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April 21, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Y, AP

TH MCIGN ALYKA

''ovide 5,O'
ies with fie
Women Turn Over $15(
Belgian Relief
Fund

t the rate of three cents-for e
Ld meal, 5,000 Belgian babies b
n provided with one meal by
tributions of the women of
versity to the Belgian relief fi
dropping three cent contribut
) the boxes placed in the sorori
league houses for the purpos
eiving contributions, $150 has b
ned over to the fund up to c
it is expected that the $200 m
1 be reached when all the hot
e been heard from.
box will be placed in the gen
ary tomorrow. Three centsX
s one meal for one Belgian b2
EMBER of ORDNANCE
1PATMENT EXPECT
TAKE UP UNIVERSITY'S PA
IN WAR MUNITION PREP.
ARATION
)ming under direct orders from
department, a member of the
ice department in Washington
Dcted to arrive in Ann Arbor
answer to a request sent so
ago for advice in proceeding w
munitions work by the chemi
.neering faculty, a telegram 'v
ived yesterday saying that a m
been detailed to the University
igan.
st what the ordnance departm
al will do is not known. It
ved that he will remain here
days to consult with the facu
aking up war munitions prepa

al
0 to
each
have
the
the
'und
ions
ities
e of
een
date
ark
uses
eral
pro-
aby.
RT
the
or-
is
to-
me
ith
cal
was
ian
of
ent
is
a
lty
ra-
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*1
*
*
*
*
1

BIRDS MISRATING TO
ANN ARBOR FROM SOUTH

"Y" flakes Life Easier for

Lonely

Soldiers

at Border

[SPEEDS P INDUSTRIES

Alpha Nu Defeats
Adelphi in Debate

l

RAINY WEATHER FURNISH
ABUNDANT FOOD
SUPPLY

[ES

(This is the second of the series o
articles on birds and their study pre
pared by the secretary of the Ann Ar
bor Bird club.)
The warm rainy weather of the pas
several days seems particularly at
tractive to birds, probably because i
serves to wake up the hibernating in
sects and other minute aniams, thu
providing an abundant food supply.
Vast flocks of migrants are coming
in from the South every day and on
must be very active in the field from
now on if he expects to add all o
them to his list. The number of kinds
of birds that may be seen or heard
during a morning trip d'several hours
at this time of year varies from about
20 to 50. A beginner, of course, can
not be expected to record as many as
this, but he is adv.ised to learn to
recognize a few species and then add
several more on each subsequent ex-
cursion.
Birds may be identified not only by
their coloration, but also by their
form, size, songs, activities, and hab-
its. Certain species will be found only
in the meadows, others in the under-
brush, some only in or near the wa-
ter, and others only in trees.
Meadowlarks Abundat'
The meadowlarks are large con-
spicuous birds, that as the name im-
plies, are to be found in meadows.
They are abundant, for example, in
the fields east of the observatory. They
are about as large as a robin, but
more plump and wit a shorter tail.
The upper parts are streaked with
brown and the underparts are yel-
low with a large crescent-shaped black
band across the breast. The song is
clear and flute-like and the call notes
are rapid and sputtering.
Usually the meadowlark skulks
about in'the long grass or perches on
top of slight elevations of the ground,
on fence posts, or in the tree tops.
Their flight is peculiar and quite char-
acteristic, being in a straight line
usually 10 or 15 feet above the ground
and accomplished by rapid wing
beats. It is evident by the description
that the meadowlark can be dis-
tinguished from other birds by its
habitat, size, form, coloration, song,
call notes, and activities.
The nest is built on the ground in
the tall grass and is shaped like a
Dutch oven with a dome of grass over
it which effectually hides the eggs
from enemies. Practically every other
kind of bird can be distinguished in
the same way, and it is recommended
that these characteristics be kept in
mind during field trips.
Many Common Birds
Some of the common birds that
should be encountered on every trip
during this time of year are as fol-
ows: Bluebird, robin, chickade9,
white breasted nuthatch, myrtle war-
bler, cardinal, towhee, song sparrow,
bronzed grackle, meadowlark, red-
winged blackbird, cowbird, crow, blue
ay, phoebe, flicker yellow-bellied
ap-sucker, downy woodpecker, hairy
woodpecker, kingfisher, red-tailed or
ed-shouldered hawk, mourning dove,
obwhite, and killdeer.
The following birds have arrived in
nn Arbor on the average the fourthE
eek in April during the past 25-
ears: Green heron, least fly-catcher,t
altimore oriole, cliff swallow, yellowx
arbler, myrtle warbler, catbird, andr
lue-grey greatcatcher. ,

