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April 25, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-25

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED - COOL
EAST WINDS

r1Sir itan

144hr
4:11att

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 142. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE1N

DRAT OPPONENTS
DISCUSS SYSTEM
IN HOUSE DEBATES
SPEAKER CLARK ANNOUNCES
HIMSELF AS AGAINST CON-
SCRIPTION
ARGUE TRIAL FIRST
OF VOLUNTEER PL AN
%Representative Anthony Says Munition
Makers Want to Force Selec-
tive Draft in Army
By J. P. Yoder
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 24.- Opponents
of conscription in any form held sway
during today's debate in both houses
on the administration's army measure.
Speaker Clark announced himself as
entirely opposed to conscription.
In the senate Thomas, Democrat of
Colorado, arguing for trial first of a
voluntary system, said that if con-
scriptionists were sincere they would
advocate not only emulation of Eng-
land's example in this respect, but
also would demand emulation of Eng-
land's example in government control
of railroads, and waterway transporta-
tion systems.
Read Roosevelt's Offer
Thomas read Roosevelt's offer to
raise and lbad a volunteer division
to the trenches. He termed Roose-
velt's offer as a great, worthy, and a
patriotic offer. "Such offers as this
should be heeded before we turn to
consription," said Thomas. Thomas
attacked vigorously the selective ele-
ment of the bill as creating a class
of slackers and he assailed exemption
clauses as unfair on the ground of
their unequality.
La Follette Proposes Exemption Plan
Senator LaFollette proposed that
college students and students in train-
ing for any line of work, and persons
engaged in work contributing to the
national interests should be exempt-
ed. LaFollette proposed to establish
local tribunals in each congressional
district composed of men appouited by
the president to hear exemption pleas.
They would be authorized to grant
certificates of exemption.
Charges Munition Makers
In the house, Representative An-
thony of Kansas, charged that muni-
tion makers are behind the propagan-
da to force selective draft in the army.
He said he would not be .surprised to
learn that members of the American
defense society of New York, who sent
telegrams to his district urging con-
scription were stockholders in muni-
tion plants. He did not explain his
reason.
"Passage of a straight conscription
bill will rob the homes of the country
of youths undeveloped physically and
mentally, many of them with no spirit
to fight," Representative Fields of the
military committee declared.
U. S. STEEL CORPORATION
DECLARES LARGE DIVIDEND
New York, April 24.- The United
States Steel corporation today declar-
ed the greatest dividend in its history
for the quarter ended March 31. The
total dividend on common stock was
$22,502,856, an increase of $15,249,075.
An extra dividend of three per cent
was declared, representing a melon of
$15,249,075.
Following the announcement of the
vast earnings of the corporation, which
amounted to $113,121,081, Judge Al-
bert R. Gary announced that the cor-
poration would subscribe to $5,000,000
of the government's three and one-
half per cent war loan.
TO FINISH RED CROSS
PROGRAM THURSDAY
Grand March to Form at Nine o'Clock
Friday Night; Naval Reserves
May Give Drill

No exact program of the Red Cross
ball Friday evening, April 27, in Bar-
bour and Waterman gymnasiums will
be given out until tomorrow, but it is
expected that the grand march will
form at 9 o'clock.
In the course of the evening, some
of the University women who have
been training under Miss Alice Evans,
head of the physical education depart-
ment for women, will dance a minuet,
"Green Sleeves," dressed in colonial
costume. Later in the evening an ex-
hibition dance, "The Sailors' Horn-
pipe," will be presented.
It is-the hope of the committee that
the naval reserve will give an exhib-
ition drill, but the preparations and
expectation of several corps to leave
Ann Arbor are taking so much time
that it may not be able to prepare
the drill.
No programs will be supplied for
dancing, and the men and women may
go without partners, meeting at the
gymnasium. Tickets for the ball may
be obtained at any of the banks of
the city, or of members of the commit-

Selects Personnel
for Commission

ENLISTMENT CALLS
213 'FOR SERVICE

Wilson Chooses Men to S4
American Council to
Russia

erve on I

Students Join Various

SPIDER CONTINUIS
TO COMPLETE WEB
Network of Ambitious Workers Spread
Over City, Reaching Students
and Citizens
COMMITTEES RAISE $2,000 OF
$7,000 IN SHORT CAMPAIGN

