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April 21, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-21

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THE WEATHER
R11N A1) COLDER
TODAY

,trl i!jttn

IZII1I

UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 139. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN

800 MEN IN FIRST
ENGINEERIING DRILL

FRENCH OFFENSIVE AND BRITISH
PUSH CONTINUE STEADY ADVANCE

By Perry Arnold
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
New York, April 20.-The fifth day

Major C. E. Wilson PIeased at Appear- I of the French offensive and the 44th

ance of Regiment Yes-
terday

ALL STUDENTS TO BE ABLE
TO TAKE PART IN COM'PANY
Platoon Under Prof. C. T. Johnston
Makes Maps of County
Around City
Nearly 800 men appeared for the
first drill of the Engineering college
held yesterday afternoon from the
hours of 4 to 5 o'clock. The men were
started off at squad drill under the
direction of experienced men, many of
the squad leaders being taken from
the engineering students enrolled in
the vacation battalion.
Major C. E. Wilson was much
pleased at the first appearance of the
regiment. He expects to keep the men
at squad drill for the next two weeks
until. they are all familiar with the
more elemental formations.
The freshman class was 'the only
one of all the classes in the college
not coming out for drill. The reason
for their being absent was the fact
that they had not received official noti-
fication of the drill.
All students will have an opportun-
ity to take part in regular drill as
soon as the organization of class com-
panies is completed. Competent drill
masters will be furnished for each of
the new companies.
A platoon under the direction of
Prof. C. T. Johnston of the geodesy
and surveying department spent the
afternoon in making maps of the coun-
try surrounding Ann Arbor. This is
a regular part of the course In ele-
ments of military engineering.
The vacation battalion, much re-
duced in numbers, also spent an hour
in drilling upon Ferry field. The only
company remaining in the battalion is
Company E. The men in charge an-
nounce that new recruits may come
into the company by applying to Prof.
J. A. Bursley of the Engineering col-
lege.
Prof. John Dewey
to Lecture Today
Columbia University Man Talks on
"Education for De-
mocracy"
Prof. John Dewey of Columbia uni-
versity, who speaks on the subject,
"Education for Democracy" at 8
o'clock tonight in the auditorium
of the Natural Science building, will
be remembered by some as being the
youngest man ever appointed to Mich-
igan's faculty, when at the age of 25
he came to Apn Arbor as an instructor
in the department of education.
Concerning the speaker, the Inde-
pendent says, "If some historian
should construct an intellectual
weather map of the United States he
would find the little arrows success-
ively pointing in toward Ann Arbor,
Chicago, and New York, indicating
that at these points there was a ris-
ing current of thought. And if he went
so far as to investigate the cause of
these local upheavals of the academic
atmosphere he would discover that
John Dewey had moved from one place
to the other."
To Better Coast Artillery Corps Soon
Ithaca, N. Y., April 20.--Our coast
artillery corps will soon be the most
powerful and efficient in the world, ac-
cording to a statement of Captain G.
R. Harrison, U. S. A., in a lecture here
a few days ago. The corps is shortly
to be increased from 715 officers and
19,019 men to 1,200 officers and 30,-
039 men.

day of the British push found both
allied armies still advancing today.
Official statement showed General
Haig driving his steel wall closer to
the Cambrai-St. Quentin line of com-
munications, and thrusting more di-
rectly on the front of Cambrai, while
General Neville struck trip-hammer
blows at a crumbling German defense
on the Soissons-Rheims line.
In. five days the French have con-

quered almost as much land from Ger-
man forces as the British have taken
in their long offensive, not counting
the territory surrendered to the Brit-
ish in the Hindenburg plan of strategic
retreat. French official statements
also indicate greater captures of men
and material than that taken by Haig's
forces.
Britain's two armies in Messo-
potamia and Palestine are now vigor-
ously on the offensive again. General
Murray today reported progress to-
ward the Holy City of Jerusalem, and
General Maude detailed the route of
the 18th Turkish army corps.

