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April 24, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND COOLER
TODAY

ian

fiattu

UNITED PRESS
D)AY ANDI? NIHT
WVIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVIL No. 141. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN

ONLY EQUPE AN
FIT ARMY WIL0G
Williams, Administration Leader, Says
Trench Troops Must First
Be Well Trained
HOUSE SESSION INDICATES
CLEAR MAJORITY FOR DRAFT
Weeks of Massachusetts Urges for
Conscription as Only Means to
Bring Results
By J. P. Yod'er
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 23.-"America
will send an army to the European
trenches if we ever get an army fit
and equipped." This was the declara-
tion of Senator Williams, administra-
tion leader in the senate, during the
debate this afternoon on the adminis-
tration's army conscription bill.
Senator Wadsworth was denouncing
the voluntary system as inadequate
and inefficient. Hiram Johnson, Cali-
fornia, was fencing in the interests of
an amendment by Harding of Ohio
which, if accepted, would permit Col-
onel Roosevelt to raise his division
and take it to France.
No Untrained Troops to Be Sent
"Is it the ultimate policy of our gov-
ernment to send an army abroad?"
asked Johnson. "The bill itself an-
swers that," Williams interrupted. "We
are going to send one if we ever get
one fit and equipped, but we do not
want to send boys. unfit, untrained,
and unequipped."
On the house side today Representa-
tive Lunn of New York attacked the
advocates of volunteering, charging
that by opposing draft they were no
less than enemies of the republic. The
applause of about two-thirds of the
members present indicated a clear
majority for the draft. The extension
of the draft to male citizens not
eligible to military conscription to
form a service army for food produc-
tion was defended by Representative
Emerson of Ohio in a resolution.
Favors Compulsory Service
Compulsory military service in a
democracy, declared Weeks of Mas-
sachusetts in opening the senate de-
bate, is no more repellant nor unde-
mocratic than governmental regula-
tion of wages, compulsory education
and compulsory insurance for em-
ployees. "The question we must now
consider is how we are going to give
the president what we have author-
ized him to employ-any army," said
Weeks.
"Are we going to do it in a man-
ner demonstrated over and over again
as ill-advised, ineffective, and dis-
astrous, or are we to turn our atten-
tion to the experience of other coun-
tries and take from the experiences
those lessons which will enable us to
steer clear of the follies of the past.
That is really the dividing line be-
tween efficiency and inefficiency.
Whenever we haje engaged in a great
war it has been necessary to resort
to draft in order to bring it to a suc-
cessful conclusion."
Bandages Made at Red Cross Meeting
Bandages and surgical dressing will
be made at the weekly meeting of the
Red Cross from 3 to 6 o'clock this aft-
ernoon at Barbour gymnasium. The
kits which the organization has been
making for the army and navy boys
have been completed. All women who
can spare a few minutes time are
urgently requested to come over and
roll a bandage.

Dean Effinger Gives French Lecture
For the benefit of those unfamiliar
with the French language, Dean John
R. Effinger will deliver the last of the
series of Cercle Francais lectures in
English, this afternoon at 5 o'clock, in
Tappan hall. His subject will be
Victorien Sardou's "Les Pattes de
Mouche," the French play to be pre-
sented next Thursday night In Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.

Chicago Alumni Send Petition to
Ask Compulsory Military Training

$1,000 PLEDGED AT
"TY" MASS MEETING,

"Establish a course in military
training, such course to be required
of all male students and to include
both study yand drill in military
tactics," read a petition received by
President Harry B. Hutchins from the
Michigan alumni association of Chi-
cago yesterday, signed by 238 mem-
bers.
"I will present the petition to the
board of regents for consideration,"

said the president late yesterday aft-
ernoon. "I have written a letter to
the Chicago alumni association telling
them of the action which has already
been taken by the Regents."
There is some doubt as to whether
the Regents will tape any action upon
the petition other than to acknowl-
edge it, because of the fact that the
present facilities will not take care of
those taking volunteer drill.

Dr.

