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May 01, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-01

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED-PROB-
ABLY SHOWERS

PA

4:a It

UNITED

C'

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

,_
..r., .

VOL. XXVII. No. 147. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 1, 1917. PRICE FIVE C

MEN WITH ORDEIRS
TO REPORT SOON
Others Will Present Themselves from
May S to 14 Upon Com-
mander's Orders
r
CANDIDATES WILL BE CALLED
WHEN ACCEPTED FOR CAIPS

1,ooo Surgeons Will Be First
U. S. Force Sent to Europe

NIV Y GIVES
MAgNY TO COUNTRY

Washington, April 34.-One thou-
sand surgeons wearing the American
uniform and dispatched as a military
unit will be the first United States
expeditionary force to be sent to the
European battlefields,'the war depart-
ment announced this afternoon. The
plan was proposed to the national de-
fense council by its general medical

board, and was immediately adopted.
The proposal was the outcome of
conferences between United States,
French, and British medical repre-
sentatives here. P. H. Goodwin, rank-
ing member of the British medical
forces in France, who is now here,
will act in an advisory capacity in or-
ganizing the force.

Fraternities and house Clubs
Have 435 Enlisted
This Week

Will

Thirty-five More Recommended
Five Camps Yesterday; To-
tal Now 94

for

A picture will be taken of all
men taking military training at
4:10 o'clock today on Ferry field.
Company commanders must get
their men to Ferry field by that
time. An attempt will be made
to get the naval reserves in the
picture.

A[UMNI TURN OUT FOR
REUNION DAY TOMORROW.
MORE THAN 150 EXPECTED; REG-
ISTER IN ALUMNI BUILD-
ING
More than 150 Michigan alumni
from the state of Michigan and the

BIGGEST APPROPRIATION I
ESTIMATE__ SUBMITTED
BUDGETS FOR ARMY AND NAVY
EXTENSION LAID BEFORE
HOUSE
Washington, April 30.-The first
funds to finance the armies of the
republic were asked of congress to-
day. An appropriation of $2,699,485,-

A bulletin issued by the central de- cities of Chicago, Toledo, Cleveland,
partment of the military training and Buffalo, will be in Ann Arbor

camps association gives the following
directions for men applying for ad-
mission to the camps:
Men who have already received their
commissions for officers' reserve corps
will be ordered by department officers
to report at their designated camps
from May 1 to May 8; all others May
8 to May 14; but only upon orders
from the camp commander.
The title "Approval Card, Second
Tnd," on the application blank, taken
by itself, seems to indicate that every
candidate who receives this duplicate
card from the examining officer is en-
titled to attend the camp. Such is not
the case. This "Second Ind." signi-
fies that the candidate has been found
"eligible" for attendance at the camp
and has received a certificate to that
effect. As stated under "directions"
on the reverse side of the application
blank, "From these certificates the
camp commander will select and notify
2,500 men for each camp, if more than
that number are certified to him as
suitable."
All .candidates who have received
their certificates of suitability must
therefore remain at their home ad-
dress until they have received from
the camp commander a postcard noti-
fying them that they have been chosen
for attendance at camp and authoriz-
ing them to report at camp. A post-
card so received constitutes the an-
thority of each candidate, and will be
brought to camp by him and presented
to the camp adjutant upon arrival.
Men passing the examination given
by Major C. W. Castle for entrance
to training camps will not have to pass
further examinations. They will be
limited, as the bulletin states, only by,
the number of men applying for ad-
mission to the training camp and the
choice of the commanding officer. The
examinations for admission to the
camps were supposed to close y ester-
day but will be continued for a few
days.
As the result of examinations held
yesterday the following number of
men were recommended to the camps:
One to Leon Spring, Texas; two to
Fort Snelling, Minnesota; three to
Fort Benjamin Harrison; 25 to Fort
Sheridan; four to Fort Riley. This
makes a total number of 94 men rec-
ommended from Michigan.
UNION TO AID ALUMNI IN
SECURING ACCOMMODATIONS
With the prospect of more than 200.
Michigan alumni returning to Ann Ar-
bor tomorrow for Alumni day, the
Union has offered its services as a
clearing house for securing accom-
modations for the visitors.
Persons with vacant rooms or suites
to rent are asked to phone the Union,
leaving their address, telephone num-
ber, and a general description of the
rooms.

