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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

J

SPORT COATS

SOCIETY BRAND

SUITS

and Top Coats for Spring

A LARGE VARIETY

Priced from $8.50 to $12.00

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats and
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16.50 up.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM
FOR ELECTRIC REPAIRS
OF ALL KINDS CALL
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
If its net Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.

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Wadhams & Co.

State Street

Main Street

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TRAIN SEA FIGHTERS
AT GRETLAESCAMP
3,000 Recruits Given Nav al Funda-
mentals in Training
Station

Your Floral Needs=-
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PIONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION
==COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Members of Florists' Telegraph Delivery Association

They Ought to Serve

CE C RE AM

At Your Favorite Fountain.

Ask for it.

NEW RECRUITS SWELL RANKS
OF LAW CO1PANIES TO 232
Fifty-four more men reported to
law companies for drill yesterday aft-
ernoon swelling the ranks to a total
of 232 men.
'he organization of the companies
will not be made permanent until after
the officers' examination Saturday. At
present T. F. McDonald, '17L, Frank
S. Kremer, '18L, and Ralph A. Mc-
Ginnis, '17, are acting as captains.
Other positions being filled by those
who have had drill work before.

The three companies will meet daily,
except Saturday and Sunday, for the
rest of the semester in the places an-
nounced yesterday and will march to
the drill grounds for their two hours
work. Prof. H. L. Wilgus, of the Law
school who has charge of the military
work in that department, expressed
himself as pleased with the manner
in which the law students have taken
up the work.
Shirts made to measure, G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. tf

Detroit, May 1.--Sea fighters are be-
ing made to order at the naval train-
ing station at Great Lakes, Ill., where
3,000 recruits are now in training, and
15,000 are expected within the near
future.
Although the camp is located on a
small inland lake that boasts only a
small shore line, the prospective sailor
is grounded as firmly in the funda-
mentals of seamanship and the duties
aboard one of the government's float-
ing fortresses as though lie had been
given his schooling on board a war-
ship.
The time for instruction has been
materially shortened because of the
great demand for men, but the quality
of those turned out at the station is as
high as ever, due to several causes.
The men taken in are only of the high-
est physiedl and moral standards,
while the equipment and facilities for
instruction at Great Lakes are of the
most modern types, down to the small-
est detail.
Land and Buildings Worth $3,500,000
Great Lakes is situated about 30
miles from Chicago, on Lake Michi-
gan. It embraces several hundred
acres of land, with a group of build-
ings designed especially for the pur-
pose for which they are used, and the
plant as it now stands cost the gov-
ernment approximately $3500,000.
Ever since its establishment it has
been the headquarters for a large
number of recruits, but, under stress
of war, activities have increased to
such an extent that about 3,000 men
are taking part in the studies and
drills that are to fit them to take
places in the navy.
Training of Recruits
T nder ordinary ccnditions a recruit
remains three weeks in the detention
barracks to acquaint himself with his
new surroundings and absorb the at-
mosphere before beginning his drills.
Now, however, his services are so bad
ly needed that his time is cut cdown to
a minimum, and if all things are fa-
vorable he may start his actual train-
ing almost at once.
Care of the clothing given him is
the first lesson instilled into the re-
cruit's mind. Neatness of the person
and saving of expense of clothing
maintenance make this the primary
matter that it is.
Rudimentary drills in squad and
company movements, and preliminary
training in seamanship, signalling,
ordnance, and physical exercise, in
eluding swimming, are then under-
taken. The details of practical sea-
manship are thoroughly entered upon.
once the preliminaries have been
mastered.
Academic courses are also main-
tained for the deficient along general
educational lines, and until a certain
standard is reached the courses are
compulsory.
Recreation is allowed the men in
many ways, that the continued train-
ing may not become irksome. Base-
ball, football, long hikes and camping
out, and cutter drills and competitive
contests are allowed during times of
leisure.
Pay While in Training
During his stay at the naval station,
and while under actual instruction,
the recruit is paid at the rate of $17.60
a month. This is practically clear

