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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1917 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 1 1L..IA'.Zk'. 1llC t~ -.VL H '1L.i

I I

Store
of the
Hour

Y
/ r 's
,
s c ;>;
i t . }
c fO :. ,
" ' _
aR ^

The

Hit

'l'AI !"JYOUR~
matuer Finishing to a Reliable Photographer
who has an established reputation and you will be assured of
Results that will not be a disappointment.
L Y N719 N. University Ave

SPECIAL

1

SALE

of the
Season

ON

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stab ed 1905, and
Crow ug bigger and better every day.

THE CAVALIER
FOR WOME14
Description -Latest Shade--Cherry Tan imported Russia Calf
-high grade English last, one and one-half inch Walking Heel,
Oak Tanned, Welted Soles, exactly as pictured.
Our Price $7.00, Replacement Value $9.00

f!

S, Main St.

Hoffstetter's
WALK-OVER

115
Main St

S l

BOOT SHOP

m

w,.

FRATERNITIES
We havelunsurpassed accemodations for group photographs

MAIN STUDIOS
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Perfect Portraitures
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PH,,3N]C948-Wi

r,

AOYKSM MING---ELECTRIC REPAIRING
HIGHEST QUALITY
William W. Behringer
11 NICKELS ARCADE

11

students i E droled in A lmost very
Branchel of .ails ary anid
Naval 'service
R1 CJIENT WILL HOLD RIFLE
RILL (ON ()VERNMENT RANGE
, Co : ipe smpany
~Y jf in' P c~i t WIlson's
Call t! Arms
Philadelphia, April 27.--Possessing
a regiment 2,100 strong, a military
band, signal corps, aviaion corps,
with faculty men training, 150 stu-
Jents enlisted in the coast defense re-
ser%,e, with plans for a machine gun
corps for Oring, and agricultural and
industrial nrollment beginning, the
University of Penn aylvania is prepared
or any burden the nation may place
Under the direction of Major Wil-
li,1'f Kelley Jr., U. S. A., professor of
niilitar science and tactics, the 18
cornmpaies of the university regiment
take inteusive drill two consecutive
Ours every (lay in the week except
Saturday and Sunday. Four com-
panics have progressed to extended
ore and the other companies are
gradually working up that point.
1,00 l-t-ieRifles
One thousand of the men are
equipped with rifles, and 700 more will
be armed within 10 days. The war
(1eparttment has arranged to allow the
n to hold rifle practice at the
government range at Essington, below
Phiadlpha. The first regimental
parade was held on Franklin field
April 20 before Provost Smith and
Major Kelley.
Ar ateroon classes in the four
n::Q{ raduat departmentsthave been
sYortcnced fromn one hour to 45 min-
utes starting at 1:30 instead of 2
a'eek in order that a greater part
of the ateroon be left for drill. Ex-
aminations for men wishing to quali-
sy s cadet officers are held every Sat-
rrzde.

Thurs.-26--Joan Sawyer in "Love's
Law" ; and Christie Comedy.
Fri.-27-Lionel Barrymore in "His
Father's Son"; and Vigman Com-
edy. i'Sc.
Sat.-28-Lillian Walker in "Kittie
MacKay," and Mrs. Vernon Castle
in "Patria." inc.

Orpheum Theatre
Mtiznes, 2:00-3:30; Evengn, 64S,
8:15, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Sat .-28-WM. S. Hart in "The Gun
Fighter." Also Triangle Comedy,
"Ilis Deadly Undertaking." Even-
ing 15c.
Sun.-Mon.-22-3o-Marguerite Clark in
"The Fortunes of Fifi." Also Holmes
Travels. i5c.
______________________________________1

edw.r sw

Put your order in NOW for those-,--

Pop. Mat. Wed. W k.April 23
a GA RB CK 50 tO $2.00
est Seats $1.50G RR I Nights
DETROIT50t$20
BERNARD SHAW'S COMEDY
"GettingMarried"
A R C A D 8o E
Oherwi e r-iftl

SLIGHTLY
SOILED
ATHLETIC

DANCE PROGRAMS DE LUXE

SHEEHAN & CO.