tomorrow to attend University Alumni 281, the biggest in the history of the
reunion day, according to the number nation for the army and navy, and

of letters received from alumni at the
office of the Alumni association.
Registration will be from 8 to 9
o'clock tomorrow morning in the
alumni room in Alumni Memorial hall,
where guides will be furnished and a
schedule of University work will be
handed out. Programs and tickets for
the Alumni luncheon also will be dis-
tributed.
Between 9 to 11 o'clock visitors will
attend classes and laboratories. The
formal program opens at 11 o'clock
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall were the
following topics will be discussed:
"University Growth and Develop-
ment," by Dean John R. Effinger;
"The Graduate School," by Dean Al-
fred H. Lloyd; "The dradluate Year of
Medicine in Detroit," by Dean Victor
C. Vaughan; "Student Health and
Housing," by Dr. H. H. Cummings;
"The Michigan Union," by Dean Henry
M. Bates; "The New Library and Its
Importance," by Librarian Dilliam W.
Bishop.
Luncheon will be from 12 to 2
o'clock in Barbour gymnasium, where
President Hary B. Hutchins will pre-
side and several ajumni will speak.
Between 2 and 3:45 o'clock an in-
spection of University buildings will
be made including the science exhibit
in the Natural Science building.
The last conference will be from
3:45 to 5 o'clock in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium where specific prob-
lems pertaining to the Universtiy will
be discussed.
The May Festival begins tomorrow
night and alumni may still obtain a
few tickets by addressing requests to
Charles A. Sink, secretary of the
School of Music.
Y.M.C.A . OFFICERS
CHOSEN TOMORROW

extra governmental needs was laid be-
fore the house by the appropriations
committee.
The military establishment is al-
lotted $2,192,423,535, and the naval es-
tablishment $503,399,673. The secre-
tary of war is authorized to expend
"not over $9,000,000" immediately for
permanent aviation schools and posts
at experimental stations and. proving
grounds. For the naval establishment
$11,000,000 is available for aviation.
Navy Budget Items
Other large items for the naval es-
tablishment are pay for the navy, $75,-
000,000; provisions, $31,740,000;
construction and repair, $54,000,000;
unirunition, $60,000,000; reserve or-
dnance supplies; ,$19,000,000; torpedo
appliances, $11,000,000; ammunition
and batteries for merchant auxiliaries,
$49,000,000; new batteries for ships,
$22,000,000; powder purchased and
manufactured, $20,000,000.
Approximately $500,000 is made
available for naval training stations
in California, Rhode Island, on the
Great Lakes, and at St. Helena. The
total estimate submitted by the war
and navy departments aggregated $3,-
460,000,000, but the appropriations
committee cut it down.
Army Appropriations
The big items in the military budget
are as follows: Pay for the army $219,-
000,000, clothing and camp equipment,
$231,000,000; ordnance supplies, stores,
and ammunition, $260,000,000; auto-
matic machine rifles, $39,000,000;
armored motor cars, $3,900;000; manu-
facture of arms, $53,000,000; trans-
portation of army and supplies, $160,-
000,000; mountain, field, and siege
cannon, under head of fortifications,
$120,000,000; ammunition for the same,
$367,000,000. The total under the head
of fortifications, exclusive of the Pana-
monl is U,04000)00 with $2-

FORT SHERIDAN AND NAVAL
MILITIA SECURE MAJORITY
Only Three Spring House Parties Now
Expected to Be
Given1
- t
Four hundred and thirty-five men1
from the fraternities and house clubst
of tlh University will leave school this(
week for service in the varioust
branches of the national service.,
The training camp at Fort Sheridan
is claiming the majority of those who
are planning on leaving, while many
of the men enrolled in the Michigan
companies of the naval reserve aret
members of the fraternities and house
clubs on the campus. The ambulance
corps is being recruited in great part
from fraternity members, while the
mosquito fleet and the aviation corps
have already taken many. A few are
now planning on leaving for farm+
work, and it is possible that the next
few weeks will see many who are too
young for draft aiding in the produc-
tion of crops.
War Changes Campus Interest
The interest of the campus has so
changed that little consideration is
being given to the parties and house
dances that are usually so frequent
at this time of the year. Only two
out of all the fraternities and one of
the house clubs are planning on hold-
ing their anual spring house parties,
while the preparations of the others
have been stopped and the contracts
cancelled.
AlphaDelta Phi with 18, Delta Kap-
pa Epsilon with 19, Beta Theta Pi with
20, Psi Upsilon with 15, Phi Alphu
Delta with 15, Sigma Chi with 17,
Zeta Psi with 20, and Monks with 16
men planning on leaving some time
within the week for service, head the
list. Hhe Hermitage club has the un-
usual record of nine men enlisted in
the naval reserve companies here,
while the Delta Kappa Epsilon fra-
ternity will have but six men left in
their chapter when the final man plan-,
ning on leaving departs.
These Are Going This Week
The list of fraternities and house
clubs with the number of men who ar
expecting to leave within the week
or who have already left, follows:
Acacia, 7; Phi Kappa Psi, 9; Alpha
Delta Phi, 18; Alpha Rho Chi, 5;
Alpha Sigma Phi, 8; Alpha Tau Omega,
8; Phi Kappa Sigma, 10; Beta Theta
Pi, 20; Chi Psi, 10; Sigma Nu, 12;
Delta Chi, 14; Delta Kappa Epsilon,
19; Delta Tau Delta, 12; Delta Theta
Phi, 7; Delta Upsilon, 12; Gamma Eta
Gamma, 10; Kappa Beta Psi, 8; Sigma
PMi, 14.
Kappa Sigma, 8; Lambda Chi Alpha,
1; Nu Sigma Nu, 3; Phi Alpha Delta,
15; Phi Chi, 1; Phi Delta Phi, 10; Phi
Delta Theta, 12; Phi Gamma Delta, 8;
Phi Sigma Kappa, 9; Pi Upsilon Rho,
6; Psi Upsilon, 15; Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon, 10; Zeta Psi, 20; Sigma Chi, 17;
Sigma Phi Epsilon, 6; Sinfonia, 7;
Theta Delta Chi, 13; Theta Xi, 3;
Akhenaton, 9; Eremites, 12; Hermit-
age, 12; Knickerbocker, 6; Monks, 16;
Phoenix, 8; Pylon, 6; Trigon, 8.
Rearch Council Taking Census
Ithaca, N. Y., April 30.-At the re-
quest of President Wilson, the national
research council has undertaken the
collection of information concerning
the research men and facilities avail-
able for the use of the government.
Yale Ambulance Goes to Front June 1
New Haven, Conn., April 30.-Yale's
first unit of the American ambulance
corps for service in France is being
organized. The unit will go to the
front the first of June.