Iro'. expense, as he is given free
clothing, quarters, and subsistence,
while in the event of sickness he gets
free medical attendance, and his pay
continues uninterruptedly.
Upon leavina the station his pay
imedatlyadvances to $21 per
month, and he is given the rating of
second-class seaman. As an enlisted
man he may be able to work up to the
station of chief petty officer, with pay
from $55 to $100 per month, or even
rea th'e rank of warrant officer, with
allowvances as high as $2,800 a year
and retirement on three-fourths pay
when fie reaches the age of 62.
Warrant officers who can pass the
e>amirations required may be pro-
mnof d to the rank of commissioned of-
fiers, which opens up still further in-
ducements.
The Outit at reat Lakes
With the idea in mind of turning
out men from the Great Lakes sta-
tion, developed both mentally and
physically, it has been fitted out on
an elaborate and at the same time
practical scale. The training station
proper consists of a community group
of moder-,nlin' that include quar-
ters for ihemen, a great 500 foot
armory thif atca be used in inclement
weather as a drill hall and accommo-
dat: 250 men, a gymnasium, educa-
tionl and administration structures,
auditorlin, mess hall, with officers'
quarters in a row on the banks of
Lake Michigan.
In addition there are the "tented
cities" that will be utilized in shelter-
ing the hundreds of young men who
are pouring in from all points in the
midde t in response to the na-
tion's tail for volunteers. The total
of 1 ,00 en beg in training at one
time is soon expected, and plans are
being made with that in view.
DISUSS UNIICTIO
OF 4 RELIIOS OR

CULTIVATING THE CLOTHES SENSE-
No way to do it but to see as many clothes as pos-
sible that are excellently made-of well-combined
colors-and of graceful lines.
Coming to the Hutzel Shop often will show you
what to wear and how to wear it.
Huiel 's
MAIN AND LIBERTY
When You Break Your 'Glasses
Go to Haller & Fuller's
STATE STREET JEWELERS
WHYP
Because you get prompt service and Have Your
Lenses Accurately Ground.

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Leave Copy
at a
Quarry's and Students'
TheaSDV E RTI S IuNSt

CAMPAIGN

0 ' "i 'ITE) AMONG
SOON

A Typewriter Exceptional
For Collegians
Change your type in an instant from one
style to another-or any language.
THE
MULTIP LEX
HAM MOND
Two sets of type in each machine.
Just Turn the Knob" Presto one or the other
Simiple-Compact-Portable
Beautiful work-beyond compare.
If not inclined to a new machine,
inquire for our Factory Rebuilts.
We Rent Machines of high quality.
Patrons: President Woodrow Wilson
Cardinal Merry del Val
Dr. Alexander Graham Bell
Chancellor Rev. B. G. Trant
Bishop John G. Murray
William Dean Howells
also all Colleges and U.versities
Our special terms to collegians will
interest you. Catalog for the asking.
Hammond Typewriter co.,
545 E. 69th St., New York
88 Griswold St., Detroit

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Insurance and law busi-
ness. Located in city of 8,000 in-
habitants. Net income of insurance
business amounts to $1,000 a year.
B. F. Savery. Phone 692-J. 29-1-2
FOR SALE-One May Festival ticket
for Wednesday evening, one for
Thursday evening, Front balcony.
Call Stark, 1203-M. 2
FOR SALE-Two excellent May Festi-
val tickets on main floor for Wed-
nesday evening, Friday and Satur-
day afternoons. Phone 1521-J. 2
FOR SALE-Two May Festival tickets
main floor, center section. Choice
of concerts. Preble. Phone 1816.
526 Church St. 2-3-4
FOR SALE- Festival tickets. Full
course, first row, first balcony, cent-
er. Call 687 in afternoon, 2
FOR SALE - Two course or single
tickets for the May Festival, first
balcony, first row. Call 30-J. 2-3
FOR SALE--Two May Festival tickets
main floor, Friday and Saturday aft-
ernoons. Phone No. 7. 1-2
FOR SALE-May Festival course tick-
et, main floor and second balcony.
Phone 1873-J. tf
FOR SALE-A full course May Festi-F
val ticket at a reduction. Call
1910-M.
FOR SALE-May Festival ticket main
floor, center section. Will sell at'
cost. R. Heatley. Phone 1717. 2-3
FOR SALE-May Festival course tick-
et. First balcony. Enquire at Desk,
General Library. 2
FOR SALE-Guitar and case in Al
condition. Phone 1358-M. 1-2-3-4

