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April 26, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-26

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RI" £ Y. AXV l . i* -
PROBABLY FAIR
TODAY

Crll

:4I1aitt;

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
-WIRE SERV'ICE

VOL. XXVI. No. 143. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 26, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT

COMMISSION FROM
FRANCE MET WITH
LONG LIVE IOFF RE'

Rival Nagazines
United at Last

Fate

and Printer Control April Num-
ber of Gargoyle and
Inlander

OVATION MARKS ARRIVAL OFI
REPRESENTATIVES ON t
MAYFLOWERx
$200,000,000 GIVEN
TO GREAT BRITAIN'
McAdoo Hands Treasury Warrant forc
Big Sm to Ambassador E
Cecil Springricet
By Robert J. Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)t
Washington, April 25.-Washingtont
became the capital of the world warc
today with the arrival of the French
commission headed by former Premier'
Viviani and Marshal Joffre, shortly be-1
fore 12:30 o'clock this afternoon.,
The big outstanding question is:
Will America send an army .to theI
battle front at once?
The French desire it. The British£
are non-committal, but intimate that
the United States can do more for the
allies Just now with money and food.
The Washington administratlit In-
cline to the implied British view. .
Arrival Impressive
Few more impressive scenes have
been witnessed in Washington than
that enacted at the navy yard where
the Mayflower arrived with the French
representatives. Secretary Lansing
personally greeted the party. As they
left the pier the marine band played
the French national air. Crowds lin-
ing the streets cheered the commis-
sioners as they were whisked away
in limousines.
The French embassy, headed by Am-
bassador Jusserand, greeted their
compatriots. The reception tendered
the commissioners amounted to an
ovation. Thousands lined the streets
from the navy yard to the French
quarters in the 16th street district.
"Vive la France"
Now and then out of the crowd a
great banner would greet the eyes,
reading "Vive la France," and "Long
Live Joffre." No flag was flying from
the Russian embassy, raising some
comment.
Secretary of Treasury McAdoo to-
day handed to British Ambassador
Cecil Springrice a treasury warrant for-
$200,000,000, Great Britain's first par-
ticipation in the $7,000,000,000 war
finance fund. Sir Cecil, on behalf of
the king, gave Secretary McAdoo his
personal receipt for the sum.
Financial Aid for Allies
Secretary McAdoo went into con-
ference late today with Balfour and
Sir Richard Crawford over the main
British war loan, probably between
$1,000,000,000 and $2,000,000,000, which
is to follow the preliminary $200,000,-
000 loan affected today.
The formal transfer of these two
important sets of papers, marking the
first financial aidof the United States
to her allies, took place in Secre-
tary McAdoo's private office. Gath-
ered about McAdoo's desk were Lord
Cunliffe, governor of the bank of Eng-
land; Sir Hartman Lever of the Brit-
ish commission; Sir Richard Crawford
attache of the British embassy, and
Ambassador Springrice.
Italy to Send Two Commissions
Rome, April 25.-Italy will send two
official commissions to the United
States. Announcement of the dispatch
of envoys to arrange financial mat-
ters between the two nations was
made today. Its membership was
withheld. At the same time it was
stated that the king probably will an-
nounce the selection of a notable mem-
bership for a commission to go to
Washington equal in rank to the
French and British representatives.