Van Vlack, 'IOM, Outlines Needs
to Be Met at Arabian Med-
ical Missions

Y. W. C. A. MEMBERS SUBSCRIBE
$300 TO "W. E. B. CAMPAIGN"

Haig 's Army to
Start Offensive
To Resume Drive After Pause of
Seven Days; Bring Up New
Supplies
By Perry Arnold
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
New York, April 23.-General Haig's
war machine was slated up again to-
day for a resumption of a general Brit-
ish offensive after the pause of nearly
a week.
The British commander-in-chief is
now striking at the so-called Wotan
line of the German permanent de-
fenses by a powerful thrust at Douar.
Official statements from both London
and Berlin indicated resumption of a
tremendous drive i this direction.
For nearly sevenlays the British

MAiJE CASTLE IU.S.A
TAKES COMMAND.
OF COLLEGE DRIL
OFFICER DETAILED TO UNIVE
SITY BY WAR DEPARTMENT
IMPRESSED BY WORK
TELLS COLLEGE MEN
TO AWAIT CALL HEF
lianuial of Arms and Regular Di
Most Important Items, Says
Military Mentor
By J. L. Stadeker

I

N. C. Fetter Relates Importance
Remaining Two Days
to Project

of

HUNDRES RUSH TO GET
TRININGCAMPBLAKS
SUPPLY IS EXHAUSTED IN SHORT
TIME AND MANY AWAIT
NEW CONSIGNMENT
That Michigan will furnish her
quota of men for the training camp
at Fort Sheridan is shown by the fact
that more than 200 men asked for ap-
plication blanks at the bureau of mili-
tary information in Alumni Memorial
hall yesterday afternoon.
Owing to the fact that the bureau
was able to obtain only 48 blanks
many of the men were turned away.
Mr. Philip E. Bursley, who is in charge
of the bureau, expects to have more
of these application blanks within a
few days, but does not know definitely
when he can get them.
Another preliminary examination
will be held in the office of Dr. James
H. Breakey by special favor of Dr.
Breakey this afternoon from 4 to 5
o'clock. It will be necessary for the
applicant to pass this examination be-
fore proceeding further.
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS ARE
APPOINTED AS TEACHERS

Pi Delta Epsilon
To Hear Towers
Former Editor of The Daily to Address
All Students Interested
in Journalism

The following students have secured
positions as teachers in Michigan
schools through the committee on ap-
pointments: Mina A. Sievert, '17, will
enter the Latin and German depart-
ments at Ovid, and William S. Caswell,
grad., will teach history and English
at Royal Oak. Helen M. Richey, '17,
will go to Plainwell to enter the Eng-
lish and German departments, while
R. D. Fraser, '17, will take the super-
intendency of the Godfrey avenue
school in Grand Rapids.
Helen E. Bush, '17, will take a posi-
tion in the English and history de-
partments at Frankfort, and Nina V.
Salisbury, '17, is to enter the county
normal school at Ithaca. Helen G.
Davis, '17, and Gertrude A. Miller,
grad., are to teach English at Pains-
dale and Grand Haven.
DR. FIELD SPEAKS IN BEHALF
OF MEMORIAL FUND TO JUDSON
That a good character is worth more
than all the riches on earth was the
subject of a sermon delivered by Dr.
J. N. Field of Los Angeles, at the first
Baptist church, Sunday morning. ' Dr.
Field said that the best man was not
the one who had the greatest intellect
or the greatest business instinct, but
the one who had the best heart.
The speaker outlined the life of
Edward Judson, late Baptist mission-
ary of New York City, and asked for
contributions for the Judson memorial
fund. Dr. Field is touring the country
in the interests of this fund.