CAMPAIGN WORKERS TO
GET FINALINSTRUCTIONS
PARTICIPANTS IN "Y" COLLEC-
TION TO DINE AT LANE
HALL TONIGHT

With all in readiness for the open- I soldiers is very low and the optimistic

BELIEVES GERMANY
BROKE INTERNALLY
Chicagoan, Returning from Europe,
Says People Expect End of
War in Four Months
New York, April 20.-Germany is
broken internally. The morale of her

TELLS PERSONL LIVES
OF MANY GRET POETS

BAKER PRESENTS 138
CADETS WITH DIPLOMASi
SECRETARY OF WAR URGES NEW
OFFICERS TO DO THEIR
BEST

CENTURY HEAD SAYS BOOKS
1850 BETTER THAN PRES-
ENT ONES

OF

Personal glimpses into the life of West Point, April 20.-Urging themI

great authors and the many incidentsf
which turn the path of a publisher1
from the common grind of every day
events were told by W. W. Ellsworth1
in his lecture on "Forty Years as a
Publisher," delivered before classes in
journalism yesterday afternoon.
Mr. Ellsworth for many years served1
as president of the Century Publish-+
ing company and this connection1
brought him into close contact with
the master minds of fiction. He de-
scribed how Robert Louis Stevenson1
came into the Century offices, fresh<
from an emmigrant ship, but was
turned away with his precious manu-
scripts.
An interesting incident in the life
of Jack London was brought forth7
when Mr. Ellsworth related the con-
tents of a letter which he receivedI
from London a few years before his+
death. The letter stated that London
had on hand material for 100 novels
and 500 short stories.
Among the names of authors de-
scribed by Mr. Ellsworth were Kip-
ling, Harris, Cable, Twain, Davis, Al-'
cott, and many others, all of whom het
had intimate acquaintance with.
Mr. Ellsworth told of the best sel-
ler- and remarked that the books pro-
duced in the years from 1850 to 1860{
formed a collection of peculiar stars
in the field of fiction. He remarked
that these books were far above the
average effort of the present age.
MILITARY TRAINING
CLASS FILLED UP
No More Enrollments in Military En-
gineering Will Be
Accepted
Classes in military engineering in;
the Engineering college are now
closed and no more enrollments will
be accepted. The committee on mili-:
tary affairs took- the action at its meet-
ing yesterday afternoon. The class
rolls will be checked immediately and
he number taking the course an-1
nounced next week.I
Enrollment cards will be handed out
to each man at the drill period nextE
Tuesday. These cards are to be filled'
out and harded in to the company of-
ficer in order that proper credit can1
be given for the work.]

to do their best in the world war which
the United States has entered, Secre-
tary of War Baker presented 139 West
Point graduates their diplomas today,
and added them to the roster of offi-
cers of the United States army.
Indirect reference to the conscrip-
tion issue which now faces the gov-
ernment brought cheers of approval
from the crowd which packed the
academy gymnasium. While the cere-
monies were in progress two aero-
planes from the government station
at Mineola alighted on the grass plain
outside. They had been driven here
by Captain J. W. Butts and Lieutenant
H. S. Marin in 32 minutes.
Secretary Baker emphasized the
need for universal military training,
and was cheered by the cadets whose
graduation was advanced 60 days be-
cause of the war. With Major-General
Hugh L. Scott, chief of staff, and Mrs.
Baker, the secretary reviewed the
West Point battalion after the cere-
mony.
The officers left at once on a special
train for New York on a month's leave
of absence before reporting to the com-
mand to which they have been or-
dered. Cadet Harris Jones of Clay-
ville, New York, was the honor man
of the class, while John P. Nygaard
of Wisconsin was the last man on the
role, "the goat" in West Point par-,
lance.
PHYSICALLY UNFIT
MEN TO BE NEEDED
Can Serve Country in Munition Plants,
on Farms, and in Red Cross
Service
"Men who are physically unfit for
service in the military forces of the
United States need not despair of be-
ing able to serve the country," said
Mr. Philip E. Bursley of the bureau of
military information, in an interview
yesterday afternoon.
"They will be needed in the muni-
tion factories, on the farms, and in
the Red Cross service," continued Mr.
Bursley. "A large number of men
will be needed to carry on this work
and there is no reason why the men
who fail to pass the physical examina-
tions for military service should not
help out in this way."

