100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 26, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M;

-IIGAN DAILY THUR'

THE DOC

TAKE YOUR
Amatuer Finishing to a Reliable Photographer
who has an established reputation and you will be assured of
Results that will not be a disappointment.
L Y N D 0 N ' S 719 N. University Ave

1 I

SPECIAL

SALE

ON

4

Established1905, and
Growing bigger and better every day.

You know in these times of so much style and whim
we still keep this broad toed sensible model stocked
heavily. It is still a big seller with us and if you
want to wear a shoe with room FOR FIVE TOES
-ask to see the
DOC MODEL
HOFFSTETTER'S
Walk-Over Boot Shop
115 S. Main St. 115 S. Main St.

SLIGHTLY

FRATERNITIES
We hav unsurpasssd ,accomodations for group photographs
MAIN STUDIOS
~- J~IA~J~(I1646-48 Broadwsy New York, N.Y

Perfect Portraiture

"Amateur Work Handled in a Pro-
fessional Way.
PHONEC 948-W

819 B. Liberty St.

GERMANS USE SMASHING
ATTACK ONWEST FRONT
HAIG REPORTS CAPTURE OF 3,000
PRISONERS SINCE MON-
DAY'S DRIVE
New York, April 25.-War develop-
ments today continued in favor of the
entente allies. Western front fight-
ing was reported by press correspond-
ents as being the most furious since
the days when Germany's war ma-
chine first started its march through
Belgium and northern France.
The Teutons were said to have re-.
sumed their former tactics of massed
attacks, counter-attacking furiously
and sacrificing thousands of lives in
desperate but futile attempts to halt
the big push of the Franco-British
armies.
The official statement today from
London, as based on Field Marshal
Haig's report, told of the capture of
3,000 German prisoners since Monday
and the continued advance of the
British forces between the Cojeul and
Scarpe rivers. Fifty-six officers were
numbered among the prisoners.
On the - front of nearly nine miles
from Oppy to Croisilles, fierce fighting
continued tonight. As a result of the
most recent British advances Ger-
man positions on the Wotan line are
said to be endangered"
Paris reported violent fighting along
most of the French front with slight
French progress in the Aisne and
Champagne sectors. Berlin announc-
ed the repulse of strong British at-
tacks and heavy losses of men for
the allies. The German statement
further reported the capture of 650
prisoners in German counter-attacks
and the destruction of 39 enemy aero-
planes and one captive balloon in air
engagements since Monday.
GRECIAN INDUSTRY
CAUSE OF SLAVERY

Pop. Mat. Wed. K April 23
Best .Seats $1.50 NighILi 5ots20
D ET R I to $2.
BERNARD SHAW'S COMEDY
"Getting Married"
ARCADE;
Shows at 8:00; 6:3e; a:ee; 9:3e
lso UAless Otherwise specifed.
Phone 6"M.
Thurs.-26-Joan Sawyer in "Love's
Law"; and Christie Comedy.
Fri.-27-Lionel Barrymore in "His
Father's Son" ; and Figman Com-
edy. irc.
Sat.-28-Lillian Walker in "Kittie
MacKay, and Mrs. Vernon Castle
in "Patria." 15c.

SHEEHAN

GOODS

IFA

Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, a:oo-3:3o; Evening, 6:45,
8:15, 9:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Tlhurs.-Fri.-2 6-27-Mae Murray in
"On Record." Also Paramount
Comedy. Evening 15c.
Sun.-Mon.-29-30-Marguerite Clark in
Sat.-28-Wm. S. Hart in "The Gun
Fighter." Also Triangle Comedy,
"His Deadly Undertaking." Even-
ing 15c.
"The Fortunes of Fifi." Also Holmes
Travels. ac.
Rae TheatreI

I

U

M..