S
if
t
It
t-
,s
g9
e
s

"Talk about homesickness," said a
worker in the "Y" campaign, lately
returned from the border, "why, my
freshman year wasn't a circumstance
to it. Lthought I knew what nostalagia
meant of a dull Sunday night with
the church bells ringing kind of mel-

politan opera. There were books, pa-
pers, magazines, plenty of writing pa-
per, and stamps. They got our mail
and sorted it out for us, got men to
come and give us a talk now and then,
besides holding services and Bible
classes that made better men and
soldiers of us all. There was a mis-
sion cut out for the 'Y,' and they full-
filed it completely. After May 8, there
will be another one, and it's only fair
that we begin to meet it right now.
War might be what Sherman said it
was, but life in the training camps is
a whole lot worse. You have all the
work and none of the excitement that
helps to keep you going when in ac-

A "Y" TENT

1

ancholy and my room mate out of
town for the week-end, and me 'wal-
lowing' in an ocean of gloom. But as o sIhtGaln n h oet
of soldiering began to wear off, I be-;
gan to look back on those nights in
Ann Arbor asa kind of spree.
"Same thing, only worse, in Mexi- THE LETTER HOME
co. Nothing but work, getting things
in order. Baggage arrived in a tion. Yes indeed, I am heart and soul
tangled mass. Inefficient officers, poor in favor of the plan of the Y. M. C. A.
food, and that unholy climate sure and you can look for me to do all I
made me long for home and mother. Ican to further it."
"If it hadn't been for the 'Y' and The reporter for The Daily closed
their pustting up a tent where a fel- his note book.
low could go to ease up, meeting some "Have you used my name, young
decent fellows, or snatching a quiet fellow?" asked the owner of the
moment for a letter home, I don't hairy paw that closed about our
know what I'd have done. That's why throat. "I'm naturally modest and-"
I'm going in for this campaign strong.i We squirmed from his grasp and
They had a grafonola that I wouldn't the big .front door of Lane hall swung
have traded for a box at the Metro- behind us. No names have been used.

WINTER WHEAT (OC REORPORT
UNFAVORABLE; RAIN
NEEDED
That the country's p sing from
peace to war is being accomplished
with a minimum of unsettlement was
the statement of Bradstreet's report
of April 7. While it is too early to
accurately guage the full effects upon
business now, marked activity pre-
vails in trade circles.
Speeding up injunctions have been
laid upon many lines of industry
throughout the country. Shipbuilding
activity in unprecedented, aeroplane
plants are working day and night on
government orders, lumber is active,
though the industry is deterred from
shipping by lack of cars, dye factories
are pushed to meet demands, some
munition plants that had , slowed
down have again become animated,
and automobile plants are rushed to
capacity.
Crop news respecting winter wheat
is unfavorable, but spring sowings of
wheat and other foodstuffs will be on
an enormous scale. Winter wheat
estimates range from 482,000,000 to
525,000,000 bushels, against an actual
crop last year of 482,000,000. Large
corn and oat areas are indicated, but
rain is needed if these are to prosper.
The east and southeast has had all
the rain needed and good planting and
growing weather is now desired.
Wheat, including flour, exports
from North America for the week end-
ing April 5, aggregate 2,329,589 bush-
els against 8,402,205 bushels of the
corresponding week last year.

