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April 26, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CTHU

TART CAMPAIGN TO
COLLECTCLASS DUES
LEASURERS AND COMMITTEES
COMBINE IN EFFORT TO
CLEAR UP DEBT

For perhaps the first time in the
story of the University, a concen-
ated effort is being made by the
asurers of the four classes in the
erary college for the collection of
Las dues. Several committees head-
by the class treasurers have already
en appointed and will push through
vigorous campaign until sufficient
ids have been collected to clear
all class indebtedness.
Several sub-committees, including
>se of fraternity house representa-
es, dormitory representatives and
mmitteemen at large will be united
the campaign.
Por years indebtedness to the class
8 been cleared up just before grad-
;ion by means of a lump payment
the senior class treasurer. This
s proven unsatisfactory from sev-
.1 standpoints. It has been impos-
le in the past to keep perfectly
urate records of class expenditures,
ing to the fact that a different in-
abent filled the treasurer's office'
successive years. Debts contracted"
the class, following out the old
eme, could not be finally cleared
until the graduation of the mem-
s.
'he committee of class treasurersl
Ends to clear up such conditions
ough the present campaign. The
ss , dues, while insignificant in
unt during each year, amount to
ubstantial sum at the end of fourI
rs and the collection at that timei
auch more difficult because of thisI
raternity house delegates will beI
ointed today, and the campaign
be well under way by tonight.-
lhe plan works out successfully thisI
r, it will be an annual event, fort
s much favored by the faculty and
dent council.
RMAN BABIES CHIEF t
CAUSE OF PRESENT WAR
d. E. R. Turner Says Teutons Hadc
No Place for Ex-t
pansiona

War Ban Appears
In Nid- West City
Saloons, Pool Halls, and "Movies" in
Locality of Flour Mills Or-
dered Shut Down
St. Paul, Minn., April 25.-Minne-
sota s public safety commission or-
dered all saloons, pool halls, and mo-
tion picture houses in certain sections
of the city closed today as its first
war measure. Mayor Van Lear is di-
rected to revoke all licenses on May
1 for those businesses operating in the
prescribed territory.
In this district are the large flour,
mills which will have to supply flour,
to most of the United States and the,
allies. Numerous skirmishes between
guardsmen and alleged spies in this
center lead the commission to estab-
lish the order as a measure of mili-
tary expediency.

1,000 TICKETS-SOLD FOR
RED CRDSS BALL1 FRIDAY

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WOMEN
IN

TAKING WORK TO
UNIFORM; GIRLS
DANCE MINUET

APPEAR
TO

More than 1,000 tickets have been
sold for the Red Cross ball to be
held in Waterman and Barbour gym-
nasiums Friday night, and indications
are that many more will be sold be-
fore that date. Two orchestras will
furnish music.
The grand march will start at 9
o'clock, following which the reception
committee will hold an informal re-
ception in the central booth. Two
minuets, "The Green Sleeves," and "A
Sailor's Hornpipe," will be danced by
young women of the University who
have been training under Miss Alice
Evans for the past several weeks.
Women who have been taking the
Red Cross work will be present in
uniform and the naval reserves and
Company I are also being urged to
attend in uniform.
The ball will be entirely informal
and refreshments will be sold from
booths. Tickets cost 50 cents and are
on sale at the Farmers and Mechanics
bank on State street.

BOOKS WORTH READING

Scott Nearing of the University of
Toledo, who is to preach in the Baptist
church next Sunday, has written a
timely book entitled, "Income."
This book is an eloquent plea for
a just economic system in which those
who do the world's work shall reap
the full fruit of their labor. It makes
a serious effort for a fair division of
the social product between those who
Evork and those who own the means of
production.
In making his estimates, Professor
Nearing places on one hand all in-
comes derived as a reward for person-
al effort or service, and on the other,
all inicomes derived through owner-
ships, whether it be called profit, in-
terest, or rent.
What Dr. Nearing proposes is a
new classification "based on function
rather than on tradition."
The book is a valuable contribution
to the arsenal of the social reformer
due to the mass of data bearing upon
the distribution of social income
among different classes of society. The
author has ransacked official reports
of the federal and state governments
and has brought together units of
hitherto unrelated data. By supplying
what seem to be well-founded and, on
the whole, conservative estimates to
fill the gaps in the official reports, he
has been able to arrive at an approxi-
mate estimate of the respective shares
that the workers and property owners
receive from the nation's annual
bounty.
The book is written in simple, read-
able language, so that those who have
not studied economics at universities
are able to understand it.
Engineering News

