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April 27, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-27

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THE WEATHER

PROBABLY FAIR
TODAY

i~tk

Clatt

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

,1

._....

VOL. XXVII. No. 144.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 1917.

PRICE FIVE C

BALL TONIGHT FOR
AID OFRED CROSS
Naval Reserves to Be Guests at Dance
in Gymnasiums To-
night
UNIVERSITY WOMEN PRESENT
SEVERAL SPECIAL DANCES:
Red Cross Will Have Booth in Hall
to Enroll Members in Local
Chapter'
The naval reserve exhibition will
mark the opening, and the sounding
of taps the close of te Red Cross
benefit ball to be held tonight in Wa-
terman and Barbour gymnasiums.
Following the naval reserve exhibi-
tion drill at .9 o'clock, will be the
grand march led by the reception com-
mittee. Two general dances will fol-
low, and then a "Sailor's Hornpipe"
will be danced by 14 women of the
University who have been trained by
Miss Alice Evans. Later in the even-
ing a minuette will be danced by some
of the University women in colonial
costume.
American Flags Used to Decorate
Only American flags will be used
for decoration, and a large number
have been loaned to the decoration
committee for the occasion. Two or-
chestras will supply the music, which1
isto be under the direction of Mr. E.
J. Fischer. Company I will come in
uniform. Those who have taken the
Red Cross courses are to wear uni-
forms of white with white caps bear-
ing the Red Cross.
The reception committee consists of
President Harry B. Hutchins and Mrs.1
Hutchins, representing the University;
Mayor Ernst Wurster and Mrs. Wur-
ster, representing the city; Dr. L. P.I
Hall and Mrs. Hall, representing the
local chapter of the Red Cross; Mr.
and Mrs. M. A. Ives of the finance com-
mittee, and Mr. and Mrs. George W.
Millen of the ball committee.
Red Cross Booth Will Enroll Membersx
There will be a Red Cross booth ine
Barbour gymnasium where Mr. Carlc
F. Braun, the treasurer of the local1
chapter of the Red Cross, will be ready
to enroll members. Mrs. S. M. Bracer
will preside at a souvenir booth. Re-
freshments will be served in the rooms
of the Women's league. These willt
have to be purchased, as the object ofN
the ball is to secure funds for thec
activities of the Red Cross. Thea
money secured through the ball will
be expended in military and civilian
relief work in this country.t
The women who will dance thei
"Sailor's Hornpipe" -are as follows:t
Helen Champion, '17, Marion E. Chris-n
tiancy, '20, Mrs. Coons, Elizabeth O.x
Hall, '18, Helen McAndrew, '19, La-9
vinia G. McBride, '18, Frances Merri-
man, '20, Genevieve O'Leary, '16, Ellat
Rasmussen, '19, L. Roelloffs, Dorothyt
Sample, '20, Marion Sharp, '19, MarieE
von Walthausen, '18, and Dorothy Wil-
liams; '20.
The minuette will be danced by the
following University women: Ruth
Ely, '19, Margaret Bright, '19, Carrie
E. Baxter, '17, Esther Lamb, '18,
Helen Davis, '19, Milda Tosenhaus,
Helen Pratt, '17, and Julia Van Lee-
wan, '17.
Committees Report at 8 O'clock
All members of the floor committee1
and the finance committee, and theire
wives, the ladies who have taken thet
Red Cross courses, and others who

have consentedto assist the floor com-
mittee during the evening, are re-1
quested to report at 8 o'clock at the
reception booth in the Barbour gym-k
nasium to receive their badges and
final instructions.t
ARRANGE TO ENABLE STUDENTSr
TO SECURE MICHIGANENSIANS
Arrangements have been made bys
members of the Michiganensian board
so that those leaving school before
the date of publication may, by de-
positing the sum of $2.50 together with
their coupons, have the book mailed'
to their home address.
The address must be left at the Ann
Arbor Press building any time before
the appearance of the annual, which
will be about May 15. It has been in
the hands of the printer for some time.
Fifty pages more than the 1916 edition
will be found, making the total near-