Freshmen of Both Societies Argue on
Compulsory Military
Training
Debating affirmative of the question
of compulsory military training, the
freshman debating team of Alpha Nu
Debating society last night unanimous-
ly defeated the Adelphi freshman
team. This is the third debate held
since Delta Sigma Rho, the honorary
debating society, offered a silver
trophy for the annual competition of
the freshman teams of the literary col-
lege. This is the first time that Alpha
Nu has won the cup, Adelphi having
won it the two previous years.
The members of the winning team
were: W. O. Lampe, Detroit; I. B.
Selby, Spokane, Wash., and E. F.
Boxell, Marion, Ind. The Adelphi
men were: A. J. Himmelhoch, Detroit;
L. H. Seltzer, Detroit, and A. E. Saw-
yer, St. Matthews, Ky.
TO HOLD TUBERCULOSIS
CLINICS IN CITY Y. M. C. A.
For the purpose of determining the
improvement in the condition of tuber-
cular persons examined last year, and
diagnosing new cases, the Collegiate
Alumnae and the hospital circle of
King's' Daughters will conduct infant
welfare and tuberculosis clinics at the
city Y. -M. C. A. for one week begin-
ning April 23, from 10 until 4 o'clock
daily. The visiting nurse will hold
clinics during this time in the prin-
cipal towns of tihe country but has
reserved Saturday, April 28, for Ann
Arbor.
CRAFTSMEN TO DISCUSS PLANS
FOR ANNUAL BANQUET TONIGHT
Plans for the annual banquet to be
given- April 28 will be discussed at
the regular'meeting of the Craftsmen
club to be held at 7:30 o'clock tonight
at the Masonic temple.
Grand Master John H. Hawks and
Past Grand Master George L. Lusk
both of Lansing will be present to in-
stall the new officers of the club. The
report of the play which was given
in Detroit just before vacation started
will be given.

k

INTELLIGENCE BUREAU
NEEDS MORE STUDENTS

1
i

WORIK BEING CARRIED ON IN
MORE THAN EIGHTY
COLLEGES

* * * * * *

* *

T THE THEATERS

TODAY

Vhitney-"Peg 0' My Heart."
iajestic-Jules Verne's "Twen.
ty Thousand Leagues Under
the Sea."

i

reade-Alice Joyce and Harry
Morey in "The Courage of Sil-
ence." Mrs. Vernon Castle in
"Patria."

More men and women are needed by
the intercollegiate intelligence bureau
to file the index cards which have been
returned to the Union. Blanks are ar-
riving at the rate of more than 100
a day and 5,000 have been returned in
all. The plan of handling the cards
calls for the women to work during
the afternoons and the men at night.
All students who have not filled out
the blanks and sent them into the
Union are expected to do so at once.
The work is being carried on in more
than 80 colleges and universities and
the signing of the blanks in no way
places individuals under any obliga-
tions.
The executive committee of the bur-
eau met yesterday afternoon in the of-
fice of Dean Henry M. Bates, adjutant
general of the local branch. The in-
ternal organization of the bureau will
be continued and when all the reports
are compiled, they will be sent into
the national headquarters which have
been moved from Philadelphia to
Washington.

DIRECT TAXP MIMORIAL
SIG NED BY. ECONOMISTS
HIGH RATE OF TAXATION ON IN-
COMES AND LUXURIES
PREPARED
Members of the economics faculty
of the University has signed the me-
morial which is to be sent to con-
gress, advocating that the expenses of
the war be paid as far as is possible
by means of direct taxation, instead
of by loans.
This memorial was originally drawn
up at the University of Minnesota and
is being circulated among all college
and university instructors in political
science and economics in the United
States. Specific suggestions have been
made as to the best' method of
raising the money by taxation. Among
the proposals are a higher rate of
taxation on incomes, the reduction of
the exemption provision, the making
of the income tax more highly pro-
gressive, and taxes on the consump-
tion of luxuries.
ALUMNI SECRETARIES PRAISE
UNION OPERA PRODUCTION

Women to Replace Men on Newspaper
Bloomington, Ind., April 20.-Young1
women of the Journalism department
will be given an opportunity to become
members of _the regular staff of the
Richmond Palladium this year in or-
der that the men will not be kept from
military service.
New Married Students' Club Formed
Bloomington, Ind., April 20.-Mar-
ried Students' club is the name of a
new organization at Indian State uni-
versity. Undergraduates who are mar-
ried are admitted to its meetings.

