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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

£ I MM LV1~11-MN LJ U I

.1.

DAY':

GAMESI

11LL rLRIIIIII1b
V TRACK EVENTS
le or Medley Relay Race to
lie ,Next Cinder Fea-
ture
GREATLY PLEASED WITH
K OF FRESH 440' RUNNERS

National League
Brooklyn vs. New York, rain.
Chicago vs. St. Louis, rain.
Cincinnati vs. Pittsburg, rain.

EASTERN CLASSIC CALLED LACK OF A BACKSTOP
off ON ACCOUNT OF WAR PREENTS BALL GAME
INTERCOLLEIATE TRACK MEET l.ESERVES MTAY JEET VARSITY
A BANDONED BY RESO- TOl)AY; ALL- FRESIL
LUTION TOMORROW

Boston ......1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0-2
Philadelphia 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0-3
American League
St. Louis ..0 1 0 0 1 2 9 0 0-4
Cleveland .0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0-2

7
6
9
7

1
2
1
2
3
0
2
0

Yearling Quartet Would
iterested Teams in Penn
Carnival

Have

Athletics ..1 0
Boston ....1 3
Wash. ...0 1 0
N. Y. 0 1 0

0 0 0 0
1 0 0 0

0 2 0-3 10
0 1 0-6 12

0 0 0 1 1 0 0-3
0 1 0 0 1 0 1-4

9
6

ach Farrell is planning more com-
ion for track men following the
essful day the freshmen had Sat-
hile the coach is not expecting to
on any numbers this Saturday, he
enough up each sleeve to give his
something to do nearly every
k during the remainder of the year.
rrell explained last night that the
osed two-mile relay would not be
this week owing to the cold
her of the past several days, and
consequent lack of practice that
tigans athletes have been able to
xt week either the two-mile relay
medley relay between classes will
eld. In the event of the medley,
ever material seems best will be
1 All four classes in the Uni-
ity will be given a chance to be
esented. Indications point toward
edley made up of a 220, 440, 880,
mile run. Steve will bend par-
ar energy this year toward mak-
th? Class meet the season's big-~
affair, now that athletics with
ide teams are b nned.
.rrell is decided yof the opinion
the freshmen could have also
shed the old yearling record for
Penn relays. The coach is not
mpression that his 1920 tracksters
I have breezed in ahead of the
a yearlings, but contends that the
g would have been hot all the
The Red and Blue runners ran
quarters in 3:22, an average of
2 seconds per individual. With
nued training from the start of
eason, the Wolverine track coach
y believes that the Penn young-
would have had no holiday with
hunch of freshmen.
rry Butler and Hunt showed Sat-
y that they are decidedly promis-
naterial. Bergazin stretched him-
over the course in exceptionally
style when one considers that he
't had much of a chance at this
on of thie game since entering
igan. Forbes would undoubtedly
shown up much better if he had
een running against a man who
hugging 50 seconds.
ntington showed the best in this
that has characterized his ath-
career. With Fontanna, Scofield,
Hardell putting up the improve-
that might be expected of them
e the end of the year, Michigan
i have had a fast running quar-
ks Draft Will Not Affect Players
w York, April 30.-President
son of the American league said
x that while he had no assurances
government officials, he has rea-
o believe that if the conscription
:ecomes operative it will not be
ed to the player on his circuit
the season ends in October, asi
are now being given military
ing under army sergeants. I
r Gets Hits and Steals Home
>rge Sisler had a bad day in
land Sunday.
George did was play errorless1
get three hits, score a run and
home. Outside of that you
dn't have known he was on the1

Detroit vs. Chicago, rain.
LEAGUE STANDINGS
American League
W. L

G.