Lost Marble Holds Up Library Work
Preparations for moving into the
new reading room have already been
started in the Library, although it is
not definitely known when the new
building will be completed.
Work is being delayed by the freight
congestion in the country. This has
caused a consignment of marble in-
tended for the stacks to be side-track-
ed somewhere between Buffalo and
Ann Arbor. The marble was shipped
from Vermont, April 10.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

WILL ANNOUNCE INTERCLASS
BASEBALL SCHEDULE TODAY
Games in the interclass baseball
league will be announced, this noon,
when the schedule will be given out
by the athletic association. Up to last
night only eight teams had been enter-
ed, but several more are expected to
appear in the complete list.
Saturday is the date set for the be-
ginning of play, if the weather and the
drillers on Ferry field are agreeable.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

1857 Dry Goods, Furniture and Women's Fashions 1917

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Princeton: No action has been tak-
en by the senior class to provide a
memorial fund owing to the unsettled
condition among the members of the'
class because of the war.
Yale: A fund of $15,000 has been
raised by the Yale club of New York
City for the Yale aerial observation
unit. The fund will be used for the
purchase of two balloons and equip-
ment.
Kansas: The number of students
withdrawing from the university to
enter military organizations or to fol-
low the plow now number 140. Many
who have withdrawn without the pro-
per authorization may not receive
their semester's credits, according to
Registrar Foster.
Indiana: There will ,be no Indiana
Union Revue this year. The event
was called off at a recent meeting of
the union board because of the dis-
concerting influences caused by the
war.
Colorado: Compulsory military
training for the students in the engin-
eering school of the University of Col-
orado will go into effect next fall, ac-
cording to a decision of the faculty of
that school. The intent is to establish
a regular officers' reserve corps at the
university.

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Fashioneecils
for Today
Specially purchased groups just in from New York-clear-
aways and sample lines that our buyers found last week during
a tour of the important markets. Good styles and materials
at prices customers will instantly recognize as unusual.

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AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Garrick-George Bernard Shaw's
comedy, "Getting Married."
Majestic - Sarah Bernhardt in
"Mothers of France."

Arcade-Joan Sawyer in"Love's
Law." -
Orpheum-Mae Murray in "On
Record," and Paramount com-
edy.
Rae- Mable Talliaferro in "A
Wife by Proxy," and Purple
Mask, No. 12.