I

GOODS

which you'll need for that

FORMAL SPRING PARTY

i

I

TAMMIMMOMON

..

YHONET I
PHONE 2255

* $$
.ae Theatre
= TODAY =
W..OX cOMEDY presents the
Funniest of all Comedies,
"earts and Saddles"
Also NANCE O'NIEL
In
cc Souls in Bondage "

The Mayer-Schairer Company

Statioiiers-Printers-Biders- ngrei-s

VA ALOW STUDENTS
TO FARMCITY TRACTS
tJ)V IS ,BILI T OILSUJCIIACTION
TO BE l)ISCUSSEI) IN
I EETING
At a meeting of the literary stu-
ents who have had farm experience
nd wish to return to the farm, at 3
'clock this afternoon in the Natural
cience auditorium, the advisability
f ging students, whose homes are
.ot on farms, small tracts of land
round Ann Arbor and allowing them
o raise beans, will be discussed.
Dean John R. Effinger and W. E.
inderdown will be the principal
peakers. Dean Effinger will explain
Lie question of granting credits to stu-
ents who are given a leave of ab-
encel

Choral Union ushers hand In cards
today as list of substitutes must be
made uip at once.

_112 S. Main Street

.__ _.

$17 and More

CIS,
$17 and More

I

lIt~COlLcfatc

Purdue: Eightiy-seven freshmen of
the university have not learned to
swim yet. The athletic department
has announced that no one who is
unable to swim will be allowed to
graduate.
lowa: A large number of students
of the University of Iowa have applied
for admittance to the reserve officers'
training camps. The cavalry is the
favored branch of service.
Oberlin: The faculty has decided
not to close the university a month
early this year, but credit will be
given to those who enter government
or farm service. Ten students have
left to take agricultural positions.

Spring Hats
Ready
FOR YOUR
INSPECTION
The ONLY place in ALn Arbor
to get REAL Hat Service.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Next to the Delta
Gor. Packard and State

CLOT ES T AT FIT!
We make such clothes. Not only do they fit, but they are also
of the'latest spring styles. Trhe.1, too, every student wants

quality. You will get it at
Ward's Kassy Kut Klothes
F. W. ALLEN, Manager 118 E. huron Street

I

DANCE

SUCCESSFULI

Pod i(A S 1 ' A ttended; Special
iFezai res Giveii
White uni'orms, a liberal scattering
ot fiag, gooK music, and more than
7;; (oupies combined to make the Red
Crs ball held last night in Water-

WHAT'S GOING ON

I

Today
3 o'clock-Dean J. R. Effinger ad-
dresses all students interested in farm
work in Natural Science auditorium.
3:45 o'clock - Cosmopolitan club
members meet in corridor of Univer-
sity hall for their excursion.
6 o'clock-Craftsmen club banquet
in Masonic temple.
6 o'clock-Christian Endeavor ban"-
laet in Presbyterian church.
7 o'clock-Meeting of Upper Room
Bible class at 444 South State street.
7:30 o'clock-Upper Peninsula club
meets in basement of Lane hall.
8 o'clock-Dr. R. F. De Bois speaks
o Women's Research club in Natural
Science auditorium.
Tomorrow
10:45 o'clock-Dr. Scott Nearing
peaks at Baptist church.
11:55 o'clock-City planning class
neets in auditorium of Congrega-
ional church.
6:30 o'clock - Unitarian society
neets at Unitarian church.
7:30 o'clock--Rev. E. F. Tittle
peaks at Methodist Episcopal church.
U-Notices
The Choral union will rehearse at
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in Hill
uditorium;
All members of the soph lit base-
all beam will report at 1:30 o'clock
his afternoon on south Ferry field for
}le game with the fresh lits.
The entire cast of "The Merry Wives
f Windsor" will meet at 9 o'clock to-
ay in University hall.
Freshman members of the Classical
lub will meet at 2 o'clock this after-
oon in room 103 University hall.
Fresh lit baseball players are asked
report at 1:45 o'clock this after-
oon at Ferry field.