Boston.............9
Chicago...........10
New York..........7
St. Louis.8
Cleveland.8
Athletics...........6
Detroit.............5
Washington4........4
National League
W.
New York..........8
St. Louis...........9
Chicago............9
Boston.............6
Cincinnati..........9
Philadelphia.........6
Pittsburg...........7
Brooklyn...........3

4
6
5
7
9
8
9
9
L.
4
6
7
5
10
7
11
7

Pet.
.692
.625
.583
.533
.470
.428
.357
.307
Pct.
.667
.600
.563
.545
.474
.461
.389
.300

Philadelphia, April 30.-The annual
championship meet of the Intercol-
legiate Association of Amateur Ath-
letes of America, which was scheduled
for Franklin field, Philadelphia, May
25 and 26, will not be held this year
because of the war.
The executive committee of the as-
sociation at a prolonged meeting here
today adopted the following resolu-
tion:
"That by reason of the state of war
now existing and the general partici-
pation on the part of the students of
the members of the I. C. A. A. A. A., in
military training or other intensive
activities, the members of the associa-
tion be, and by this resolution they
hereby are, requested to send no en-
tries to the annual track and field
championship meeting for 1917."
In place of the annual champion-
ship meet it was suggested that the
I. C. A. A. A. A. hold a patriotic and
athletic demonstration on Franklin
field on the day originally set for the
games, the proceeds to go to the Am-
erican Red Cross fund. A majority
of the athletes of the colleges and un-
iversities holding membership in the
association are expected to be under
the control of the governmuent by en-
listment or otherwise before May 26,
and it was decided to submit the pro-
position to Secretary of War Baker. If
the consent of the war department is
given the demonstration will be held.
PENN STATE TO CONTINUE ALL
SPORTS, ANNOUNCES MANAGER
Further Conflict with War Department
Plans Will Result in Can-
cellation

Fourth Round of
Tennis Tourney on
Westbrook and Kelsey Playing Good
Game; Name Contestants
in New Matches
Tennis enthusiasts are very much
pleased with the showing made in the
first tournament of the season, which'
is being held under the auspices of
the Tennis club. On account of the
efficient handling of the tournament,
and the willing and intelligent co-op-
eration of the entrants, play has al-
ready progressed to the fourth round,
and with favorable weather, the finals
should be reached by Thursday. Con-
sidering that this is the beginning of
the season, the brand of tennis shown
even this early in the tournament has
been astonishingly fast, and speaks
well for the quality of matches later
on.
Westbrook, the freshman star from
Detroit, put up some very fast matches.
Kelsey, another fresh racquet wielder
who proimses to make-things interest-
ing for his opponents this year, played
a high class brand of tennis in his
first matches, defeating Strouse and
Hulbert in hotly contested three-set
matches.
Following are seven of the contest-
ants who will enter the fourth round:
Westbrook, Shields, Bartz, Davidson,
Kelsey, Harrison, and Egbert.
ADVERTISING COMPETITION
MANUSCRIPTS DUE TODAY
Manuscripts in the University adver-
tising competition are to be handed
in today. Unusual interest has been
manifested this year, due to the as-
sistance the Tryads have given the
rhetoric department in arousing inter-
est. It is not known definitely how
many manuscripts will be entered, but
indications are the number will be
greater than in any previous competi-
tion.
America's finest watches are Hamil-
tons. J. L. Chapman, Jeweler, agent.
113 So. Main St.-Adv. tue-eod