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AT THE MAJESTIC

That the increasing number of Ger-
man babies was one of the chief causes
for the European war, is the belief of
Prof. E. R. Turner of the history de-
partment, as expressed in a lecture be-
fore one of his classes.
"Germany found her population in-
creasing at a rapid rate with no pos-
sible chance for expansion, and no
means within her borders of satisfy-
ing the rapidly growing number of
nouths to feed. From her standpoint
w'ar was almost biologically justified.
As one historian has expressed it,
'she had to go to the kitchens of her
neighbors to get it." '
"As far as colonization is concerned,
her lack of colonies to which to send
her surplus population is the result
of lack of foresight on the part of her
statesmen. Bismarck condemned col-
mization and it was not until 1880
hat her leaders saw the mistake, by
hat time all the desirable portions
of the world that were free to colonize
were taken. Her only chance lay in
South America and Turkey. We
blocked the way in South America
and Russia and England in Turkey.
She had to fight if she wanted what
her leaders called a 'place in the
inn."' .:=
3olumbia Balloon Corps Start Work
New York City, April 25.-Following
he arrival of the first captive balloon
for the Columbia balloon corps, active
raining has been started at the arm-
ory at Fourteenth street and Sixth
avenue.
A maximum of 40 men can be used
n the corps, most of the number hav-
ng already volunteered. The service
s the first of the kind in the United
Mtates. The men are trained in sign-
ling of all kinds, methods of observa-
;ion, and air navigation.
Prof. L. Waterman to Talk on Religion
"Religion in Its International As-
Dects" will be the subject on which
Prof. Leroy Waterman of the Semitics.
[epartment will address the class in
nternational relations at 7 o'clock to-
ight in room 302 University hall.
Plans are to be discussed concerning
he "wienie roast" which will be held
aturday afternoon up the river.
Have those rooms redecorated for
our May Festival guests. Phone 237.
H U. Major & Co.-Adv.
America's finest watches are Hamil-
ons. J. L. Chapman, Jeweler, agent.
13 So. Main St.-Adv. tue-eod;
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad-
ertising use The Michigan Daily. <

KILLED BILL MEANS STOP
OF TUBERCULOSIS SURVEY
Work to Be Continued as,-Long as
Money Holds
Out
As a result of the bill carrying an
appropriation for $50,000 to be used
in continuing the state tuberculosis
survey being killed by the ways and
means committee of the state legis-
lature, the work which was planned
for 14 counties of the state will have
to be abandoned, according to Miss
Carol F. Walton, secretary of the
Michigan Anti-tuberculosis society.
The work of conducting surveys in
the different counties will continue as
long as the funds hold out, but it will
be impossible to reach the counties
which were scheduled for surveys this
summer and most of which are in the
northern part of the lower peninsula.
The failure of the bill came as a
heavy blow to the Anti-tuberculosis
societ), and will result in much of the
work which has already been done
under the appropriations of the last
two years going for naught. It will
also be a blow to Michigan's prestige
which she has enjoyed for the past two
years, as one of the forerunners of
health legislation.
PRESIDENT TAPPAN'S GRANDSON
DIES WHILE AT PRINCETON
Word has just reached Ann Arbor
concerning the death of Rudolph E.
Brunnow, professor of Semitics at
Princeton university. Professor Brun-
now was a grandson of Henry Tap-
pan, first president of the University,
and was born in Ann Arbor in 1858.
His death was due to pneumonia.
Professor Brunnow was given an
honorary degree by the University on
the occasion of the unveiling of the
Tappan tablet in Alumni Memorial hall
in 1914.
Lecture on "Late Migrants" Tonight
Dr. M. M. Peet of the Medical school,
will talk to the Ann Arbor Bird club
at 7:30 o'clock tonight in room 355
Natural Science building on "Late Mi-
grants." The talk, which is the first
of a series on the late migrants, will
be illustrated with lantern slides.
Illinois Calls Off Spring Contests
Champaign, Ill., April 25.-Spring
athletic contests have been called off
by the athletic board of the Univer-
sity of Illinois. Training and farming
are the reasons.

Madame Sarah Bernhardt in "Moth-
ers of France," which will be at the
Majestic for three days, has given to
the public an example of her work
at its supreme point. It would be
hard to conceive of a picture produced
under more intense circumstances
than this which lays the heart of
France bare to the world. It con-
tains a message from the mothers of
France to the mothers of America.
Dartmouth Men Respond to Colors
Hanover, N. H., April 25.- Dart-
mouth's students responded 1,095
strong to the first call for volunteers
for the new Dartmouh regiment. Drill
is being given daily. Rifles and other
equipment have already been shipped,
and orders for uniforms are being
placed as fast as the measurements
can be taken. A home guard has been
formed by 125 faculty men and towns-
people.
Iowa Gets Big Sum for Improvements
Iowa City, Iowa, April 25. - New
buildings, repaired and refurnished
old buildings, and all other conveni-
ences can now be had by the Univer-
sity of Iowa. The legislature has ap-
propriated $2,535,000 for use of the
university for the two years from July
1, 1917, to June 30, 1919.
Like Farm Life Better Than Trenches
Champaign, Ill., April 25.- Illinois
students favor farm work to military
service by a proportion of 100 to one.
One hundred petitioned in one day to
leave to take up farm work, while
one signified his intention of joining
the aero corps.