PARTY ARRIVES

FRENCH

WAR

CONTINUE CAMPS
I ND FI N ITELY TO

Washington,

April 24. -

Units of Army

Washington, April 24.-The person-
nel of the American commission to
Russia has been decided upon by
President Wilson, it was announced
today. Its dispatch to Russia now
awaits only a conference with the
British and French, war commissions
as to the scope of work which had best
be undertaken and the class of experts
that should be sent with the commis-
sion.
It is understood that Elihu Root,
Charles R. Crane, Professor Harper of
Chicago university, and Theodore
Roosevelt will be asked to serve on
the commission, although confirmation
was lacking today.
ARMY OFFICERS ORDERED
TO EXAMEAPPLICANTS
MAJOR CASTLE INFORMS STU-
DENTS OF WAR TO ENTER
CAMPS
Regular arm officers of the line or
the engineering corps, wherever sta-
tioned, have lien authorized by the
war department to act as an examiner
of applicants to the officers' reserve
training canmps, according to the state-
ment of Major C. W. Castle at the in-
formation bureau in Alumni Memorial
hall yesterday afternoon.-r
The candidate for admission shall
first send his application, accompanied
by three letters of recommendation
and a statement of his preliminary
physical examination, to the Command-
ing General, Central department, Fed-
eral building, Chicago. If these are
satisfactory the applicant shall be no-
tified to appear for the final physical
examination. This test will be made
by an examining board in charge of
Major Castle.
More than 50 application blanks
were received by the information bur-
eau yesterday, but this number was
not sufficient to supply the demand.
Preliminary examinations are being
made by Dr. James H. Beakey, free
of charge. The hour is from 4 to 5
o'clock daily and candidates applying
before this hour will not be examined.
DESCRIBES WRITING
W K. Towers, '10-'12L, Talks on Fields
Open to Journalists
"Many men know how to write
things, but do not know the market
to sell them in," stated Walter K.
Towers, '10-'12L, in a lecture yester-
day to students of journalism in which
he\outlined the possibilities open in
the journalistic field to young writers.
"The main thing in writing is to
write about some subject which you
know. Then the next thing is to study
the field. Many men get a comfortable
income'by selling 'pot-boilers' to mag-
azines and papers. When you hear of
a good joke told by a prominent man
jot it down. It will be good selling
material to almost any magazine."
Mr. Towers described the difficul-
ty of magazine editors to seure
writers who could write fact articles.
He stated that the modern magazine
was devoting more space to articles on
business matters and that there was
an almost unlimited field open to the
man who could write stories in an in-
teresting way.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF
STATE SOCIETY TO MEET
There are a number of important
matters to come up before the state
executive committee of the Michigan
Anti-tuberculosis society which meets
at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon in room
435 Natural Science building.
The committee is now composed of
Dr. Herman Ostrander, Kalamazoo,
chairman; Dr. Collins H. Johnston,
Grand Rapids; Dr. Victor C. Vaughan,
Ann Arbor; Mrs. Elnora Chamberlin,
Hartford ; Mrs. L. E. Gretter, Detroit;
Mrs. Burr B.sLincoln, Harbor Beach;
Mrs Frances Wheeler Smith, Hastings;
Dr. J. H. Kellogg, Battle Creek; Dr.
William DeKleine, Lansing; Dr. Ar-
thur F. Fischer, Hancock, and Miss
Carol F. Walton, Ann Arbor.

Sophomore Lit Class to Drill Today
All soph lits out at 4 o'clock for drill
in front of Waterman gym.