Lack of a catcr for the All-fresh
prevented a game ifrom bein p layed
yesterday afternoon between the Var-
sity and Dal- Maltby's yearlings. Plans
that would permit the teams to clash
were sent out fro the Varty camp,
but were "reeked by the scarcity of
the verdnts, who had a whole team.
minus a pitcher and a catcher.
Lundgren offered to donate Parks,
Ohlnacher, or Gariepy to his pros-
pective toes, but could not part with
Mattson, the only catcher out for prac-
tice. Scouts were out all afternoon
to capture Haidler or Morrison to fur-
rish the necessary catching. Blue
Monday seemed to have gummed things
up generally, and no game was played.
Throughout the exchange of diplo-
matic notes between the two camps,
Varsity hostilities did not cease.
Coach Lundgren and Cush kept the
outfielders busy with long flies. Cush
took up his pastime after he had been
pitching for hits and bunts to a set
of batsmen. The boys went the
rounds, tapping a hit and then a bunt,
but play was spoiled by Cush, who
insisted on being umps as well, as
pitcher, and called everything a foul.
The coach wound up the day's work
with nearly an hour of snappy infield
practice for Mattson, Newell, White,
Brandell, and Horwitz. Captain Bran-
dell speared everything that came his
way, and the other boys came across
with long streaks of air-tight work.'
Birmingham was absent, having
gone home to confer with his father
about military work. He will be back
in a few days, but expects to leave
again, permanently, in about three
weeks.
Guy Reem still is out of the game
with a sprained ankle, suffered lasta
week.
Varsity and Reserves probably will
clash this afternoon on the diamond.
Tomorrow meat for the regulars will
be furnished by Dale Maltby's All-
fresh. No game for Saturday has been
arranged yet.
ONE-LE4GGED MAN STARS AS
WESTERN COLLEGE ATHLETE
Robert Carver, a 20-year-old student
at the Washington State Normal
school, refused to be relegated to the
athletic discard when fate robbed him
several years ago of his left leg. Grit
today has made this one-legged young
man a wonder of athletics in the
Northwest. He is the star center on
the basketball five, performs brilliant-
ly at the tennis net, and has a posi-
tion on both of the football and base-
ball teams. Last season he and his
brother won the doubles tennis cham-
pionship of Spokane county.]
In the gridiron sport Carver plays
at a tackle position and opponents
have found his place in the line an
almost impenetrable spot. In base-
ball he plays first base and actuallyI
hops the bases and slides for home
plate. Carver is studying law.
Andoxer Coah Joins Ambulance Corps
Andover, Mass., April 30.-Frederick
J. Daly, a football coach, and 20 stu-
dents of Phillips-Andover academy,
will leave here May 1 for France, to
join the American ambulance field
service.
All interscholastic sports have been
suspended at the acdemy. Military
training is held five days a week.

Delayed-JMarble
for Library Here
sutr ural Seel Also Bein= Brought;
'1enmporary Shelves to Be
Constructed
Material for the new Library build-
ing is arriving daily. The marble for
the stacks, delayed because of the na-
tion-wide freight congestion, has been
receive(, and will be put in place as
soon as the plastering is finished. This
will probably be in about a week.
Structural steel is being received in
large quantities, and left outside the
old building. This will be used in the
front part of the new building, where
the old reading room is at present.
The hoisting and concrete towers,
used in the construction work, have
been removed, and the work on the
roof is finished. New shelves will be
put on the fourth and fifth floors to
hold the books in the upper reading
room until the permanent building is
completed. It is not known at pres-
ent when the new reading rooms will
be ready.
KANSAS PROFESSOR PROPOSES
"ALFALFA MISCUITS" IN WAR
Lawrence, Kans., April 30.-"Alfal-
fa biscuits" are a war possibility, ac-
cording to Prof. Elizabeth Sprague,
head of the economics department of
the University of Kansas, who has
been conducting a series of experi-
ments with alfalfa flour.
Professor Sprague has found that
the weedy taste and green color of the
alfalfa bread can be eliminated if pro-
perly handled. The biscuits have, a
line flavor, and possess certain miner-
al properties which are lacking in the
wheat biscuits. Not to exceed 10 per
cent of alfalfa is mixed with wheat in
making the biscuits.
Reserve Officers Train at Presidio
Seattle, Wash., April 28.-Students
ht the University of Washington who
are enrolled in the reserve officers'