Walter K. Towers, '10-'12L, and at
present editor of the American Boy,
will be the first speaker in a series
of lectures to be held under the aus-
pices of Pi Delta Epsilon, upperclass
honorary journalistic fraternity. The
lecture, which will be held in room 202
West hall at 4 o'clock this afterioon,
will deal with some of the problems
peculiar to the field of his magazine,
and will be open to all interested in
journalism.
The fraternity will hold a banquet
in the evening at the Catalpa Inn, at
which Mr. Towers will be the guest
of honor.
Two or three speakers on journal-
ism subjects will be brought to Ann
Arbor before the end of the semester.
The society is planning a complete
course of monthly lectures for the
coming school year, in order to arouse
interest in journalism, with the ulti-
mate purpose of establishing a sep-
arate department of journalism at the
University.
PROF. FERGUSON OF
HARVARD LECTURES
Foremost Authority on Greek History
in America Speaks on Land
from Economic View
Prof. William Scott Ferguson of
Harvard university, who lectures at
4:15 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in
the Natural Science auditorium on the
subject, "Greece, Past and Present;
Economic Contrasts," is widely known
as an authority on Greek history. The
speaker was a student for several
years in Athens, Greece, and has writ-
ten a number of books with reference
to that country.
This lecture, which will also be il-
lustrated with lantern slides, is open
to the public, and it is expected that
a large number will avail themselves
of the opportunity to hear Professor
Ferguson.
Kansas Head Pleas to Save Students
Lawrence, Kan., April 23.-Answer-
ing the challenge that students of
American universities and colleges are
slackers, Chancellor Strong asserted
at convocation that the United States
should profit by England's experience
and not send her best and most scien-
tific men to the front, since this is a
War of science.
Chancellor Strong asserted that the
war should not affect the normal lif(
of our universities, as the burden o
remaking and restoring the natio
after the war will in a large measure
fall upon them.

With the words of Dr. F. W. Gun-
saulus' fiery address in their memory,
and the enthusiasm of Sunday even-
ing's mass meeting to set them an ex-
ample, the 250 workers in the "Y"
campaign who last night met for din-
ner in Lane hall, themselves pledged
$1,000 of the $7,000 to be raised.
Earnest directness marked the
speeches. Dr. Van Vlack, '10M, lately
returned from Busrah, Arabia, out-
lined the work done and the needs to
be met at the medical mission.
The hospital at Busrah was the only
one for hundreds of miles. He told of
the old Arab who had come to them
after riding on camel back for 25 days
over the desert sands. "And we are
only asking for the chance to stay,"
he concluded. "We want to see Busrah
purged of its filth and disease, and
once more the garden spot of the
world. The time is not far distant."
N. C. Fetter, "Y" secretary, and W.
T. Adams, '17, general chairman, in-
stilled further enthusiasm into the
audience by telling them of the part
they were to play in the two days that
remained of the campaign. A black-
board depicting a spider's web, sym-
bolical of the "W. E. B. campaign,"
was swung to face the audience, and
as the amounts pledged were record-
ed, the sphir spun. One thousand
dollars had been subscribed before the
"locomotive" souililed, and the teams
left the building for the evening's
work.
More than $300 was subscribed by
members of the Y. W. C. A. Ethel Vail,
'17, who delivered a plea to the as-
sembled women, is captain of the team
pledging the sum of $204. Lillian Car-
negie, '17, the other team captain, re-
ported $84. The rest was pledged by
women of the medical school.
'LEARN TO SAY NO! '
Chauncey M. Depew Celebrates 83rd
Birthday; Gives Health Recipe
New York, April 23.-"Learn to say
no." This isChauncey M. Depew's ad-
vice on how to live long. Depew cele-
brated his 83rd birthday today.
"I feel like 43," he said, "and I have
seen as many things happen in my
lifetime as my father, grandfather, and
great grandfather saw in their lives
toge1 her. It is great to have lived
like d.at."
Depew's recipe for long life is tc
know how to turn down the things
that hurt. This, he said, develops the
will power, and with will power any
man can hang on as long as he likes
by merely resolving that he will no
grow old.
e
f War Workers Requested to See Fette
a All men interested in Y. M. C. A
e war camp work are requested to se(
N. C. Fetter in Lane hall, Thursday.