and Navy Departments
of Country
NAVAL RESERVES HEAD LIST
WITH 160 MEN SIGNED UP
Eight Senior Medics to Leave May 1
for Training School at
Washington
Michigan's roll of honor contains
213 names.
Of this number 160 have enlisted in
the Michigan naval militia, 11 senior
medics and homoeops have enlisted in
medical corps of the navy, 16 have
joined some branch of the navy, eight
have joined the coast guard, four have
joined the cavalry, three the national
guard, five the signal corps, three of
these being in the aviation reserve
signal corps, one in the hospital corps,
one at Culver training camp, one in
the artillery, one will take up aero-
nautic service in the navy, and five
have not reported what branch they
will join.
This list is not complete, for some
men who have enlisted have not yet
applied to the dean of their college
for honorable discharge.
The following men are from the lit-
erary college:
Literary College
Paul Booth, '20, coast defense re-
serve corps; Warren Burchell, '19,
Grand Rapids naval militia; M. S.
Charlton, '20; Hugh Cook, '19, Grand
Rapids naval militia; Marshall Craw-
ford, '20, engineering corps Kansas
national guard; G. J. Diekema, '20,
Culver training camp; E. T. Edwards,
'20, Pacific coast marine corps; Wil-
lard Foster, '20, United States coast
patrol, Newport, R. I.; Norton L. Gold-
smith, '19, aviation section of reserve
signal corps; Gerveys Grylls, '17, avia-
tion section of reserve signal corps;
S. B. Hartman, '19, coast guard patrol,
United States naval reserve force;
Charles Hixson, '20, United States cav-
alry; R. F. Houseman, '19, signal
corps; R. M. Kerr, '20, naval militia;
Kenneth McColl, '18, United States
naval reserve force; Robert Richard-
son, '20, marines; W. K. Robertson,
'17; W. E. Schmitt, '19, Ohio naval
militia; Hazen Schouman, '20, United
States cavalry; G. A. R. Schuster, '20,
Missouri national guard; F. M. Sut-
ter, '18, United States naval reserve
coast guard patrol; J. W. Townsend,
'20, hospital medical corps; Willis
Weaver Jr., '20, Buffalo, N. Y., naval
reserves; J. T. Woodford, '18, Chicago
naval militia; W. D. Craig, '19, First
division Michigan naval militia; Ken-
neth K. Koch, '20, on board U. S. S.
Massachusetts; Charles F. Lambert,
'19 United States naval reserve force;
William A. Moore, '20, Third regiment,
Indiana national guard; Paul M. Stim-
son, '20, coast patrol; L. L. Trumbull,
'20, United States cavalry; Hugh Mc-
Millan, '19, Great lake naval training
station, Lake Bluff, Ill.; R. W. Har-
bert, '17; J. P. Hart, '19; J. E. Hayes,
'19, United States cavalry; Paul E.
Jeremiah, '20, coast patrol, Newport
News, Va.; E. H. Loud, '18, aviation
branch of signal corps; R. A. Mc-
Ewan, signal corps; Lee K. Richard-
son, '17; C. A. Spiess, '20.
Engineering College
The following men are from the en-
gineering and architectural colleges:
C. H. Morse, '20E, Battery D, First
Illinois; J. W. Neumann, '17E,
Philadelphia navy yard; A. L. Nichols,
'18E, aeronautic service United
States navy; Gordon Smith, '17E, naval
coast reserve.
Eight seniors of the Medical school
have been admitted into the medical
corps of the navy, having passed suc-
cessfully the physical examination,
given by Dr. Edgar Thompson, exam-
ing officer for the navy, and also hav-
.ing maintained an average of 85 per
cent during the four years of their
scholastic work in the Medical school.
The men are as follows: Walter A.
Fort, Harold L. Kennedy, Bertil T. Lar-
son, Joseph S. Leszynki, Loren W.
Shaffer, Benjamin G. Holtom, Alfred
L. Arnold, and Jack W. Jones.
They have been ordered to report
at Washington on May 1 where they
will attend the Naval Medical school
for three months and then be assigned
to active duty.
Three senior homoeopaths, C. C.
Wolcott, C. B. Mandeville, and V. W.
Berstrom, have passed examinations

similar to those passed by the senior
medics and have been admitted to the
same branch of service.

N.

D. Ireland, '18, and Edwin Cunliffe,
'19, Captains, Report Largest

France's war commission to the
United States has landed safely
on American soil, the state de-
partment announced today. The
port of landing and other de-
tails were shrouded by the cen-
sorship.
It was learned, however, that
the commission will arrive in
Washington tomorrow morning
aboard the president's private
yacht, the Mayflower. Members
include ex-Premier Viviani, Gen-
eral Joffre, and Major Deyfus.

MICHIGAN STUDENTS NEED
ENROLL NOW TO SECURE
C11mISSIONS,

FIL

YACAgNCIE

MAJOR C. W.
REVIEWS

CASTLE
COMPAN

Amounts Pledged
With $2,000 already pledged toward
the $7,000 goal of the W. E. B. cam-
paign, the spider has completed the
second lap around his web which is
spreading all over the city.
N. D. Ireland, '18, and Edwin Cun-
liffe, '19, are the captains of the so-
liciting groups who reported the larg-
est amounts pledged yesterday.
The Paptains of the committees in
order of the amounts pledged so far
are: H. H. Chapman, '18, E. M. Bender,
'19, J. D. Menchopes, '18, H. E. John-
son, '17, G. B. Watkins, '19E, Cordon
Avery, '18E, A. C. Broyles, '19, James
Reeder, '18, J. E. Whitlow, '19, Ed-
ward Buckner, '19, and L. I. Birckel-
bow, '18E.
Rev. A. W. Stalker and William
Adams, '17, chairman of the campaign,
were the speakers at the "pep" sup-
per given the members of commit-
tees last evening, in Lane hall, while
the women were addressed by their
captains, Ethel Vail, '17, and Lillian
Carnegie, '17, in the Y. W. C. A.
AEROPLANES SINK
GERMAN DESTROYER