Major C. W. Castle will address the
sophomore engineers at their assem-
bly this morning at 10 o'clock. For
all those who are back in class dues
provision will be made after the class
meeting to pay up, and during the re-
mainder of the day a table will be
placed at the main corridor of the
Engineering building.
Junior engineers will hold assem-
bly in room 348 of the Engineering
building at 8 o'clock this morning.
Prof. R. M. Wenley will talk.
REV. T. F. GAULD TO LECTURE
AT CHURCH SUPPER TONIGHT
"Religion and the World Crisis" is
the subject of the lecture the Rev.
T. F. Gauld of Toledo will deliver fol-
lowing the Unitarian church supper
tonight.
Daniel F. Zimmerman, '02L, will
,present a flag to the church, which
will be received by Mr. J. W. Langley,
who left the city in 1861 to serve as
a naval surgeon in the Civil war. Mr.
Zimmerman plans to go to the Fort
Sheridan officers' training camp
May 8.
Students of Unitarian families who
are enlisted in the naval reserves will
be special guests. After the supper
a dance will be held for members of
the church and their guests.
10,000 VILLISTAS GRAPPLE
MURGUIA'S CARRANZA FORCES
El Paso, Texas, April 25.-An en-
gagement between 10,000 Villistas and
General Murguia's Carranza forces is
reported in progress at Montezuma,
Gallego, and Carmen, according to an-
nouncement received here this after-
noon by Soriano Bravo, Mexican con-
sul.
The report said the Villista leaders,
Manuel Ochos and Francisco Beltran,
have been killed. The Villistas have
gained control of the railroad line
both north and aguth of Montezuma,
preventing movement of Murguia's
trains.

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$25.00 SILK DRESSES AT $19.75

Taffetas, silk pongees and combinations of taffeta and Geor-
gette crepe, charmingly designed in sport and dress effects, in-
cluding the straight, loose models and Rusian coat dress styles.
The colors are white, navy, old blue, rose, gray and orchid.

$6.50 AND $7.50 GEORGETTE WAISTS AT $5.00

. A lovely collection featuring all the newest frilled effects,
the fashionably large collars and flaring cuffs. Some are tucked
or shirred with touches of hand embroidery, but otherwise plain.
We could not have chosen a more timely period of the season to
announce them.
Cral, Nile, gold gray white, peach and chartreuse.

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RAINCOATS AT $5
A rackful of rubber lined, rainproof rain-
coats in all sizes-gray, navy and black and
white checks with black velvet collars.. All
sizes.
Regular $6.50 values.

Irfl
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$25.00 AND $30.00 SUITS AT $19.75

Patronize Daily Advertisers.

4/

6n 2 .

Refreshment when you're thirsty-A
brimming glass of pure deliciousness
when you want a palate-pleasing drink
-Exactly what you're looking for any
time.

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Serges, poplins., Poiret twills, gabardines and wool velours
in all-the favorite colors of the season, but principally black and
navy.
Smart tailored and fancy models trimmed in various ways:
With white broadcloth or silk poplin over-collars, patch pockets,
rows of bone buttons, gathered or box pleated backs, Paisley and
figured linings, and other distinctive features.
A great variety, all shown separately on a rack.

$25.00 FASHIONABLE COATS AT $18.75

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Mustard colored velours, delicately stitched in silk; wear
proof; Poiret twills and cut velours in conservative and unusual
colorings.
Handsome full length coats with broadcloth over-collars,
ornamental stitching, peg pockets and belts.
An extraordinary showing.
All sizes.

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(SECOND FLOOR)

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