Princeton: Life-saving medals will man gymnasium a land mark in that
be awarded to all students who take _ a of work in Ann Arbor.
the new course in life-saving. The oe4are the dancing started a drill
work is intended to better fit the men ys givm by the naval reserves. Pres-
for service in the army and navy. ,nt vry D. Hutchins and Mrs.
Colunbia; The gymnasium and si the grand march, after
services of the athletic staff have been th munsic swung into the first
offered to the government by the as e the evening. As additional
physical director. Recruiting and ex- eree, 12 young women danced the
ammnation will be carried on if the sailors' horn pipe, later a minuet was
offer is accepted. also executed. More than 300 tickets
Oho: Forty s Idents enr'led for vere sold at the door, in addition to
the reserve officers' course at ,Fort these already disposed of.
Benjamin Harrison during the first The rain floor of Barbour gymnas-
day of enlistment. Several men out- um was given over to Red Cross
side the university also signed the roll. boc _, wh re Red Cross nurses dis-
Cornell: The sum of $1S 0 has ' 1( favors, and refreshments. A
been donated within the last few days great many members of the faculty
t; purchase and equip ambulances for were present.
the new Cornell-Ithaca unit. As soon --
as arrangemnents are completed the I' : Il'ULA CL1B TO
squad will leave for France. i'T OF "I TS ' IG1't
Wisconsin: Sixty-sip: out of 401) ap-
plicants have been accepted for the There will be a meeting of the Up-
intensive military instruction course lee Iens5ia club at 7:15 o'clock this
nwo being organized. The drill will evening in the room at the south end
begin at 7 o'clock each morning. of the basement of Lane hall.
Minnesota: Three hundred girls of There will be important business
the university have enrolled in the tranma ted as well as the election of
Red Cross preparedness courses in- officers for the ensuing year.
stituted recently. Certificates will be -
awarded by the American Red Cross . P h1ised by Seniors of Cornell
to ,those successfully completing the Ithaca, N. ., April 27.-The sum
work. of $2,100 has been subscribed by mem-
Kansas: Members of the Kansas bers of the senior class to the class
Red Cross classes have been divided mnemorial fund. About half of the
into sections of 25 with a captain for seniors could not be reached during
each division. In this way each sec- the brief campaign, and the commit-
tion acts independently of the others tee will continue the project through
and has different work to do. There the mails in an effort to raise the ad-
are 250 girls in the course. ditional $1,300.
Iowa: Eleven more "rookies"
joined the faculty training corps of Princeton to Provide Camps for Boys
the Uiversity of Iowa this week. The Princetop, N. J., April '27.---Relief
total enrollment is now 50. work, will be carried on by Princeton's
summer camp this year. The plan is
Use the advertising columns of The to take care of the sons of enlisted
Michigan Daily in order to reach the j men by keeping them in fresh air
teat of AnnArbor's buyers.. camps for the summer.

It
lI
1
e
s'

ROOEELTARMY PLAN
VOTED DOWN IN HOUSE
CA lD ER EULOGIZES EX-PRESI-
DE'_NT WHILE SUPPORTING
VOL UN TEER PLAN
Washington,' April 27.-The Roose-
velt plan to raise a volunteer army
was defeated in the house today when
Representative Austin's amendment to
permit the colonel to raise a division
was voted down by 170 votes to 106.
Immedately the amendment was in-
troduced. Representative Gardner of
Masachusetts went to the front. to
lead the fight for it.
"The nation must mobilize Roose-
velt." Gardner declared. "Not to make
use of one of the greatest moral
forces the modern world has known
would be worse than negligence. For
the nation not to recognize and utilize
!Roosevelt's military genius and lead-
ship would be criminal neglect.
"Roosevelt's arrival among the
poilus at the front," Gardner declared,
"would do more to cheer the allies
and hearten civilization than anything
else on earth. Are we afraid that peo-
ple will say in selecting Roosevelt that
we play favorites, and are we so weak
e are afraid to make such discrim-
j tions if Roosevelt can help us, and
the others cannot?"
Representative Mann, Republican,
rated as favoring the volunteer army
system, came out clearly for the presi-
dent's selective draft plan during de-
be en the Roosevelt amendment.