LOST

LOST-A large size leather covered
note book, in State St. Lunch, before
Easter vacation. Reward. No ques-
tions asked. Phone 402-R. 1-2-3
LOST-A Conklin self-filling fountain
pen between Alumni Memorial Hall
and the Delta, Friday afternoon.
Finder call 2339. 2
LOST-Blue Chinchilla overcoat. Re-
ward if returned to 203 S. Thayer1
St., Ann Arbor. 2-3-4-5
LOST-A pair of glasses in case. Call
368. Reward. 1-2-3
WANTED
WANTED-To exchange, two second
balcony Festival tickets for two first
balcony or downstairs seats. Willi
pay premium. Call Lasher, 2189-WI
after noon. 21
WANTED - A lady for educational
work in Kalamazoo. $240 for sum-
mer. Phone 359-M. 1-2-3
WANTED-A white porter. Apply at
621 S. State St. Phone 1328. 2
MISCELLANEOUS
AN INTELLIGENT person may earn
$100 monthly corresponding for
newspapers; $40 to $50 monthly in
spare time; experience unnecessary;
no canvassing; subjects suggested.
Send for particulars. National Press
Bureau, Room 2558, Buffalo, N. Y.-
Adv. tf
FRATERNITY BOARD- The Merkle
House is prepared to serve good
board to any fraternity, closing its
dining room on account of absence
of some of its members. Call Merkle
House, 503 E. Jefferson. Phone
2466. 2-3

epeentati 'es from the Y. M. C.
A. and Y. l. C. A. cabinets, secre-
aiis o_ , educational boards of the
diiter'e t denominations, and pastors
of the varhous churches in the city
w onvene at 9:30 o'clock tomorrow
morni] i Lane hall for the purpose
of discussing the unification of re-
li--ous work among the students.
A plan will be submitted for a cam-
paign in this regard. Other phases of
religious work among students will
also be discussed. The conference
will continue Thursday.
NOTICE
At its May meeting, the Board in
Control of Student Publications will
choose a business manager and man-
aging editor for each of the following
publications: The Michigan Daily,
The Gargoyle, The Inlander, and The
M1ichiganensian. It is the policy of
the board in filling the positions on
the publications under its control, to
award them on the basis of merit to
those who have served in minor posi-
tions on the publications to which the
positions pertain.
It sometimes happens, however,
that no one who has served on the
publications during the year is elig-
ible or capable of filling one of the
leading positions for the ensuing year.
When such circumstances arise, the
board finds it necessary to consider
outside candidates. This notice should
not be considered as an intimation

1

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

SPRING

Hats & Caps

In new Shades and
Shapes

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.

THE

27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

Varsity Toggery

Zvw

Ii

-

-

-

LET US SE 1YOU

that these circumstances- will arise
this year.
All applications for these positions
should be in the hands of Professor
F. N. Scott, on or before May 7, in
order to be considered. Each appli-
cation should contain a statement of
the experience of the applicant and
should be accompanied by any letters
of recommendation which he may
have.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT
PUBLICATIONS. apr26-28may2-5
100 Yale Students Sign Applications
New Haven Conn., May 1.-Applica-

SHOP

AN ASSORT ENT OF VT OR RECORDS
on our twenty-four hour approval plan! Select a doren nm bers, you
would like to hear in your omn home. Phone us, 1707, and we will
send same.
VICTOR VICTROL A l FIOM U 0 jt : 300.00
CONVENINT PATMENTS!
GRINNELL BROTHERS
116 SOUTH M NISTRIET

1107 So. Univ. 1107 So. Univ
tion blanks for the Yale motor truck
reserve corps were signed by 100 stu-
dents yesterday. Enlistment is for a
term of four years.-
Junior Engineers pay class dues in
Engineering Society rooms today from
5 to 12.--Adv. 2
My diamonds are fine quality and
reasonably priced. J. L. Chapman,
Jeweler. .113 Main St.-Adv. wed-eod

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