ing of the campaign soon to be started
by the "Y," final instructions will ber
issued to the workers at a dinner tot
be held in Lane Hall tonight. Mem-
bers of the faculty, fraternity repre-
sentatives, members of the board of
trustees, the general campaign com-
mittee, and the captains of the vari-
ous teams, will be present.
C. H. Johnson of Jackson, who hasa
spent many months with the troops
on the Mexican border, will deliver a
short talk on the work of the "Y" in
camp and field, while N. C. Fetter, gen-
eral secretary of the local branch, as-
sisted by W. T. Adams, '17, general
chairman, will outline the plans for
the campaign.
At the mass meeting to be held in
Hill auditorium at 7:30 o'clock tomor-
row night, Dr. Gunasulus, president ofl
the Armour Institute of Technology,
of Chicago, will address the audience.
An effort is being made to have Dr.
Van Vack present at the time to de-
scribe his experiences at Busrah. He
will deliver several addresses to the
students during the course of the cam-
paign.
To indicate the progress of the sub-
scription toward the $7,000 goal set,
there will appear two signs, one at the
"Y" and the other in the window of
the Busy Bee, showing a spider spin-
ning a web.
W. T. Adams, '17, will act as gen-
eral chairman, while 0. C. Heywood,
'17, heads the committee on the work
of the teams; H. R. Louis, '19, pub-
licity; H. L. Haag, '17, meetings; M.
B. Doty, '1SE, fraternity work, and
J. E. Robinson, '19, will have charge
of the mass meeting to be held tomor-
row evening.3
RUSSIAN-GERMAN
TRUCE REPORTED
Dispatch Comes from Spanish Diplo-
matic Channels; Not Taken ;
Seriously
Buenos Aires, April 20.-The cypher
"message received by the Spanish lega-
tion at Rio de Janeiro declared Rus-
sia and Germany signed an armistice,
according to a dispatch from the
Brazilian capital this afternoon.
The round-about rumor of an arm-
istice between Russia and Germany by
way of Spanish diplomatic channels in
South America was not taken very
seriously. It was suggested that it
might have originated among certain
strong German influences in Rio de
Janeiro, known to be in close touch
with the pro-German party in Spain.
Not Officially Confirmed
Washington, April 20.-State depart-
ment officials this afternoon said they
had no confirmation or even sugges-
tion that Russia and Germany had
signed an armistice. It was suggested
that report of such an agreement
might be German propaganda trans-
mitted out of Germany by wireless by)
the way of Spain.

views of her militaristic newspapers
no longer are influencing the minds of
the people, was the statement made
today by Alfred Stedman of Chicago
on his arrival at an American port to-
day from southern Europe.
He also said people in Germany and
southern Switzerland expect the end
of the war within four months.
Holland Able to
Diouble army Size
Could Increase Army to 720,000 Says
Kansas Professor in Lecture
Yesterday
"If Holland enters the war she will
be able to increase her present stand-
ing army of 372,000 men to 720,000,
and she would not hesitate to flood the
country, if necessary," said Prof. Peter
A. F. Appelboom of the University of
Kansas in his lecture on "Holland and
Its People," yesterday afternoon in
Alumni Memorial hall.
Professor Appelboom in describing
the country of his birth, stated that
although Holland is considered lack-
ing in natural beauty, it has never-
theless been the subject and inspira-
tion of some of the world's greatest
artists. "Simplicity," he said, "is the
keynote of Dutch life and freedom of
religion its corner stone."
Speaking on the war situation, he
said, "Holland's attitude toward the
war and its participants is one of pity.
She is caring for thousands of Belgian
and German children. The question
of national defense has been of great
importance to Holland since the war."
Professor Appelboom came to Michi-
gian for the purpose of aiding the
Dutch people= of the state in their ef-
forts to raise money for the endow-
ment of a chair in Dutch literature
in the University. He stated'that the
University of London is installing a
chair in Dutch language and literature
and that several other universities and
colleges are doing likewise.
ASK FOR AVAILABLE
WORKERS ON FARMS