All Lit Students
Pay Dues Today
Students Urged to Pay Due to Un.
certainty of Existing
Conditions
Collection of class dues for the en-
tire literary college will start this
morning at 11 o'clock at tables placed
in front of the Library. Hours of col-
lection will be from 11 to 12 o'clock
in the morning and from 1 to 3 o'clock
in the afternoon.
Due to existing conditions outside of
the University which make future
plans uncertain, it is especially urged
that members of all classes make an
extra effort to pay up their dues either
today or tomorrow in order that their
respective classes may settle with all
creditors before the end of the pres-
ent semester.
In case the present system of col-
loecting dues sloes not meet with the
success it deserves in the minds of
the executives of the classes, there is
a strong possibility that a house to
house canvass of the members of the.
department will 'be made soon. In
case of rain at the hours set for the
collection of dues, the collection ta-
bles will be set in the west corridor
of the Library.
SINGING OF A EICA
TO USHER IN FESTIVAL

NOTED LIST OF ARTISTS TO
PEAR IN ANNUAL
EVENT

AP.

The twenty-fourth annual May Fes-
tival will be ushered in with appro-
priate ceremonies tomorrow evening
in Hill auditorium when "America"
will be sung by members of the
Choral union and the audience as well.
it is highly probable that all of
the evening concerts this year will be
opened by a patriotic hymn. Oliver
Wendell Holnes' "Hymn of Consecra-
tion," which has been set to music by
IProf. Albert A. Stanley, and which was
originally.intended to be sung at the
celebration in honor of the naval re-
serves, has been arranged for chorus
and will be sung by the Choral union
at the opening of the Thursday even-
ing concert.
The annual May Festival brings to
a fitting close the musical activities
of the year in this city.
As usual, the Metropolitan Opera
company is well represented and this
year finds no less than six of their
members upon the list, DeLuca, Maude
Fay, Hinshaw, Louise Homer, Mar-
tinelli, and Matzenauer all having a
place on the festival program. Be-
sides these Galli-Curci, Holmquist,j
Kingston, Leginska, Christine Miller,
and Biggs, whose reputations as mu-
sicians and artists are no less firmly
established, will appear on the pro-
gram.
The Chicago Symphony orchestra ofj
70 men, conducted by Frederick Stock,
will contribute several orchestral'
numbers besides playing all of the
accompaniments.
The University Choral union and
the children's chorus, trained and con-
duced by Professor Stanley, will also
be heard at this festival
FRESH LITS DRILL; TO HOLD
SMOKER AND PLAN BATTALION
More than 75 fresh lits reported for
drill at Waterman gymnasium yester-
day afternoon. The freshmen drilled
in company formations supplemented
by work with the rifles.
A fresh lit military smoker will be
held at the Union tomorrow night, and
plans for forming a battalion will be
discussed. If such a battalion is
formed drill hours which are con-
venient will be arranged so that all
members of the class can participate
in the work.