REGENTS VOTE RETURN
TO CONFERENCE GAMES
(Continued from Page One.)
ule of contest-football in particular--
proved unsatisfactory.
Agitation has been held on the cam-
pus several times since the break.
The last was in 1913, when many stu-
dents voted against it in the now
famous campaign, widely known by
the kind of wording used in the
badges worn. Some probably were
against the return at that time due to
the fact that the 1914 schedule con-
tained a game with Harvard. ButI
Harvard did not offer to come west
in 1915, and this affected the spirit in
favor of a resumption.
The present decision is heartily
concurred in by the mass of students
and alumni. More than 90 per cent
of the total alumni who expressed
themselves, took the stand for the pro-
position instead of against it.
Michigan returned yesterday to her
natural field of competition. Any one
who has witnessed a gridiron tussle
between Michigan and Minnesota, and
Michigan opposed by Cornell or Penn-
sy will readily agree. The old rivalry
which goes to make up any sport
classic between two well-matched and
equally strong outfits was missing in
the eastern games. It was not where
Michigan belonged.
Matters Not Discussed
The matter of the resumption of ath-
letics, suspended since April 4, was
not taken up by the Regents. Neither
was any action taken in regard to
this year's interscholastics. It is
more than likely that the athletic
board will make a definite decision3
concerning the annual high and prep
school meet within the next few days.
A viation to Be Taught at Washington
Seattle, Wash., April 27.-Aviation
will be added to the military curricu-
lum of the University of Washington.t
The course is to be one of aeroplane
construction and will be open to

M AJESTIC
3---SHOWS lDAILY 3
3-7-and--8:30 P. X.
LAST TIMES OF THE GREAT-
EST FILM OF MODERN TIMES
Bern hardt
in
'Mothers of France'
DON'T FAIL TO SEE IT
It TellA the Real War Story
MOTHERS OF AMERICA
SHOULD SEE IT
Matinees, 10 Cents
P e Nights, 1IiCents
BOARD MOVES TO INSPECT
STUDENT ROOMING HOUSES
(Continued from Page One.)
Bachelor of Science-Benjamin Hol-
ton, Battle Creek; Jane Stevenson,
Richmond, Ind.; Medard Welch, Chi-
cago, Ill.; Robert J. Hall,. Detroit.
Bachelor of Science in Forestry-
Ludwig Lasko, New York City.
Bachelor of Laws-Richard Munter,
Spokane, Wash.
Graduate in Pharmacy-Sidney G.
Vedder, LaHarpe, Ill.
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy-
Ethel Person, Ann Arbor; Robert
Brown, Pigeon.
Ray Clarence Friesner, Bremen, O.,
was appointed to the Cole fellowship
in botany.
Rent a good Eastman Kodak, 10c
a day -Fresh Eastman Films -open
every evening to 9. Lyndon's Kodak
Shop, 719 N. University Ave. After
hours drop films through tube at the
door.-Adv. Sat
Dance to music by Varsity sextette
at Armory tonighit.-Ady.

it

fPzo±'. .. F. Bailey Speaks in Detroit
Detroit, April 27.-Prof. B. F. Bailey
o lie electrical engineering depart-
ment of the University of Michigan
spoke to the Detroit-Ann Arbor sec-,
tion of the American Institute of Elec-
trical Engineers on "Polyphase Alter-
nating Current Motors" at the Detroit
Engineering society rooms last even-
tug. This is the last of a series of
round table discussions given monthly
throughout the winter on problems

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