Colonel House in
CapitolThursday
Marshal Joffre Invited to Appear in
Senate for Presentation, by
Vice-President
Washington, April 26.-Colonel E.
M. House came to Washington today,
and was among those present at the
White House dinner for the French
commissioners tonight. He had lunch-
eon with the president this noon.
Secretary of War Baker and Chief
of Staff General Scott returned the
French commssion's greetings this
afternoon in a formal call upon
Marshal Joffre, while Secretary Dan-
iels, with Admiral Benson, chief of
naval operations, called on French Ad-
miral Chocheprat.
Shortly before the senate convened
today ex-Premier Viviani visited Vice-
president Marshal in his offices at the
capitol. After hand shaking and greet-
ings the vice-president invited him to
return and be presented to the sen-
ate. He specially urged that he bring
Marshal Joffre with him.
"I am sure the senators would like
to see such a fighter as he is," Marshal
said.
FRENCH CPTUR1U3
TEUTONS IN ONE SWOOP
ENTIRE BAVARIAN REGIMENT,
INCLUDING OFFICERS,
SURRENDERS
By Henry Wood
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
With the French Armies in the
Field, April 26.-Thirteen hundred
German prisoners and 180 machine
guns were captured in one swoop of
French forces around Ville-Aux-Bois,
according to a complete tally given
out at general headquarters today.
The total of all captures in the fight-
ing around Ville-Aux-Bois was 11 can-
non and 3,200 prisoners, including one
entire Bavarian regiment, with all its
officers except the colonel. The
French envelopment occurred April
17, but until today the censor with-
held details.
The French swept so suddenly
around the Ville-Aux-Bois positions
that the Germans imprisoned within
were taken entirely unaware. Just
one solitary German avoided capture,
and he bravely stuck behind until he
could drag away his machine gun.
If it had not been for the fact that
the colonel of the Bavarian regiment
inclosed by the French was back to
the rear of the German lines in his
headquarters he, too, would have fallen
prisoner. Not another officer escaped.
The Germans hurriedly rushed a Prus-
sian regiment to take the place of
the captured Bavarian unit, and did
their best to retake the wood, but
without success.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE
STUDENTS WANTED
Federal Office Desires Services of In-
terpreters for Duration
of War
Students who can use a foreign
language fluently and who desire to
enter the federal service as interpre-
ters for the government can do so by
communicating with the chief clerk
of the state department, Washington,

D. C.
The above information was received
by the University authorities yester-
day in a letter from Colonel Bethel. of
the judge advocate's department. This
will afford valuable employment for
many students for the duration of the
war, especially for those who are in
any way barred from entering any of
the branches of the active military
service.

HOLD MEETING FOR MEN
SEEKING WORK ON FARM
DEAN JOHN R. EFFINGER TO
SPEAK TO STUDENTS TO-
MORROW
Students desirous to go on the farm,
and especially those who have had any
experience in farming, are invited to
attend a meeting at 3 o'clock tomorrow
afternoon in the Natural Science
auditorium at which Dean John R. Ef-
finger will explain the subject of
granting credits to students who wish
to do such work.
The meeting is called by the food
and farm products committee of the
National Security league of which
Prof. William H. Hobbs is chairman.
Professor Hobbs stated yesterday
that he had the promise of Mr. W. E.
Underdown, county agent of the gov-
ernor's food preparedness commission,
and manager of the Huron Farms
company, to be present and explain
how students could be of value in aid-
ing the increase of food productions
by going on the farm.
The sentiment of the literary facul-
ty at its meeting last Monday night
was favorable towards granting cred-
its to students desiring to work on the,
farm.
GARGOYLE PRESENTS
ADVICE TO MILITIA

MUOR CASTLE TO DRILL
THOSE ENTERING CAMPS

Government Gets
Low Cost Steel
Manufacturers to Fill War Orders for
United States 33 to 51 Per
Cent Below Quotations

I APPLICATION

OF MEDICAL

OF.