1

SOILED

Put your order in NOW for those

ATHLETIC

DANCE PROGRAMS DE LUXE

& CO*

which you'll need for that

LOCKSMITHING---ELECTRIC REPAIRING
HIGHEST QUALITY
William W. Behringer
11 NICKELS ARCADE

FORMAL SPRING PARTY

-

I

mmm

'^-.

.!

WHAT'S GOING ON
Today
8 o'clock-Senior engineer - assem-
y in room 348 Engineering building.
4 o'clock-Deutscher Vereiu execu-
re board mneets in society rooms.
7 o'clock-Canadian club smoker at
ichigan Union.
7 o'clock-International relations
ass meets in room 302 University
11.
7:90 o'clock-Mortarboard meets at
ewberry residence.
7:30 o'clock-Bird club meeting in
om 355 Natural Science building.
8:15 o'clock-Cercle Francas play
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Tomorrow
3 o'clock-Anti-tuberculosis society
sets in room 435 Natural Science
ilding.
7:30 o'clock-Latin-American club
Pets in Lane hall.
9 o'clock-Senior engineer dance at
mory.
9 o'clock-Crease dance at the Mich-
aeUnion.
9 o'clock-Red Cross ball in Bar-
ur and Waterman gymnasiums.
U-Notices
There will be a rehearsal of the cast
"Merry Wives of Windsor" tonight
University hall as follows: Act 4,
ones 2, 4, and 6 at 6:45 o'clock; act
at 8 o'clock.
There will be a rehearsal of the All-
sh Mandolin club at 8 o'clock to-
ght in room 205, north wing, Uni-
rsity hall. Dues will be collected.
The Al-engineer band will rehearse
7:15 o'clock tonight in room 348
gineerng building. All drums and
es are asked to turn out.
The Choral Union will rehearse at
'clock tonight in the School of Mu-
The soph lit baseball team will prac-
e at 4 o'clock this afternoon on
nith Ferry field.
Tryouts for the senior lit baseball
um will meet at 3 o'clock this after-
on on south Ferry field for practice.
practice game may be held.
IEPARATIONS PROGRESSING
FOR SOPH PROM HELD MAY 11
Preparations are progressing rap-
y for the informal soph prom to
held Friday night, May 11, at the
mory. Wright's orchestra from Co-
mbus will furnish the music.
The chaperons are: Dean Mortimer
Cooley and Mrs. Cooley, Prof. John
Allen and'Mrs. Allen, Prof. John
Brumm and Mrs. Brumm, Prof.
uis A. Strauss and Mrs. Strauss,
d Prof. Lewis M. Gram and Mrs.
am.
Committee Favors Navy Increase
Washington, April 25.- The house
val committee this afternoon re-
rted favorably a bill urged by See-
;ary Daniels to increase the navy
>m 87,000 to 150,000 men, and the
rine corps from 17,400 to 30,000

ROOSEVLT WILL GIE
THE SPEECH OF HIS LIFE'
COLONEL WRITES LETTER TO SEC-
RETARY BAKER IN REPLY
TO REFUSAL
Chicago, April 25.- Col. Theodore
Roosevelt will arrive in Chicago on
Saturday to deliver what he says will
be the speech of his life. Plans for
his reception were completed yester-
day.
The colonel will be welcomed at the
depot by a committee of 250 citizens,
members of military organizations,
and foreign societies. He will be es-
corted to the Congress hotel by the
famous Black Horse troop of Culver
Militaty academy, 100 jackies from the
Great Lakes Naval Training station,
and a section of the high school volun-
teers of America.
Colonel Roosevelt at noon will at-
tend a luncheon at the Hotel La Salle,
at which Governor Lowden will speak.
In the evening he speaks at the amphi-
theater at the Stock Yards. H. N.
Merrick of Armour & company, presi-
dent of the National Security league,
will preside. Governor Lowden will
be one of the speakers.
Washington, D. C., April 25.-Theo-
dore Roosevelt has written a strong
letter to Secretary of War Baker in
answer to a letter which the secretary
is said to have written to Colonel
Roosevelt refusing to accept the colo-
nel's offer to raise an army division
to go to France immediately.
Although this letter could not be ob-
tained from the secretary of war today
and since Colonel Roosevelt did not
wish to make it public without Secre-
tary Baker's consent, it may be that
the public will be deprived of the joy
of reading what is said to be one of
the strongest letters Colonel Roose-
velt ever wrote.
DEVELOP ENTHUSIASM AMONG
WOMEN AT GENWA MEETING
Geneva club entertained a large
group of University women last night
at a social meeting whose purpose
was the development of enthusiasm
for the conference of college Y. W. C.
A.'s which takes place every summer
at Lake Geneva, Wis.
Me-iung Ting, '20M, spoke on the
fourfold benefits to be derived from
Lake Geneva and similar camps: The
religious inspiration, the vocational
information and stimulus, the making
of new friendships, and the contact
with intelligent college women of all
types and nationalities. A description
of the fun and work of the conference
was given by Clarissa Vyn, '18, and
Helen Brown, '18, led in singing the
old Geneva songs. -
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merehant Tailors. State
St. ;