training corps must attend a three
months' camp at Presidio, Cal., bsegin-
ning May 8, or resume their regular
university work. Such were the in-
structions received from the western
army headquarters yesterday.
WAR TAXATION PLANS TO BE
ARGUED AT ADELPHI MEETING
Ways and means by which the gov-
ernment may best raise funds for the
demands of the war will be discussed
at tonight's meeting of the Adelphi
house of representatives.
A resolution conferring authority on
the president to seize all in excess of
$100,000 of any one person's yearly in-
come has been introduced by the Dem-
ocratic members of the society, and
will be debated at the meeting.
t
}A
ICopYright LartiuYI . .... .ir.aniar
Style for Summer
The correct thing will be a
coat with some style of belt-
with white flannel trousers
for semi-dress, and trousers
to match the coat for busi-
ness. A
Hart, Schaffner
& Marx
suit best fulfills demands.
'They have breezy, careful,
comfortable style, and are
right for work or play; all
wool, well tailored, and they
fit. Let us show you a few
of them. Also
MANHATTAN SHIRTS
KNOX HATS
LATEST NECKWEAR
Roule-Conln-Fiegel Co.
Southwest corner
Washington and Main Sts.

State College, Penn., April 30.-Penn
State has decided to continue all.
sports unless they conflict with fur-
ther plans of the war department. R.
H. Smith, graduate manager, has an-
nounced thit no schedules would be
abandoned at present. ,
With all students drilling six hours
a week under regular army officers,
the State college athletic authorities
see no reason for immediate cancella-:
tion of outdoor activities. Schedules
will be abandoned, however. If the
students are called upon to devote ad-
ditional hours to the study of military
tactics. Penn State's position is similar
to that of West Point and the land-
grant colleges in regard to athletics.
The college schedule provides for drill
hours in addition to the time given to
athletics and studies.
A separate ha ttalion has been organ-
ized for the athletes, who were form-
erly excused from obligatory drill
which is imposed op the other stu-
dents. Since the college was founded,
more than 50 years ago, all State col-
lege students have been under arms.
The college athletes are now learning
the fundamentals in an hour's drill
every evening. Already intense en-
thusiasm has been aroused by attempt-
ing to surpass the performances of the
12 other companies of the college regi-
ment, some of which have been active
for two years.
Have your shoes full-soled in leath-
er or Neolin. We specialize in thin
work. O. G. Andres. 220 So. State. 13-6
Use the advertising columns of The
Michigan Daily in order to reach the
best of AnnArbor's buyers.

r01CIce nt
ai's
EARL Sr W t 45O N
The Sales Division of the METRO-
POLITAN Magazine (Theodore Roose-
velt exclusive contributor) offers live
out-door employment to college men
and women. Many students will earn
a large part of next year's tuition by
this summer's work. Ten subscrip-
tions every working day for a month
will earn $365.00.
METROPOLITAN
"The Livest Magazine in America"
432 Fourth Ave. New York

.s y
_
:

4

t
r
40

a eW .:3'.ra':as¢v .R rMI:: '='AYr attR0.19m : q- reawarrav: ...

When You See
the Word

.Y ? ~y
"4' x

MARK

TRADE

v

A Real Pipe
for
College Men
These are two of the
24 popular shapes in
which you can get the
Stratford'
$1.00 AND UP
W D C Hand Made
$1.50 AND UP
Each a fine pipe,
with sterling silver ring
and vulcanite bit.
Leading dealers in
town carry a full as-
sortment. Select your
favorite style.
WM. DEMUTH & CO.
New York

Think of Curtains, made to measure,
best materials used, and satisfaction
guaranteed.

{ANGKIT

Protect Your Telephone
T HE desk telephone, consisting of more
than one hundred parts, is a mechanism
as delicate and intricate as a watch.
Since the original Bell Telephone was constructed,
there have been seventy-four different Bell models
designed for the purpose of obtaining improved com-
binations of strength, simplicity and utility.
The Telephone Company is constantly on the alert
to keep its equipment ready for tastant use.
Subscribers can co-operate with the Telephone
Company in preserving the delicate apparatus, and so
insuring good service, by never leaving the telephone
where it can be knocked to the floor and jarred or
damaged.
Michigan State Telephone Company
J. J.Kelly, Manager
Telephone 500

PILBEAM & MARZ CO.

Genuine
French
Br iar

720 Peter Smith
Bldg.
Detroit, Mich.

301 No. Main Street
Ann Arbor, Mich.
Phone 2380

6404 Utica Ave.
Cleveland, Ohio

V _ 1 4

r'v

121 East Washington Street

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