FICERS HAS BEEN
MADE

Men expecting to enter officers'
training camps will start drill today
under the command of Major Charles
W. Castle on Ferry field. The time
set for the first drill is 4:15 o'clock.
Major Castle has already made ap-
plication to headquarters in Chicago
for a medical officer of the reserve
corps to be assigned to Ann Arbor, as
a member of the board for examining
candidates who wish to enter training
camps.
As soon as an officer is detailed to
Ann Arbor the candidates can report
to him for physical examination, after
which they will be examined by Major
Castle in the boxing room in Water-
man gymnasium.
Applications of 28 men have been
referred to Major Castle. He advises
the applicants to procure the Moss
"Manual of Military Training," and
the "Primer for Candidates for the Of-
ficers' Reserve Corps." The latter may
be procured at a State street book
store and a new consignment of the
book by Moss has been .ordered.
SENIOR LAWYERS
IN CREASE DANCE

Humorous Magazine Also Scores'
Hounds" In Issue Out
Today

"Tea Invitations

to Annual Affair In Form
of Legal Sub-
poenas

. "Before you earn the title of "tar,"
you must first be "pitched about the
ocean," and "keep a memorandum of
the anchor's weight, and you won't
have to weigh it every time you leave
port." are two bits of advice offered
to the naval reserves by the current
issue of the Gargoyle. -
The humor magazine goes on sale at
noon today, and is four pages larger
than the last number. Eighteen hun-
dred copies have been printed, and a
ready sale is confidently expected.
"Tea Hounds," the war, co-educa-
tion, the whims and foibles of the cam-
pus furnish the marks for epigram and
jest. Snappy verse and clever draw-
ings fill the number.

MUST ENROLL

SOON

Engineers Wishing to Join Regiment
Are to Sign Up Before May 1
Men wishing to enroll 'in the en-
gineering regiment must sign up be-
fore May 1. The committee in charge
of military affairs in the engineering
college has decided that no more men
will be taken into the companies after
that date on account of the difference
in training.
There will be a meeting of the of-
ficers in the engineering corps at 3:30,
o'clock today in room 268 of the En-
gineering building. All members of
the engineering college who are drill-
ing are to report at 4:15 o'clock on
Ferry field.
PLAN TELEPHONE COURSES FOR
CURRICULA AT IOWA STATE
Ames, Ia., April 26.-Telephone
courses have been planned for next
fall's curricula at Iowa State univer-
sity. Men from any part of the state,
whether students or not, will be al-
lowed to enroll. Two years will be the
length of the courses.
COMPULSORY DRILL FOR LIT
STUDENTS IN IOWA UNIVERSITY
Iowa City, Ia., April 26.-All men
in the literary college will be compell-
ed to take five hours of military train-
ing weekly as the result of a recent
ruling of the faculty. Drill will begin
Monday.