forces have been concerting pressure
on the German front, but without giv-
ing concerted offensive action. Dur-
ing that time they have been bringing
up the tremendous munition supplies
necessary for another period of bang-
ing away at the Germans. This period
has apparently now arrived. United
Press front dispatches reported the
probable capture of Gavrette. The
city is only four miles distant from
the Wotan line.
AMERICANS ABROAD
FAVOR DRAFT PLAN
Join British in Hope That U. S. Will
Raise Men by Conscrip.
tion Policy
By Ed. L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, April 23.-Americans here
joined with the British in the hope that
the United States will raise its men
by conscription, not by voluntary
draft. A careful canva.s of scores
of prominent Americans here together
with the views expressed in the lobby
of the house of commons developed
this unity today.
Members of the house of commons
are enthusiastic over the idea that
America will send an expeditionary
force at as early a date as possible,
but almost without exception the mem-
bers privately expressed a strong
warning that America benefit by Eng-
land's experience and avoid stripping
the nation of trained men needed to
organize and drill the proposed big
army.
DEPICTS U. S. IN WAR
Lyman Bryson and Dr Scott Write on
Conflict In Inlander
That the military spirit which is
sweeping over the campus . zenced
campus activities is evidenced by the
fact that the April number of the In-
lander contains articles on some phase
of the war by two faculty men.
Mr. Lyman Bryson, instructor in the
o rhetoric department, has written an
s article entitled "Why I Believe in Uni-
e versal Military Training," an ex-
y pression of opinion. Mr. Jonathan F.
s Scott, instructor in the history de-
t partment, in "Why We Are at War,'
reviews the main events which forced
the United States to declare war on
x Germany.
. The number also contains several
e essays, a story, and poems. It will be
placed on sale Friday at noon.

Major Charles W. Castle's here.
The army officer detailed to the Uni-
versity to take charge of military
training arrived in Ann Arbor yester-
day at 1:16 o'clock from Detroit. The
major spent the afternoon holding an
informal conference with President
Harry B. Hutchins and in company
with Prof. Joseph Bursley of the en-
gineering college inspecting the Uni-
versity and Ferry field, which is to
be used for training purposes.
Major Castle stated last night that
nothing definite has been decided as
yet regarding the training and courses
to be given, because of the short time
that he has had to get things in shape
Training under general orders num-
ber 49 as issued by the war depart-
ment will be instituted, however, in-
volving three hours drill weekly for
underclassmen, including both dril
and theoretical instruction in the way
of lectures. Volunteers for the ad
vanced course which is given the las
two years of the student's course in
volves five hours drill weekly, an
pays the student $9 a month from the
government.
Ferry Field to Be Used
"Ferry field is plenty large enough
to be used for close order drill," the
major said. "Because of the shor
time that remains before the end o
the semester the reserve officers' corps
probably will not be instituted unti
next fall.
"Everything is uncertain at presen
because congress hasn't passed any
military service law," Major Castl
said. "Until such a law is passed
would advise college men to wait and
see what develops and prepare here a
much as you can.
Elementary Work Essential
"Those whom I saw marching an
drilling around the campus this aftei
noon impressed me favorably. The
seem to have a good start. What
wish to impress on the students is tha
it is this elementary work and th
manual of arms which are the funda
mentals of military science and mm
be learned before advanced progres
2an be made.
In regard to the officering of tt
campus regiments, Major Castle ex
pressed himself as being of the opin
ion that officers and non-commissione
officers will have to be selected fro:
among those students who have he
the most military training and hav
progressed the farthest. Here he la:
particular emphasis on the vacatio
battalion which drilled on Ferry fie
during the past vacation, saying th
these men should be able to help m
terially.
Major Castle is a graduate of We
Point of the class of 1894. He serve
in the Spanigh-American war
Porto Rico, Cuba, and the Philippine
being in service in the tropics f
seven years in all. He has also serve
on the Mexican border for three an
one-half years.

-

w f

01

A

HELP THE SPIDER SPIN

7EE

W e

E.

"

A
7e
Y

Woman's League Reports on FridE
Reports of committees and 'officE
of the Woman's league for the p,
year will be read before the anni
masa meeting of the league at
o'clock Friday afternoon, April 27,
Barbour gymnasium.
There will be dancing, and refre
ments will be served.

Y

See the Spider at Lane Hall and the Busy Bee

p

--

n-

...

I

Thursday
Evening
at
8:00

"Les

THE CERCLE FRANCAIS
PRESENTS
Pattes de MOuche"
SEATS ON, SALE AT WAHR'S

Caswell
Angell.
Hall.

Sarah

I

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