Fate and the printer have so willed
The April numbers of both the In-
lander and the Gargoyle will make
their appearance on the campus at
noon tomorrow. Hitherto an effort
has been made by the publications to
appear on different dates, but tomor-
row both the frivolous and the literary
minded will be served simultaneously.
The Inlander will contain a wealth
of material especially timely in the
shape of two articles by members of
the faculty. Mr. Lyman L. Bryson has
contributed a short essay on the rea-
sons favoring compulsory military
training, while Jonathan F. Scott of
the history department analyzes the
diplomatic situation previous to the
declaration of war. "The Wishes
That Came True," by T. F. McAllister,
'18, is a charming bit of prose, while
Kelsey Guilfoil, '19, is the author of
a humorous "communication." The
number is particularly rich in poetry,
contributed by Marian Wilson, '18,
Rowena B. Bastin, '18, Lester Water-
bury, '17, Carolyn E. Johnston, '20,
and S. Hincks.
The current issue of the Gargoyle
is dedicated to the campus "Tea
Hound," and contains a number of
clever drawings and shafts of wit di-
rected at teas. A double page draw-
ing by Roger Davis, '20, depicts the
change in University life since the
year 1897. An attractive cover by
Reed Bachman, '20, is worthy of note.
MiachinesChase
Hostile Planes
British Drive Off Enemy Destroyers
in Battle Outside Zee-
brugge
London, April 25.-A British admi-
ralty statement reports an attack by
three British naval machines on five
enemy destroyers, which were seen at
4:10/p'clock Monday steaming between
Blankenberghe and Zeebrugge in a
northeasterly direction five miles off
the coast.
"The leading machine," says the
statement, "attacked, dropping sixteen
bombs, one of which was seen to ob-
tain a direct hit.
"The four destroyers closed in on
the disabled craft. Ahostile seaplane
attacked our machines, but was easily
driven off. At 6:40 o'clock the four
destroyers werereported by a recon-
naissance machine as entering Zee-
brugge harbor. It is considered most
probable that one destroyer wab
sunk."
GOVERNMENT BUILDING NEW
TRAINING CAMP IS REPORT
Word has been received from Cap-
tain Moffat, commandant of the Great
Lakes naval training station, that the
government now has under construc-
tion a semi-permanent training camp
at Lake Bluff, Ill.
This camp has already received 4,-
000 naval reserves but they are still
coming in at the rate of 500 per day.
The 7th and 8th divisions of the Mich-
igan naval reserves will be taken in
just as soon as proper accommoda-
tions can be made, this probably being
at the end of the week.
Submarines Take Men from Ohio State
Columbus, 0., April 25.-The cal:
of the submarine has taken severa
men from Ohio State university. They
have enlisted for service with the mos
quito fleets chasing down submarine
in the Atlantic.
Quarantined With German Measle
Thurman L. McCormick, '17, 105
South Thayer street, and Garth W
Boericke, '18, 523 Packard street, ar

quarantined in their rooms with Ger
man measles.

W .BI CAMPAIGN'
STILL SPINNING
Decide to Extend Time of Canvass
Until 9 O'clock To-
night
WORKERS RAISE FUND TO
ONE-HALF -OF TOTAL NEEDED
Y. W. C. A. Members Subscribe $950
of Sum; Edwin Cunliffe's Team
in Lead
Despite the efforts of the many
workers in the "Y" campaign, reports
show that but one-fourth of the cam-
pus has been canvassed, and for this
reason the campaign has been ex-
tended until 9 o'clock this evening.
The War, Expense, and Busrah fund
had reached a total of $3,500 it was
announced last night, or one-half the
amount needed. Nine hundred and
fifty dollars of this was secured
through members of the Y. W. C. A.
The team captained by Edwin Cun-
liffe, '19, led in the amount of sub-
scriptions gained, with that headed
by N. D. Ireland, '18, second, and the
squad under H. E. Johnson, '17, run-
ning third.
Fraternities have responded gen-
erously to the call, and arrangements
have been made to receive reports
from them during the- remainder of
the week.-
Members of all the teams together
with their captains are asked to be
present at Lane hall tonight, between
9 and 9:30 o'clock.
U-BOAT VICTIM OF
U.S. SHOT-REPORT
Navy Department Refuses to Discuss
News That Freighter Mon-
gola Sank Sub
Washington, April 25.-The navy de-
partment received a report this aft-
ernoon through official channels say-
ing, in effect, that officers of the Am-
erican liner Mongolia thought, in an
encounter with a submarine they had
sunk the U-boat. The supposed sink-
ing occurred while the Mongolia was
bound from the United States for Eng-
land.
In view of the fact, however, that
the navy's information was not posi-
tive, the message itself was withheld.
Officials said they did not care to
spread a story without having the act-
ual facts. The state department re-
fused to discuss whether it had had
such a report.
The Mongolia is a steel screw steam-
er of 13,238 tons, formerly owned by
the Pacific Mail Steamship company,
and is one of the biggest American
freighters. She sailed from an Amer-
ican port on April 7, carrying a big
cargo of war supplies, including am-
munition.
Y. M. C. A. NOMINATES OFFICERS
FOR THE YEAR OF 19171918
Nominations of Y. M. C. A. officers
for the year 1917-18 were made by
- the "Y" cabinet at its meeting Tues-
day night. Cards containing the names
of the nominees will be sent out tc
- all members today. The voting will
take place Saturday, the location of
- the ballot boxes will be announced
later.
The following men were nominated
President, Merle B. Doty, '18E; Nea
D. Ireland, '18L, E. 0. Snethen, '18L

1 vice-president, E. R. Baxter, '18, N
I C. Bender, '19M, E. K. Cunliffe, '19;
secretary-treasurer, J. E. Robinson
- '19, W. H. Dorrance, '19E,. H. H. Cha-
s man, '18.
Canadian Club to Smoke Tonight
S Following the business meeting
which is to be held at 7 o'clock thi
. evening at the Michigan Union, the
e Canadian club will give a smoker
- Members and their friends are invite
to attend.