Form Separate Unit of Students
Are Training for Officers'
Reserve Corps

whc

Probably Largest Vessel Sunk
Aircraft During Present
War

by

London, April 24.-A German de-
stroyer is believed to have been sunk
in a fight with British aeroplanes off
Zeebrugge, the admiralty announced
tonight. Five enemy destroyers and
three aeroplanes were engaged in the
fight.
Th aeroplanes attacked the enemy
vessels upon finding them near the
coast. This is the first time an aero-
plane has been credited with sinking,
a vespel as large as a destroyer. Re-
ports of aviators having destroyed sub-j
marines have been received, but the
aeroplane-destroyers engagement is
probably the first of the war.
CHICAGO ALUMNI PETITION
FOR COMPULSORY TRAINING
Chicago, April 24.-Letters and peti-
tions for the consideration of com-
pulsory military training at Michigan
are being sent out to all University'
of Michigan alumni by the local as-a
sociation asking that their signatures
be attached, and the petitions be re-1
turned to President Harry B. Hutch-
ins. Great earnestness on the part of
Chicago alumni expressed itself in the
letters sent the University's gradu-
ates. The signed requests will be sub-t
mitted to the board of Regents.
TO SPEAK ON GREECE
Harvard Professor Lectures This Aft-
ernoon in Science Building
"Sic transit gloria mundi."-Thus
passes the glory of the world.
In effect, this statement is the key-
note of the lecture, "Greece, Past and
Present; Economic Contrasts," which
Prof. W. S. Ferguson of Harvard uni-
versity, will deliver at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in the Natural Science
auditorium. Professor Ferguson will
portray the contrast which exists be-
tween the Greece of ancient times and
the Greece of today.
The lecture is open to the public, no
admission being charged.
SEND OUT 100 SUBPOENAS
TO ATTEND CREASE DANCE
One hundred subpoenas will be sent
out today and tomorrow by the senior
laws summoning their guests to at-
tend the annual Crease dance which
will be held from 9 until 1 o'clock Fri-
day night at the Union.
The chairman of the social commit-
tee stated last night that everything
was now in readiness. Shook's orches-
tra will furnish the music and dec-
orations will be made by a local firm.

LITERARY STUDENTS GETI
REDIT FORFARM WORK
FACULTY TO CONSIDER ALL RE-
QUESTS; APPLICATION MUST
MERIT CONSIDERATION
Where literary students are needed
at home on the farm, requests for cred-
its will be considered by the literary
committee on military instruction and
service created by a resolution passed
by the literary faculty at its session
Monday night.
The purpose of the committee is to
consider without delay any requests
of literary students who desire to re-
turn to the farm. Any student so de-
siring must hand in a request in writ-
ing either with a statement from his
parents signifying that his help is
needed or must in some other way
show to the committee that the ap-
plicant's return to the farm will merit
granting his credits.
The faculty passed the following
general resolution: "Resolved, That
all requests for credits for work left
incomplete, not already provided for
by previous legislation, shall be re-
ferred with power to the committee
of the literary faculty on military in-
struction and service."
The following members compose the
committee: Dean John R. Effinger,
chairman; Prof. S. L. .Bigelow, and
Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, associate mem-
bers.
TREATS FRENCH PLAY
Dean John R. Effinger Delivers Last
Cercle Francais Lecture
Dean John R. Effinger delivered the
last of a series of lectures, given un-
der the auspices of the Cercle
Francais, yesterday afternoon at Tap-
pan hall. His subject was Victorien
Sardou's "Les Pattes de Mouche," the
play to be presented by the Cercle to-
morrow evening at Sarah Caswell
Angell hall.
"'Les Pattes de Mouche'" he said,
"means 'a scribbled note.' It was writ-
ten in 1861 and is considered one of
Sardou's greatest works. Sardou's
place is higher in the history of dra-
matic production than in the history
of literary production. He does not
attack great problems. He is rather
to be considered as an entertainer. He
had a marvelous gift of humor and is
a master in plot formation."
WOMEN'S CLUBS TO MEET TO
STUDY OPEN AIR SCHOOLS
In order to bring before the people
of Ann Arbor the benefits of open air
schools and to institute steps to estab-
lish them in this city the local
branches of the Collegiate alumnae
and Federation of Mothers' clubs will
hold an open meeting at 8 o'clock to-
night in the Church of Christ.
Mrs. H. W. Harvey, a member of
the Battle Creek school board, who
was largely instrumental in estab-
lishing the open air schools in that
city, will speak and two films of mo-
tion pictures will be shown to demon-
strate the practical workings of the
schoola tere. Two speakers con-
nected with the open air schools of
Toledo will tell of the experience of
that city and Miss Grace Erb, teacher
in the open air school at Ypsilanti,
will speak of the activities of her
school and bring examples of the
clothing worn by the children while
in the school.