1857 Dry Goods, Furniture and Women's Fashions 1917 ID
n

4

rpheum - Frank Keenan in
"The Crab." Triangle com-
edy, "The Road Agent."

Lu

-Clara Kimball Young in

I

"The Savage." "Luke's
tered .Sleep."
* * * * * * * * * * *
AT THE WHITNEY

Shat-

Peg 0' My Heart," the whimsical
na of English and Irish life will
hown at the Whitney theater to-
it. Laurette Taylor, the wife of
:artley Manners, the author of the
was its original star. In both
country and England the play has
yed a continuous success for the
two years.
ie story has to do with an Irish
an who with her dog, Michael,
s to live with some English rela-
. She stirs up their placid life
her disregard of the conventions
rved there. In much the same
ast is her dog Michael to the pet
r relatives' household, a pampered
e spaniel.
this engagement the part of Peg
ayed by Marion Dentler.

1:
j
r
b
A
y
B
b.

I

I-

UNIVERSITY BULLETIN TO
ENCOURAGE LANGUAGE STUDY)

Forestry Notes

AT THE MAJESTIC

ne of the most terrifying experi-
es which is described by Alan
ubar occurred when he was play-
the part of Captain Nemo in the
natization of Jules Verne's "Twen-
Phousand Leagues Under the Sea"
suddenly came face to face with
rge man-eating shark. When he
ged at him; Mr. Holubar struck
aim with his gun, expecting a life
death battle, but the fish turned
and glided off.
wenty Thousand Leagues Under'
Sea" will be shown at the Majestic
y for the last time.

L

t
f

Prof. Leigh J. Young of the forestry
department is conducting a party of
senior and graduate students in for-
estry on a two weeks trip through the
Appalachian region ofNorth Carolina,
to visit the areas under forest manage-
ment. The party will visit the Biltmore
tract which was placed under forest
'conditions about 15 years ago by the
Biltmore Forestry school,aand will
study the silviculture of this and other
forest lands of the South. On the re-
turn trip various wood using indus-
tries will be studied.

1
t
9
2
i,
a
c
tE

Owing to the rapidly changing pol-
itical conditions, and the consequent
new importance of the study of for-
eign language as a diplomatic medium,
the University is issuing bulletins of
the modern foreign language depart-
ments to appear' probably within the
next week. The bulletins will em-
phasize the importance of the modern
language and encourages the study of
them. At the present time there are
9 courses in Spanish, 10 in French, and
20 in German, besides several in Ital-
ian and Russian.
A special bulletin is also being pre-
pared to explain the short course in'
automobile engineering to be given
during the coming summer. This
course will be in charge of Prof. Wal-
ter T. Fishleigh and Mr. Walter E. Lay.

Prof. W. R. Humphreys of the Eng-
lish department will lead a series of
meetings beginning tomorrow evening
for the Plymouth Round Table, stu-
dent organization of the Congrega-
tional church. Professor Humphreys
has chosen to discuss the four gospels
in thesetmeetings, one Sunday being
devoted to each.
Although planned primarily for stu-
duents, the Sunday night discussions
are open to all interested. The meet-
ings begin at 6:30 o'clock and close
promptly at 7:30 o'clock.