WANTS RIIGO
USINES BSI
COFFIN URGES DEFINITE POLICY.
INSTEAD OF EMOTIONAL
PIlESSURE
THINKS INDUSTRIES
MUST BE KEPT GOING
Believes Commercial Relations Will
Be Enhanced Instead of
Hindered
Washington, April 20.-A United
States army raised on a common
sense business basis rather than
through emotional pressurewastad-
vocated today through the govern-
ment's new committee on public in-
formation by Howard Coffin, chairman
of the committee on industrial pre-
paredness of the naval consulting
board.
The American people, he said, have
a reputation for horse sense and busi-
ness ability. "Is it not better that we
live up to this reputation in raising an
army upon some basis where it will
not b@ necessary to shock the country
into a semi-hysterical state to bring
out enlistments in large numbers?"
Coffin said.
Need Definite Policy
"The job which we are tackling is
a big one, but there is nothing mys-
terious about it. It needs a definite
policy, business organization, and hard
work. We must get away from the
idea that things have been changed in
this country over night because of a
declaration of war. Our business re-
l tions with all foreign countries have
been enhanced rather than hindered.
"Because there may be a food short-
age in prospect it should not be neces-
sary that our people should stop buy-
ing shoes. We must raise greater
crops to offset the food shortage, but
we must remember also that we must
raise taxes. Our surest methods of
meeting taxes and absorbing bond is-
sues lies in keeping business going at
full speed."
NAVY OFFICER HERE
To Examine Senior Medics Who Wish
to Enlist in Medical Corps
Dr. Edgar Thompson of Washington,
D. C., examining officer for the navy,
is in the city giving physical examina-
tions to all those senior medics who
wish to enlist in the medical corps of
the navy.
An average of 85 per cent during the
four years of their scholastic work is
required before they will be admitted
into the medical corps.
200 SUFFRAGISTS PLEA FOR.
PASSAGE OF VOTE MEASURE
Washington, April 2. -Faced by 200
resolute suffragists, flanked by the
flags of 22 nations which have recog-
nized their cause, members of the pen-
ate suffrage committee today heard a
virile plea for suffrage as a war time
measure.
Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin
led the assault upon the senatorial
citadel seconded by Mrs. Carey Chap-
man Catt, president of the National
American Women's Suffrage associa-
tion. Immediate passage of the An-
thony amendment to the constitution
that the nation may not at this time

be crippled by political discrimination
against women was urged.
L. ". Dan, '17, Marries Ruth Dow '17
Leland I. Doan, ex-'17, married Ruth*
Dow, ex-'17, at the home of her par-
ents in Midland, April 7, and after May
10 will be at home at 519 Monterey
street, Detroit. Doan was a member
of the Sigma Chi fraternity, and Miss
Dow was a member of the Alpha Phi
sorority.

First Inquiries for Information
ered by Bureau Received
Yesterday

Gath-

The first inquiries for information
gathered by the intelligence bureau
were received yesterday from the state
intelligence division asking the num-
ber of students, faculty, and alumni
available for farm work this summer
in the greater crops campaign now be-
ing carried on in Michigan.
All recipients who have not an-
swered their blanks are asked to do
so at 'once that the information may
be entirely complete.
Former Gargoyle Editor to Marry
The engagement of W. A. P. John,
'16, managing editor of the 1915-16
Gargoyle, to Miss Hildegrade Hager-
man has recently been announced. The
marriage is set for June 26 at the
home of the bride in Ludington.

- a

Y. M. C. A.
.
W. E. B.

SUNDAY, 7:30 P. M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

7:30 P. M., SUNDAY

H EN EACH ANDALL BEGIN
TO HELP THE SPIDER SPIN

Y. W. C.A.
A
W. E. B.

SPEAKER: DR. F. W. GUNSAULUS

SPECIAL MUSIC

_

L_________________________________

--

Foreover twenty-five years Profes-
sor Dewey' has been a commanding
figure in American philosophical and
educational fields. First at Michigan,
then at Chicago, and now at Columbia
he has always had f marked influence
not only upon the intsitution with
which he was connected but upon the
educational ideals of the country as a
whole.

I

Professor John Dewey
Oem cracy anCEdULC
TONIGH1T AT 8:00 AUDITORIUM SCIENCE BUILDING

1 7,
ilo~n

IU

Even to those who do not know
Professor Dewey the fact that he is
lecturing under the auspices of the
Michigan Forum is a guarantee that
what he will say tonight will not con-
sist of oonventional platitudes about
the importance of education but will
be a vital message on the function of
education in Democracy.

I

25c

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