Good Tickets Nay Appear in
Great Britain if Crops Fail

London, April 25.-Lord Devonport,
England's food comptroller, indicated
today that there may be a British com-
pulsory food rationing, although he
hopes to avoid it, since such a move
would be un-English. Lord Devon-
port said:
"We must be prepared for all con-
tingencies. There is always a possi-
bility of failure of the present year's
crops, and an increase in submarin-
CEROLE FRANCAIS GIVE
LES PAT'TES DE MOUCHE
L. S. THOMPSON, '18, AND MAR-
GARET KERR, '18, HAVE
LEAD ROLES

ing. 'No margin for risk has been de-
cided, but we can set up the ma-
chinery for rationing bread, sugar, or
any other food produce on short
notice when the time comes, and when
it becomes necessary.
"Meantime the nation must decide
whether the rationing of itself should
be a matter of voluntary co-operation,
thus avoiding the idea of compulsion,
food tickets, food officers, and such
things of un-English character.'

ADVICE COMES AS REPLY
LETTER OF PRESIDENT
HUTCHINS

TO

STUDENTS SHOULD
NOT ENLIST SAYS
GENERAL LIAN1WOOD

NEED COLLEGE MEN
IN OFFICER'S RANK

With a cast of experienced campus
actors, with special entertainment be-
tween acts, and with the demand for
seats fulfilling all expectations, the
eleventh annual production . of the
Cercle Francais, Victorien Sardon's
"Les Pattes de Mouche," has all the
prospects of being a complete success
when it is presented by the Cercle at
8 o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
Leland S. Thompson, '18, as Prosper
Block, and Margaret Kerr, '18, as Su-
zanne, have the leading roles. The
time between the acts will be en-
livened by special entertainment in
the form of French songs. The cast
is as follows:
Leland Thompson, '18, Prosper
Block; Margaret Kerr, '18, Suzanne;
Jacob Braude, '18, Vanhove; Mrs. A.
C. Weaver, grad., Clarisse; George
Wilner, '17, Thirion; Dorothy Gruss,
'19, Colomba; Gilbert Byrne, '19,
Busonier; Marion H. Sharpe, '19,
Marthe; L. F. Kuijala, '19, Paul; Anna
von Walthausen, '18, Solange; H. F.
Fenstemaker, '18, Baptiste; Doris E.
Prter, '18, Claudine; Earl F. Gasar
'18, Henri; Lillian 'Carnegie, '17, a
servant; Harold H. Britton, '19, and
William Dawson, '20, hunters.
Play Filled with Humor
"Victorien Sardou," said Dean John
R. Effinger, "has filled 'Les Pattes de
Mouche' with an abundance of humor.
There is no moral to the play nor is
there any deep philosophy to be de-
rived from it. 'Les Pattes de Mouche'
has achieved its place as one of the
greatest works of the French pl9y-
wright because of its masterful plot,
its humorous situations, and because
of its entertaining qualities."
Because a scrap of paper, a love
letter, does not reach its destination,
two lovers are separated and a series
of complications results, in which a
conflict of wits between Prosper and
Suzanne predominate.
Lovers Separated
Prosper and Clarisse are the lovers
who have been separated because of
a misunderstanding due to the failure
of Prosper to receive a letter from
Clarisse. Clarisse is taken to Paris
by her mother and is there married
to Vanhove.
Later the former lovers meet again
and the question of the letter comes
up. Clarisse tells Prosper that she
[ placed the letter in the statue, which
they used in their common corre-
spondence, and was surprised to learn
that he had not found it. Both try to
recover it, but are prevented by the
appearance of the jealous husband,
Vanhove.
Gets Paper
When, at last, Prosper gains pos-
session of the scrap of paper, the
clever Suzanne enters upon the scene
and vows to obtain the paper for
Clarisse. There follows a duel of wits
3 between Prosper and Suzanne, during
v which some comical situations fur-
nish additional interest, rising to a
d climax when Vanhove finally learns
(Continued on Page Six)