Secretaries of six Michigan alumni
associations, representing the cities
in which "Fools' Paradise" played dur-
ing the spring tour, have written
Homer Heath, '07, general secretary of
the Union, praising the play and ask-
ing to be retained on future trips.
Three days after the Saginaw per-
formange was given the academy of
music of that city, the scene of the
production, was destroyed by fire.
"The result of "Fools' Paradise" being
shown here will enable the local asso-
ciation to arouse more Michigan inter-
est," wrote the Saginaw secretary.
TO DISCUSS FOUR GOSPELS
AT PLYMOUTH ROUND TABLE

L=j
H
n

[U

L_----.-
'--I ~ ~ _______--_
- .,
- /-
---
- .~---
---
NEW FRONT LACE MODELS IN WARNER
AND REDFERN CORSETS
Introducing a sufficient variety of styles to enable any
woman with a front-lace preference to be correctly fitted in
either of these two popular makes.
AT $1.50-(Warner) A lightly boned batiste with low
bust and free hips, for the average figure.
AT $2.00-(Warner) An embroidery trimmed coutil
corset for average figure.
AT $2.50-(Warner) A rather heavily boned coutil cor-
set for the full figured woman.
AT $3.50-(Redfern) An excellent light weight batiste
corset for the average figure. Boned with "Reflex"
boning.
AT $4.00 (Warner) An exceptionally fine value in pink
broche for the average figure.
AT $5.00-(Redfern) A full figured corset of white cou-
til with medium high bust and long skirt.
Also one of pink brocade especially adapted for the
average figure.
(Corset Shop-Second Floor)
TWO IMPORTANT SALES!
$25.00 Coats, New Stuniiping Styles, at $18.75
$:5.00 to $30.00 Suits, bout Fifty, at $19.75
Both groups just unboxed. Presenting all the leading
fabrics and colors of the season, splendidly tailored in a
variety of original and charming designs. Today only!
(Fashion Salons-Second Floor)'

D
0u

I'

I

CABOT SAYS AERIAL EXPERTS
ARE FEW IN UNITED STATES

N. 'L. Cary, '15, was in Ann Arbor
recently on his way back to the Wash-
ington-Oregon forestry district where
he has been appointed forest assistant.

{

.Cambridge, Mass., April 20.-There
are few capable aviators in the Unit-
ed States army and navy, in the opin-
ion of Godfrey Lowell Cabot, as ex-
pressed in the Harvard Crimson.
Mr. Cabot, a graduate of Harvard,
is organizing an aviation reserve
squad for the United States aerial
corps. "There are only 70 army and
30 navy men who are competent fliers,"
said Mr. Cabot. "By competent I mean
men who could successfully do long-
distance scouting and courier work."

I
rTv-rl

r^s

I

I

a good Eastman Kodak, 10c

-Fresh Eastman Films
evening to 9. Lyndon's
719 N. University Ave.
drop films through tube
-Adv.

-open
Kodak
After
at the
Sat

!

C. G. Hammer, '14, stopped yester-
day on his way to the Indian forest
reserve in northern Wisconsin, where
he has been appointed assistant in for-

'

Expects to Teach Aerial Students
New Haven, Conn., April 20.-Yale's
aerial observation unit is to receive
instruction by two experts who have
made a specialty of kite balloon flying.
Class room as well as practical work
will be given the students enrolled in
order that they may learn the theory
as well as the application of the prin-
ciples involved.

I

u
n

I

1(

e

est

3r

i.

I

I

fine Watch Repairing, J. L.
an, Jeweler, 113 Main St.-Adv.
Tues. e.o.d.

Charles M. Sporley, '17, who is tak-
ing special work in timber preserva-
tives, spent part of his vacation at the
government forest products laboratory
at Madison, Wis.

I

Botonical Gardens Receive 100 Plants
The' University botanical gardens
have received a shipment of 100 plants,
many of which come from the ex-
treme northern parts of China and Si-
beria, from the department of agri-

.'- _ --
Attend Fort Snelling Summer Camp
Minneapolis, Minn., April 20.-Stu-
dents of the University of Minnesota
are organizing a unit of men to at-
tend the summer training camp at
Fort Snelling.

ll7~

L

ii

1{

culture at Washington.

~I EZZ~Z ~ E~XZ~J ~

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