LOR NORTH CL1FFE
ATTACKS BRITISH
HENVAL STRUCTURE
MOVEMENT ON FOOT FOR REOR-
GANIZATION OF ENTIRE
ADMIRALTY
SUBMARINE LOSSES
KEPT FROM PUBLIC
Poor Coast Protection and Failure to
Combat German Submarines
Emphasized
By Ed. L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent,)
London, April 30. - Close on the
heels of the news of the shakeup in
the French army and the appoint-
ment of General Petain in supreme
command of the forces on the western
front, comes the news of the crusade
led by Lord Northcliffe, for the re-or-
ganization of the British naval branch,
both shakeups denoting in all proba-
bility the preparation for an intensive
summer drive.
Demand Rehabilitation
The entire British admirality was
under a widespread public demand for
rehabilitation today. Lord Notlchffe,
the man who led the crusade of 191,
which resulted in the great shakeup
of the war office, and Lloyd George's
appointment as first minister of mun-
itions, was behind today's movement
for re-organization of the naval
branch. Press and public appeared to
agree with him in every particular.
Make Three Criticisms
The admiralty is under attack from
three directions; first, there is wide-
spread criticism of its failure to'com-
bat mbre successfully the German sub-
marine menace; second, the admiralty
is blamed for insufficient coast pro-
tection, permitting a number of Ger-
man destroyer raids on seacoast cit-
ies; third, and probably most import-
ant of all, the public is aroused over
supressiop of the full facts as to the
seriousness of the submarine cam-
paign and allied losses.
The opposition to. thg admiralty
reached the house of commons today
when questions were asked of the first
Lord of the Admiralty, Sir Edward
Carson. "As the number of German
submarines is increasing, we must ex-
pect a corresponding increase in the
danger to shipping," he replied, refer-
ring to the statistics of sinkings.
Fail to Give Public Facts
Lord Northcliffe is leading the way
in the criticism of the navy, directing
most his energy toward forcing the
admirty to give full facts on the sub-
marine operations. He advances the
theory in which he is supported by the
public that if England was aware o
exactly how great the inroads on her
food consumption has been due tc
submarines, the government would
have an easier time applying economy
The misleading statements of losses
issued weekly by the admiralty hav
given a false impression of England's
security, according to Northcliffe and
his fellow crusaders.
'PICKED FOR DEATH'
Note Reveals Assassination Ploti
Against Wilson and Others
Trenton, N. J., April 30.-Assassina-
tion plots againt President Wilson
Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard'

Taft, and Senator- Tom Taggart, are
believed to have been revealed today
through the death of Charles G
Mueller, Indianapolis architect, who
dropped dead of heart disease last
night in the hotel lobby here.
Coroner Bray and United States
Marshal Snowden found in Mueller's
pocket a note book in which was
memoranda stating that Wilson
Roosevelt, and the others were "picked
for death." A loaded revolver was dis-
covered in Mueller's hip pocket.

All Members of Organization Given maaais i JJv 'vvv vvL.%7v,
Vote; Many Ballots Now 000 additional for the protection of
the canal
Y. K. C. A. officers for the year 40 MORE MEN LEAVE
of 1917-18 will be chosen tomorrow.
Cards containing the names of the Applicants Permitted to Take Up
candidates have been sent out to all Farm Work; Receive Credit
members and a number of votes have
already been dropped in the box at Forty applicants received favorable
Lane hall. commendation by the literary commit-
Ballot boxes will be placed in the tee on military instruction and ser-
west corridor of the Library and in vice at its meeting last night in the
Lane hall from 8 o'clock in the morn- office of Dean John R. Effinger, and
ing to 7 o'clock in the evening. All with the 26 who were granted leave of
members of the organization are urged absence last Friday, will withdraw
to cast their votes. from the University within a few days
The following are the candidates for to take up farm work.
office: President, Merle B. Dotty, These students will get their credits
'18E; Neal D. Ireland, '18L, and Ed- for the incompleted work of this sem-
ward 0. Snethen, '18L; vice-president, ester and will be eligible to return in
Ernest R. Baxter, '18; Norman C. the fall without entrance examina-
Bender, '19M, and Edwin K. Cunliffe, tions.
'19; secretary-treasurer, J. Ellsworth The committee will receive applica-
Robinson, '19: William H. Dorrance, tions daily and pass upon them at
'19E, and Herman H. Chapman, '18. their meetings from time to time.

h

University Halll
8:00 P. M.

Christian Science Society of the University of Michigan Announces
a Free Lecture on

TODAY!
The Public is-
Cordially Invited

0rsi

Suilc.ncc

By
Jahn Randall Dunn, C.S.
of St. Louis, Mo.
Member of the Board of
Lectureship of The Mother
Church, The First Church
of ACh r i s t, Scientist in
Boston, Massachussets.

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