The annual senior law Crease dance,
the biggest social event of the year
in the Law school, will be held from
9 until 1 o'clock tonight at the Union.
Shook's orchestra from Detroit will
furnish the music. The hall has been
decorated in the national colors. The
t:reas, the humor publication for the
occasion, came owffthebpress a few
days ago and will be distributed
among those present during the in-
termission in the dance program. The
invitations to the dance are in the
form of subpoenas and those not sent
out yesterday will be mailed this
morning.
The dance is entirely informal. The
chaperons are Dean Henry M. Bates
and Mrs. Bates, Prof. John R. Rood
and Mrs. Rood, and Prof. Willis G.
Stoner and Mrs. Stoner. Six tickets
remained unsold last night and may
be obtained at the Union desk today.
NAVAL MILITIA EXPECTS TO BE
SUMMONED FOR DUTY SOON
Since the receipt of Captain Moffat's
letter Wednesday from the Great
bakes training camp telling of the
added training facilities now at the
disposal of the naval militia, the
Seventh and Eighth divisions of the
reserve feel certain that their sum-
mons to the camp will come very soon.
The officers' quarters are besieged
daily by large numbers of applicants
for membership in the divisions, but
the membership has been closed and
no more applications will be consid-
ered. The two units will go into
training with no substitutions in the
personnel unless a few men are forced
out by a final physical examination.
The substitutions, if any, will be made
out of a large number of men on the
waiting list who have had their names
in for some time.
EXAMINATION QUESTIONS FOR
ASSISTANT PAYMASTER HERE
Specimen questions asked in the ex-
amination of candidates for appoint-
ment as assistant paymaster in the
navy have been received at the reg-
istrar's office in University hall. Lists
of these questions may be obtained by
students interested in the examinations
ba application at the office.

New York, April 26.-Steel manu-
facturers of the country vi111 fill the
government's war orders at prices
ranging from 331-3 to 512-3 per cent
below the present market quotations.
At a meeting of heads of the United
States Steel corporation, Republic
Steel, and Midvale Steel today it was
decided to fill the government's orders
for bars at $2.50 base per hundred
pounds, for plates at $2.90, and for
structural shapes at $2.50.
Today's Pittsburg prices for these
materials are $3.75 for bars, $6.00 for
plates, and $.00 for shapes. This put
the rate on bars 33 1-3 per cent below
the market, plates 51 2-3, and shapes
371-2 per cent below. The prices to
the government were fixed by a gen-
eral committee appointed by the Amer-
ican Iron and Steel institute in con-
ference with United States representa-
tives. They were unanimously ap-
proved by today's meeting.
W1 EISB, CAPIGN NETS
$5,500 COLLECTED OR PLEDGED
ACCORDING TO FINAL
REPORTS
The spider's web is spun.
At 10 o'clock last night when the
last team captain had turned in his
report of the subscriptions gained for
the "Y" campaign, it was found that
$5,500 had been collected or pledged
to the cause of war work, Busrah and
the maintenance of Lane and New- ~
berry, hal. Of this amout, $1,6i9
was secured through the efforts of
women working under the auspices of
the Y. W. C. A. The team of Ethel
Vail, '17, was accorded first honors.
Seven thousand dollars was the goal1
set, and it is expected that when the,
remaining fraternities and societies
are heard from, the deficit will be but,
slight.
At the social gathering held after
the meeting, N. C. Fetter, local secre-
tary of the Y. M. C. A., and W. T.
Adams, '17, general chairman, ex-
pressed themselves as being well
pleased with the results.
INLANDER NOW OUT
Dr. Jonathan F. Scott Pays Tribute to
President Wilson in Article
Dr. Jonathan F. Scott in his article,
"Why We Are at War," which ap-
pears in the April number of the In-
lander, out today, pays a tribute to
President Wilson.
"He has set the American people a'
wonderful example of restraint and
self-control under the most trying con-..
ditions. He has shown himself cap-
able of that higher moral courage to
which the hot temper of the passing
moment may have accorded little de-
ference, but which history will not
fail to appreciate," writes Dr. Scott
in conclusion,
Other articles, stories, poems, and
significant editorials dealing with
varsity athletics, student living condi-
tions, and the proposed point system
appear in the number.
ZIEGER, VARSITY FOOTBALLER,
IS ENTERING TRAINING CAMP
Harold M. Zieger, '17, the varsity1
football player who brought victory
to Michigan in last fall's tilt with;
Syracuse, left this morning for Fort
Riley, Kan., where he wil go into1

training for the officers' reserve corp.
He is a member of Phi Delta Theta
fraternity.