Michigan men will not have to en-
ter the reserve officers' training camps
which begins May 8 in order to pre-
pare themselves for receiving com-
missions. This information reached
Ann Arbor yesterday in the form of a
telegram to President Harry B.
Hutchins from Adjutant-General Mc-
Can, U. S. A. President Hutchins
telegraphed to Secretary of War Bak-
er, April 19, as follows:
"Kindly have me advised whether
university students must enter officers'
training camps announced in today's
papers immediately in order to insure
acceptance in such camps. Will an-
other period in training be inaugurated
in such camps later in summer? Many
students wish to finish school here if
so doing would not endanger chance
of acceptance at officers' camps."
The reply received from Adjutant-
General NlcCan reads:
"Present intention is to continue
training camps one after another for
candidates oflicers' reserve corps until
all vacancies have been filled. This
means for an indefinite period."
To Continue Camps
It might be inferred from the reply
that if a sufficient number of men ap-
ply for admission into the training
camps which begins May 8, no further
camps will be held, but this is highly
improbable, according to Major Charles
W. Castle, who said:
"The fact that the government is
making preparations for a series of
these camps leads to the assumption
that they will not have sufficient ap-
plications for the first camp to war-
rant their discontinuance after the
first one is held. It is a matter for
the indiviSlual to decide for himself.
If the man thinks that he can afford
to discontinue his scholastic work at
present he should enter the first camp,
but if he desires to continue his work,
he will have opportunity to enter the
camps to be held later."
Major Reviews Companies
Major Castle met the engineering
corps drilling on Ferry field yester-
day. He also revie~ved the laws and a
company of literary students. He ex-
pressed himself as being pleased with
the progress they have made. "They
have evidently done considerable work
and have a good start,"- the major
said.
The present organization of drilling
will be continued, because Major Cas-
tle believes at this late date in the
scholastic year, there is notneed of
altering anddisorganizing the com-
panies already formed.
Separate Corps for Applicants
According to the present plans of
the major, those men who are making
application for the officers' reserve
corps will be formed into a separate
company, where they will receive ad-
vanced coaching and instruction to
prepare them 'for the work in the
camps.
The hours to be set aside for drill-
ing will have to be arranged by the
University authorities, since schedules
must be made that will not interfere
with the students' other work.
MEDICS MAY DROP
CONTINUOUS PLAN
Washington Official Advises Schools
to Abandon Speeding up
of Sessions
Urging all medical schools to abn-
don the plan of continuous sessions,
Franklin Martin, a member of the ad-
visory committee of the council of na-
tional defense, sent the following tele-
gram to Dean W. B. Hinsdale of the
Homoeopathic Medical school yester-
day: "The executive committee of
medical board council of national de-
fense after careful consideration urges
all medical schools to abandon the
speeding un plan of the continuous
session as being undesirable and un-
necessary. A meeting of the deans o
medical schools is called for Saturday
morning, April 28, at 11 o'clock i
Council of National Defense building
You are urged to attend. Report fol-
lows.
Honor Senior Medics Tomorrow Nigh
In honor of the 10 members of thE
senior medical class who will leav
Monday to enter the service of th
United States navy on May 1, a suppe
is to be served in Barbour gymnasiun

at 6 o'clock tomorrow evening.
The entire school is to unite in giv-
ing this supper which is to be served
by the women of the Collegiate
Alumnae a unit of the national league
for women's service.

g-

r
M

HELP THE SPIDER SPIN

Wo

E.

B.

A
7
Y

y

See the Spider at Lane Hall and the Busy Bee

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