= TODAY =
METRO WONDER PLAY
A Wife By Proxy"
With MABLE TALLIAFERRO
11 PURPLE MASK"

j The Mayer-Schairer Company

Stationers -Printers-Binders--Engravers

112 S. Main Street

Admission ioc

U -

=

I

..

A

Spring Hats
Rcady
FOR YOUR
INSPECTION

$17 and More $17 and More
CLOT ! ES THAT FIT !
We make such clothes. Not only do they fit, but they are also
of the latest spring styles. The,., too, every student wants
quality. You will get it at
Ward's Kassy Kut Klothes
F. W. ALLEN, Manager 118 E. Huron Street

Prof. W. S. Ferguson Says
Masters Aided Servants in
Their Work

That

The ONLY place in Ann Arbor
to get REAL Hat Service.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard. Next to the Delta
Cor. Packard and State

"Industrial expansion -in ancient
Greece was the cause of the slave
trade and not the effect," said Prof.
W. S. Ferguson of Harvard university
yesterday in his lecture, "Greece, Past
and Present; Economic Contrasts."
"It cannot be said that slaves were
exploited, inasmuch as their masters
aided them to produce the works
which now exist, even though in
ruins.
"The life and manners of the peo-
ple is now radically different from
what it once was. Instead of using
the amphitheater, the cafe is chosen
as the scene of their amusement.
"Delos is the Pompeii of Greece.
Here and also at Amphipolis, it can
be seen how greatly the modern dif-
fers from the ancient. The traveler
is stirred with pity when he gazes at
the ruins of the ancient civilization.
Sparta was noted in antiquity for its
lack of durable monuments, and yet
a large portion of her former grand-
eur still remains."
ROOT MAY REPRESENT U. S.
IN NEW RUSSIAN REPUBLIC
Washington, April 25.-Elihu Root
will head the American commission
to Russia if he will consent to under-
take the duty. It became known to-
day that the president has completed
the selection of the principal mem-
bers of the mission.
The names of the men tentatively
chosen to make up the commission will
not be made public until they have
been formally requested to serve and
have accepted.
It was said today, however, that the
men whom the president has in mind
are all distinguished in their particu-
lar lines and together will make up a
commission which will indicate to the
Russian government and people the
deep interest in their welfare held by'
the American government.
Among those besides Mr. Root whose
names have been mentioned in the pre-
liminary discussions are Oscar Straus,
former secretary of commerce and la-
bor; Edward N. Hurley, former chair-
man of the trade commission, and
Henry Morgenthau, former ambas-
sador to Turkey.