CERCLE FRNA/
PLAY isSUCCES!
Leland Thompson, '18, and Margan
Kerr, '18, Take Leading
Roles
NOTE FORMS BASIS OF PLOT
IN "11E5 PATTES DE MOUUHE
Production Given in Sarah Caswel
Angell Hall Last
Night
Characterized by splendid dramati
talent, clever situations, and pith
lin'es, and with a plot interwoven wit'
unexpected complications, Victorie:
Sardou's "Les Pattes de Mouche" wa
presented in Sarah Caswell Angel
hall last night by Cercle Francais.
Leland Thompson, '18, as Prospe
Block, and Margaret Kerr, '18, as Su
zanne, in the leading roles, interprete
their lines with cleverness, and wer
supported by a cast which showed it
dramatic ability in every respect.
Clarissa Played by Mrs. A. C. Weave
Prosper, returning from a thre
yeafs' visit in China, finds Clariss
(Mrs. A. C. Weaver, grad.), his forme
lover, married to Vanhove (Jaco'
Braude, '18). He has now turned hi
affections toward Marthe (Mario:
Sharpe, '19) since he must marry t
receive an inheritance from his uncl<
Three years before, when he ha
left for the Orient, Clarissa had writ
ten Prosper a note telling him tha
she wanted to marry him, despite th
fact that her mother was about V
take her to Paris to wed Vanhove
This note had not been disturbed dur
ing the three years, since Clarissa'
house had been unoccupied during thi
time.
Prosper Secures Note Causing Troubl
Prosper now secures possession o
the note, and intends to use it to forc
Clarissa to advocate his marriage t
Marthe, who, however, is loved b:
Paul (. F. Kuijala, '19). Suzanne
to help her sister, Clarissa, out of th
difficulty that she now finds hersel
in, due to the fact that Prosper ha
the missive and Vanhove suspects hi
wife of being in love with Prosper
secures the note from his room afte
a search in which Clarissa' has as
sisted. Prosper enters the room an
after a play of wit Suzanne succeed:
in making him light a candle wit]
it. He then throws the half burne
note out of the window.
Just after the note had been found
however, Vanhove entered Prosper'
apartments, forcing Clarissa to hid
in Prospeirb chamber, and to dispe
his fears, Suzanne had to admit to hin
that she and not her sister was Pros
per's lover before his journey t
China. Vanhove then goes away de
Glaring that he will bring about :
reconciliation and marriage betwee
Suzanne and Prosper.
Note Comes Finally to Paul
Prosper and Suzanne are still try
ing to gain possession of the covete
letter, when it finally falls into th
hands of Paul, who uses it to write a
love letter to Marthe. This letter i
delivered by mistake to Colomb
(Dorothy Gruss, '19), the dreaded wif
of Paul's guardian.
Meanwhile Vanhove has an inter
view with Prosper in order to recon
cile him with his supposed forme
sweetheart, Suzanne, when Thirior
Paul's guardian (George Wilner, '17)
attempts to discover the author of th
letter, which he supposes to have bee:
written to his wife. Clarissa's un

fortunate letter is written on the othe
side of the paper and is in danger o
being discovered. Prosper, in order t
save the situation, therefore pretend
to have written it to Suzanne. Th
supposed former sweethearts are ap
parently reunited, and:they are burn
ing the dangerous scrap of paper a
the curtain falls.
H. L. Davis, '17, gave a vocal se
lection between acts.
COLLECT OLD SHOES TO SEND
TO EUROPE FOR FRENCH PEOPLE

ITHE "TEA HOVND" NUMBER OF

T E

OAR

OYLE

Philadelphia, Pa., April 26.--Hi
dreds of pairs of old shoes, collec
from students of the University
Pennsylvania duringthe annual "r
Clothes Day," will be seit to Frar
for the use of the civilian populati
Old clothes, shirts, and other artic
of apparel were sold in a mons
rummage sale at the university s
tlement house, at Twenty-sixth a
Lombard streets.

I COMES OUT TODAY Ii

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