CLARK UPHOLDS DRIVE
AGINST CONSCRIPTION
HEED, IN SENATE, ALSO SPEAKS
AGAINST PLAN FOR RAIS-
ING ARMY
By J. P. Yoder
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 25.-The crest of
the wave of opposition to the govern-
ment's selective conscription plan for
raising the nation's army was reached
in congress today when Speaker
Champ Clark denounced the plan.
"Volunteering," declared Clark, "is
the only way in which a republic
should raise its armies."
Clark, who has opposed Wilson but
twice on issues, solemnly declared he
would "follow the president when he
believed the president right.
"Further than that," said the speak-
er deliberately, "I will not go, so help
me God!"
The galleries, filled mostly with
women, continuously applauded. In
the meantime a like high-watei' mark
was reached in the senate, where Reed
of Missouri made the speech of the
day against the president's plan. Reed
said:
"I believe the reason some people
oppose the volunteer plan is for fear
t , a (eudaire Roosevelt will get a
commission. I never voted for him,
seldom agreed with him,. and could
not subscribe to his policies, but Theo-
dore Roosevelt is a valiant and brave
American, and if he is willing to or-
ganize a body of men to defend our
country, then God give his arm
strength to do so, and his soul ad-
ditional valor."
Senator Meyers, conscription advo-
cate, said he was in hearty accord
with all Reed had said, and favored
giving Roosevelt a commission.
"Yes, but you want to draft him,"
retorted Reed. The speaker intro-
duced a sheaf of telegrams from na-
tional guard adjutant generals of va-
rious states, asserting the guard could
not be recruited to war strength at
once, as ordered by the war depart-
ment. He declared that the war de-
partment is "deliberately attempting
to throttle enlistment in the militia."
Speaks on Delinquent Girl Problem
.Dr. Rhoda V. DeBois will speak to
the Women's Research club on "The
Problem of the D inquent Girl," at 8,
o'clock Saturday ni ht in the auditor-
ium of the Natural Science building.
This will be an open meeting and all
the women of the University are in-
vited to attend.

Advocates Entrance Into Reserve Of
ficers' Training Camps or
Drill on Campus
University students should not en-
list!
This advice comes from no less a
person than Major-General Leonard A.
Wood, U. S. A., recognized as one of
America's foremost military author-
ities today.
General Wood's advice comes as a
reply to a letter sent him by Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins, asking his
advice regarding what Michigan men
should do in the present crisis. .The
president pointed out that many men
are desirous of serving their country
in time of war, but at the same time
want to finish their scholastic work.
General Wood Replies
General Wood's reply to the presi-
dent follows:
"Yours of the eighteenth received
and appreciated. I should advise the
student body not to enlist -until the
plans of the government are definitely
known. Those who are qualified should
go to the training camps for reserve
officers. These camps open May 8.
Enlistment now means enlistment in
the militia or the regular army. Col-
lege men should make every effort to
qualify to serve as officers. No man
can go to the training camps who is
not over 20 years and nine months of
age. The best thing to do at the pres-
ent is to go on with the college work,
especially where the university has "a
military instructor as yours has."
From his reply to the president, it
is evident that the general believes
that all men should serve their coun-
try, but should not rush to the colors
without adequate training. For this
reason he advocates their entrance
into the reserve officers' training
camps, or work in the University un-
der Major Charles W. Castle.
'Welcome Information
Coupled with Adjutant-General Mc-
Can's telegram, received Tuesday,
stating that the reserve officers' train-
ing camps will be continued indefi-
nitely until sufficient officers are
trained, this message from General
Wood comes as welcome information
to those students who wish to finish
their school year. With Major Castle
now supervising the military prepara-
tions of the University, it is possible
for the student to prepare himself for
service to his country and still con-
tinue with scholastic duties.
Iowa Faculty Men Hold First Drill
Iowa City, Iowa, April 25.-Forty-
four faculty men responded for the
first drill of the faculty training com-
pany here today. Twenty who had sig-

20 Ships Run U-boat Gauntlet Safely
New York, April 25.-Twenty ves-
sels arrived in an American port today
in proof of the ineffectiveness of the
submarine blockade. Most of them
sailed through the U-boat zone. They
included an armed American steamer
and four big freighters, aggregating
60,000 tons.
Movie to Benefit Women's Club
Tickets for Lionel Barrymore in
"His Father's Son" at the Arcade
theater Friday are on sale for the
benefit of the Ann Arbor Women's
club.

nified an intention of drilling were un-
able to be present. Many more are
expected to sign up now that the or-
ganization is under way. Notable ad-
ditions to the list yesterday were How-
ard Jones, football coach, and M. A.
Kent, baseball coach.
Cable Censorship Discussed by Daniels
Washington, April 25.-Plans to es=
tablish a censorship over all cable,
telegraph, and telephone lines in the
country were discussed today at a
conference between Secretary Daniels
and representatives of leading cable
companies.

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THE CERCLE FRANCAIS
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Pattes de Mi
SEATS ON SALE AT WAHR'S

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