12,000,000 MEN TO
START FARM DRIVE
Secretary of Labor Wilson Announces
Plans of Government
for Summer
Washington, April 25.-Plans for

p
CHAIRMAN TE OA' AJESTIC
CO1ITTEE MAKES PLEDGE

E at

Rev. Caroline Bartlett Crane Will
No Potatoes Until Spring
Crop Is Planted

SARn
SAAHBRNAR.

supplying 2,000,000 workers for the
country's farms this summer were an-
nounced today by Secretary of Labor
Wilson. Working with the agriculture
department, the labor department's
employment service will comb the
country for men to till the soil. A
preliminary census has disclosed that
some 2,000,000 men will be needed.
Orders went from the labor depart-
ment today to 20 zone offices and 90
employment stations scattered through
the country to begin preparations for
finding that number of men. The
first efforts are expected to produce
from half a million to a million.
Assist Workers
The vast army of farm workers to
be mobilized will be assisted by a
great army of boy workers, plans for
whose mobilization were completed
by the labor department yesterday.
"It is hoped," the labor department
announcement says, "that with the as-
surance these arrangements give of
ample and steady supply of labor, the
farmers of the United States will
largely expand their planting opera-
tions. The department of agriculture
will find holes in the labor supply and
the department of labor will be free
to extend its fullest powers in locat-
ing workers to fill them. In this way
we trust that a maximum of result at
a minimum of time and effort expend-
ed may be expected."
Plan Survey
The farming survey by the agricul-
ture department will be made largely
by' thousands of county agents and
agritultural demonstrators. Co-opera-
tion will be given by state agricultural
institutions, other state agencies, vol-
untary associations, and individual
farmers who are willing to help.
Rugs perfectly cleaned, washed, and
sized without injury. Koch & Henne. ft

1 i

Kalamazoo, Mich., April 25.--'I
pledge myself not to eat any potatoea
until after the spring crop is all in."
This is the pledge the women of
Michigan are being asked to take by
the Rev. Caroline Bartlett Crane, state
chairman of the Michigan woman's
committee for patriotic service. Mrs.
Crane has started a state-wide move-,;
ment to secure seed potatoes for the
farmers and has established a clear-
ing house for seed potatoes in this
city.
Mrs. Crane, who is an authority on
ty sanitation, and meat inspection
and is ofttimes called "the municipal
housekeeper," says: "We cannot af-
ford to eat seed potatoes. No matter
if you are a billionaire, you cannot
afford to eat them. No one can eat
seed potatoes at this time."

WOMEN AMD CHILDREN TO
ENLIST IN FOOD CAMPAIGN
Washington, April 25. - A nation-
wide movement to enlist all women
and children in the food production
campaign was set afoot today by the
board of managers of the National
Congress of Mothers and Parent-
Teacher associations. Mrs. Henry
Harmon of Vermont, chairman of the
farm and garden committee, was ap-
pointed to travel as organizer and in-
structor in co-operation with the de-
partment of agriculture.

IN
"I IERS OF FRANCE"
Written by Jean Richepin
Directed by Louis Mercanton
The attraction you must not miss.
A real historical event. The appear-
ance of the divine Sarah Bernhardt
in the supreme photodrama of the
great war. Dramatic artistry at its
best.
MATINEES ....................10C
NIGHTS ....................... 15c
CERCLE FRANCAIS PRESENTS
PLAY 'LES PATTES DE MOUCHE'

Women's League to Hold Mass Meeting (Continued from Page One)
At the annual mass meeting of the of the note. Prosper, however, proves
Woman's league at 4 o'clock Friday, hinself and announces that 4he let-
April 27, in Barbour gymnasium, a re- ter was written by him to Suzanne.
sume of the work done during the past Tic kets will be on sale from 9
year including reports of all commit- o'clocik until noon and from 3 to 6
tees and officers, will be read. There o'cloci: today, at Wahr's. The prices
will be dancing and refreshments. of the seats are 50 cents, 75 cents, and
$1.00. Fifty cents discount will be
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Plac#,, allowed to holders of Cercle Francais
611 E. William St. fE members ship cards.

Try The Daily for service.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan