius, and Nym Pre played
by George Hulbert, '17, Lena Sackett,
'18, Moses Peters, '17, and J. C.
Sterns, '17.
GERMAN SAYS LOSS OF LIFE
AMOUNTS TO 1,300,000 MEN
Amsterdam, via London, May 2.-
One million, three hundred thousand
Germans liave perished in the war, ac-
cording to a statement made by Jos-
eph Friedrich Naunann, formerly a
conservative member of the reichstag.
Herr Naunann, lecturing on the "In-
fluence of the War on Population,"
said in part:
"Until now the war has caused a
loss of 1,300,000 dead. This, together
with the decrease in birth, gives a re-
duction of 3,800,000. The surplus of
females has increased from 800,000 to
far more than 2,000,000. The nation

has bled as never since ,the Thirty
Years war."
No Ally Advance Around Lens, Berlin
Berlin, via London, May 2.-Failure
of British and French advances around
Lens on the north and along the Aisne
to the south was reported in today's
official statement.

ALLIES TDODEMAND,
LAND CN SSINS
FROM BOTH FRONTS
PEACE BASED ON EVACUATION
IN WEST ALONE WOULD
BE BRIEF
HOPE ONLY FOR SIX-
GENERATION RESPITE
Commissioners Study Problem of
Building American
Army
By George Martin
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, May 2.-If Germany's
peace proposal, reported scheduled for
tomorrow, includes giving up her
strongholds in Bulgaria, Serbia, and
Turkey, the allies may. look twice at
the proposition, it was stated on high
authority here today.
But if Germany offers no conces-
sions in the eastern theater the al-
lies will brand the peace move as a
fake, because Germany's eastern con-
trol would give her a death grip on
a vital nerve center of the world.
No Permanent Peace
It also became known today that a
majority of the allies do not expect a
permanent peace in the sense of the
word that there will never again be a
war. They will be satisfied with a
peace assured for five or six genera-
tions. A peace based on concessions
on the western front alone, the evacu-
ation of Belgium, giving up Alsace-
Lorraine, and other similar conces-
sions, the allies say would mean only
an exceedingly brief pace, a mere
breathing spell for the Teutons.
Finish War Parley Soon
A high British commissioner here
expects that six days more will find
the world war parleys finished in its
broadest foundations. Secretary Bal-
four met Secretary McAdoo for a con-
ference today to review the shipping
an:.md financial problems confronting the
nations. The work of co-ordinating
and developing the resources of Amer-
ica continued among the other war
commissioners, but extreme curiosity
as to the nature of Germany's peace
move permeated all the negotiations.
if Germany's offer deals with con-
cessions on the western front the al-
lies will brand the German move as
propaganda to calm the mind of the
American and Russian people toward
Germany, and they will endeavor to
put the situation before the American
people as a move for a temporary
peace. Members of the committee ad-
mitted today that in such an event
they would use the German move to
turn the Teutonic propaganda against
its perpetuators and intensify the
American determination against aep-
arate peace, or against any peace
that is not binding for several genera-
tions at least.
Plan American Arm
As for the detailed progress of the
war parleys, another member of the
British commission said the shipping
and financial problems had been prac-
tically settled in detail, and that the
commissioners today had concentrated
on questions of how to build anAmeri-
can army. So searching has been the
American investigation of the. allies'
army system that the foreign commis-
sioners have had to cable their gov-
ernments for more information on a
dozen points.

IS SHELL STRIKE ON?
Indications Pohit to Impending Mun-
ition Trouble
Bulletin, by Arthur E. Mann
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Copenhagen, May 2.-The city of
Spandau, one of the biggest munition
centers of Germany, is under martial
law according to reports received here
this afternoon. Indications are that
a munition strike of big proportions
is impending.
Engineers Prepare for Spring Party
Second year engineers are busily
decorating the big Union dance hall
in maize and blue, for their spring
party to be held there tomorrow night.
Mr. and Mrs. 0. W. Boston, and Mr.
and Mrs. T. H. Cissel will act as chap-
erons. Admission cards, costing $1.00,
may be had atthe Union.

Chicago, May 2.-May wheat jumped
14' cents to $2.69/ per bushel at ine
close of the market today. A buying,
wave started on the strength of an ad-
vance at Winnepeg, and a feeling that
peace talk was futile at present.

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